Oaxaca: violence due to awarding of reparations to victims of 2006

A few days before the commemoration of the 25 November 2006 repression, Isaac Torres Carmona, president of the Mexican League for the Defense of Human Rights in Oaxaca (Limeddh), reported that the government of Gabino Cué had committed itself to make available some 11 million pesos to compensate the 64 “survivors and former political prisoners” due to the “moral damage” suffered during the socio-politial conflict of 2006-7.  Torres Carmona noted that on Monday 14 November was awarded “symbolic compensation” (170,000 pesos per affected person) to 44 of the 64 victims who accepted the deal, a fruit of the demand for reparation made through civil methods.

Subsequently, Porfirio Domínguez, director of the Committee of Relatives, Disappeared, Murdered, and Political Prisoners in Oaxaca (Cofadappo), denounced that the present government is attempting to divide the victims of 2006, stressing that “there are more than 400 affected, not only those 50 who have been receiving their money so as not to continue demanding justice, all of this to weaken the movement.”

In response, Limeddh clarified in a communique that “we categorically reject that this has to do with a distribution of resources on the part of the state government to divide the victims, as has been theorized publicly by some dissident voices that seek only to confuse public opinion and contribute to a bad political state, with uncertain ends sought.”  It claims that the act “constitutes a victory in the struggle for the observation of human rights.”  It acknowledged nonetheless that “the question of justice continues to be a task to be fulfilled by the present government,” given that during the magisterial and popular conflicts were committed 26 murders, in addition to 500 arrests and around 380 cases of torture.

Porfirio Domínguez and Isaac Torres engaged with each other on 23 November.  The followers of both accused each other of seeking only economic benefit, not justice for the affected.  In this confrontation many of the expressions were threats.

In a subsequent communiqué, the Citizens’ Space for Truth and Justice in Oaxaca denounced that “These lamentable acts have come about starting from a discretional management of information and a lack of transparency int he process of creating a means that would supposedly attend to the demands of justice of the victims of human-rights violations in 2006.  The aforementioned has brought about a series of rumors, disqualifications, and divisions which far from repairing damages contribute to a new re-victimization.”  The Space advocates a legal and transparent process, as well as the creation of measures for transitional justice, including a Commission for Truth, that “would help to supercede the authoritarian past and the climate of social polarization now lived in the state.”

For more information (in Spanish):

Denuncia Cofadappo que gobierno intenta dividir a víctimas(Noticiasnet.mx, 16 November 2011)

Destina Oaxaca 11 mdp para indemnizar a 64 víctimas del conflicto de 2006 (Proceso, 18 November 2011)

Comunicado completo de la Limeddh-Oaxaca (18 November 2011)

ONG de Oaxaca rompe con la Limeddh por indemnizaciones (La Jornada, 24 November 2011)

PRONUNCIAMIENTO DEL “ESPACIO CIUDADANO POR VERDAD Y JUSTICIA” SOBRE EL CASO DE LA REPARACIÓN DEL DAÑO PATRIMONIAL A VÍCTIMAS DEL 2006. (Pronunciamiento del Espacio Ciudadano, 24 November 2011)

For more information from SIPAZ (in English):

Oaxaca: Creation of the Citizens’ Space for Justice and Truth (22 September 2011)

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