Oaxaca: Beginning of consultation regarding wind-energy park in Juchitán

November 12, 2014

Consulta en Juchitán (@Gobierno del estado de Oaxaca)

Consultation in Juchitán (@state-government of Oaxaca Oaxaca)

On 3 November, a consultative process was launched in Juchitán de Zaragoza in comformity with the stipulations of Convention 169 of the International Labor Organization (ILO).  This process will involve five phases to allow for the population to accept or reject a proposed project for 132 wind-energy plants that would be installed on a territory of 5,332 hectares in their jurisdiction.  This project would be owned by the Wind-Energy Firm of the South (formerly Mareña Renovables).  This is the same project that was rejected by the Ikojts people in San Dionisio del Mar and the Binnizá from Álvaro Obregón, near Juchitán.

For the present, the form of the consultative process is being defined.  The question has unleashed a number of reactions regarding the validity of said mechanism between those who believe it be a genuine and historical process, being the first consultation that is carried out, while others feel it is mere pretense.

For more information (in Spanish):

Se inicia en Juchitán consulta pública sobre parque eólico (La Jornada, 4 de noviembre de 2014)

Inicia en Juchitán proceso de consulta previa sobre proyecto eólico (Radio Formula, 3 de noviembre de 2014)

Modifican procedimiento del Protocolo de consulta eólica (Romonoticias, 4 de noviembre de 2014)

Protocolo para la Consulta en Juchitán

El parque eólico juchiteco: participación y preguntas(Quadratin Oaxaca, 30 de octubre de 2014)

Bodas de plata del Convenio 169 de la OIT: lo bueno, lo malo y lo feo (El periódico, 26 de octubre de 2014)

La consulta previa y los malabares del gobierno (Animal Político, 16 de octubre de 2014)


Chiapas/International: Spanish journalists leave the country amidst threats of extortion and disappearance

November 12, 2014

Melchor Miralles (@Wikipedia)

Melchor Miralles (@Wikipedia)

On 1 November, Melchor Miralles, the ex-director of Mundo TV (Spain) and present director general of Atar Productions, received several calls threatening him with extortion and kidnapping.  He was located in Tapachula, Chiapas, with five other Spanish journalists to collect information regarding the migration of Central Americans toward the U.S. on the southern Mexican border.  They have all decided to leave Mexico.  The Federal Police and agents from the Special Prosecutorial Office for Crimes Committed against Migrants from the Chiapas state Attorney General’s Office (PGJE) provided a security escort for their departure.

In an article entitled “Hell” published in his column “On the sidewalk” on the Spanish daily Republica.com, Miralles noted that “It is no consolation, but the corruption in this country is a joke compared with the processes that have converted Mexico not into a failed state, but rather into a comatose state that has been taken over or handed over entirely to organized crime.”

En un artículo titulado “El Infierno” publicado en su columna denominada “En el andén” del diario español Republica. com, Miralles expresó: : “No consuela, pero nuestra corrupción es una broma si la comparamos con la que ha convertido a México no en un Estado fallido, sino en un Estado comatoso en el que los tres poderes están tomados, o entregados, al crimen organizado que todo lo puede”.

For more information (in Spanish):

El infierno (En el Anden, Reforma.com, 2 de noviembre de 2014)

Periodistas españoles huyen del país tras recibir amenazas de secuestro (Proceso, 3 de noviembre de 2014)

Periodistas españoles salen de Chiapas ante amenazas (Milenio, 3 de noviembre de 2014)

Españoles dejan el país ante amenaza (El Universal, 4 de noviembre de 2014)


National/International: civil organizations and Mexican State before the IACHR

November 12, 2014

 índice

During the last week of October, at least 20 Mexican civil organizations testified at five audiences before the Inter-American Commission on Human Rights (IACHR) in Washington, D.C., to denounce past cases of impunity as well as current human-rights violations and the criminalization of social protest in the country.

The first audience had been requested by the Mexican government to present the National Program on Human Rights.  At the doors of the hall where the audience was to be held, dozens of protestors were assembled, holding photos of the 43 disappeared normalist students from Ayotzinapa.  They received the Mexican governmental delegation with the slogan, “Alive you took them; alive we want them back!”  Lía Limón García, subsecretary on Juridical Affairs and Human Rights from the Secretary of Governance (SEGOB), recognized that Mexico is experiencing a time that challenges the normative advances made by the country’s government in recent years, and she affirmed that “the Mexican State will not rest until we find the normalist students.”

The Mexican civil-society organizations denounced for their part that “the humanitarian crisis confronting the country due to testimonies and denunciations of the disappeared, murdered, displaced, tortured, and injured have been ignored, covered up, and reduced to mere statistics by the government.”  They indicated that “the government’s efforts are focused on demonstrating the ‘Mexican moment’ of supposed progress and welfare.”  They also accused the State of “being responsible for the perpetration and perpetuation of grave, generalized, and systematic human-rights violations.”

Cases of disappearances and execution of persons from the 1960s, 1970s, and 1980s were also discussed, with this period of time being stressed as featuring “the connection between impunity for crimes committed during the badly named Dirty War and what is now happening in Mexico.”

The executive secretary of the IACHR, Emilio Álvarez Icaza (Mexican), lamented that the forcible disappearances recur as practices in the country, and he affirmed that “the events of Ayotzinapa, Tlatlaya, and Puebla are lamentable, but so is the fact that these types of crimes took place previously.  This is a worrying sign.”

Another audience addressed the restrictions on protest made by legislation and the human-rights violations associated with repression of protest-actions.  10 federal and local bills were discussed that would regulate and constrain mobilizations.

For more information (in Spanish):

El Estado mexicano presume avances en la CIDH, y ONG’s reviran: el país está en crisis (Sin Embargo, 4 de noviembre de 2014)

México solicita ayuda a la CIDH por Ayotzinapa (El Universal, 31 de octubre de 2014)

Plantea la CIDH dar asistencia técnica a México para buscar a los 43 desaparecidos (La Jornada, 31 de octubre de 2014)

No sólo es en Ayotzinapa, Tlatlaya y Puebla, es en todo el país, advierte la CIDH (Sin Embargo, 30 de octubre de 2014)

Abuchean a delegación mexicana en la CIDH por caso Iguala: “Regrésalos EPN” (Sin Embargo, 30 de octubre de 2014)

Posicionamiento de organizaciones de la sociedad civil sobre las graves violaciones de derechos humanos y la falta de respuestas del Estado mexicano (OSC, 30 de octubre de 2014)

Informe completo “Derechos Humanos y Protesta Social en México” (Frente por la libertad de expresión y la protesta social, octubre de 2014)

Para más información de SIPAZ:

Nacional: piden ONG a visita oficial de la CIDH a México ante la “crisis en derechos humanos” (14 de agosto de 2014)


Guerrero: CNDH investigates attacks on journalist from the Mountain region of Guerrero

November 12, 2014

Vehículo de la periodista Brenda Nava Mancilla (@libertadguerrero.net)

Automobile belonging to journalist Brenda Nava Mancilla (@libertadguerrero.net)

On 19 October, the personal vehicle of journalist Brenda Nava Mancilla, editor of La Noticia en La Montaña in the municipality of Tlapa de Comonfort and also a delegate to the Journalists’ Club of Guerrero A.C., was burned in an arson attack.  Journalistic sources claim that she had been threatened previously for having published reports on the Indigenous Maternal and Pediatric Hospital of Guerrero.  The National Commission on Human Rights (CNDH) has launched an investigation into the case.

For more information (in Spanish):

Investiga CNDH agresiones a periodista de Tlapa (Radio Formula, 30 de octubre de 2014)

Indaga CNDH amenazas contra periodista de Guerrero (MVS, 29 de octubre de 2014)

Amenazan e incendian camioneta de periodista en Guerrero (Animal Político, 20 de octubre de 2014)

For more information from SIPAZ (in English):

Guerrero: denunciation of intimidation against Proceso correspondent in the state (2 September 2014)

Guerrero: Attack by governor’s bodyguard on journalist from El Sur (2 May 2014)

National: Harassment of home of director of Article 19 shortly before publication of report “Dissent in silence: violence against the press and criminalization of protest, Mexico 2013″ (28 March 2014)


Chiapas: “Heart of memory, sown on our lands” event in Masoja Shucjá, Tila

November 12, 2014

“Corazón de memoria, sembrando en nuestro territorio”, octubre de 2014 (@CDHFBC)

“Heart of memory, sown on our lands.” October 2014 (@CDHFBC)

On 24 October, the “Heart of memory, sown on our lands” event was held in the Masojá Shucjá community, Tila municipality, in the northern zone of Chiapas, to remember the victims of execution, forcible disappearance, and forced displacement in this region between the years 1995 and 1999.  Those present demanded justice in these cases and expressed their solidarity with the families of the normalist students of Ayotzinapa, Guerrero.

The Fray Bartolomé de Las Casas Center for Human Rights, present at this event, stressed that “in the zone below Tila, [the paramilitary group] Paz y Justicia committed at least 37 forcible disappearances, 85 executions, and displaced more than 4500 persons, who also suffered harassment, intimidation, destruction of property, torture, sexual abuse, and arbitrary arrests, among other human-rights violations […].  Lamentably, these great human-right violations have continued to enjoy impunity, given that the material and intellectual authors have not been truly investigated or sanctioned in accordance with their involvement in these crimes against humanity.  This situation has been broadly denounced, and it has been taken to the Inter-American Commission on Human Rights.  There have been eight cases that reflect the atrocities experienced in the region.  There are 122 cases documented by this Center of Human Rights in the northern zone.  They are examples of the counter-insurgent strategy that has been implemented by the federal and state authorities, following the Plan for the Chiapas Campaign […].  Neither forgiveness nor forgetting.”

For more information (in Spanish):

A 18 años de impunidad, en Masojá Shucjá Tila Chiapas, exigen justicia por desapariciones y ejecuciones a sus integrantes (Chiapas Paralelo, 31 de octubre de 2014)

Boletín del CDHFBC Ni perdón, ni olvido (CDHFBC, 28 de octubre de 2014)

A 18 años de impunidad, en Masojá Shucjá Tila Chiapas, exigen justicia por desapariciones y ejecuciones a sus integrantes (Radio Pozol, 25 de octubre de 2014)

Castigo a autores de ejecuciones, desapariciones y desplazamientos forzados en Chiapas: Desplazados de Banavil (Comunicado de las y los desplazados de Banavil en el evento de Masoja Shucjá, 24 de octubre de 2014)

For more information from SIPAZ (in English):

Chiapas: 18 years since the disappearance of Minerva Pérez, her case remains unpunished (25 June 2014)

Chiapas: 17 years after the forced disappearance of Minerva Guadalupe Pérez Torres, her case is taken up at the IACHR (25 June 2013)

Chiapas: 16 years of impunity in the case of the forced disappearance of Minerva Guadalupe Pérez Torres (25 June 2012)

Chiapas: Masojá Shucjá, commemoration of the victims of the victims of the conflict of ’95 and ’96 (7 October 2011)


Guerrero: Update in the Iguala case: former Iguala mayor is arrested; governor of Guerrero resigns; European Parliament divided over Ayotzinapa

November 3, 2014

DSCF2998

Mobilization “A light for Ayotzinapa” in San Cristóbal de Las Casas. Photo@SIPAZ

On 22 October, the protest-day “A light for Ayotzinapa” was held in dozens of cities in Mexico and abroad.  In Mexico City itself, 50,000 participated in the march, according to city authorities.  In Iguala, protestors marched the same route taken by the normalist students before they were attacked by police.  In Chiapas, the Zapatista Army of National Liberation (EZLN) carried out a prayer and protest.  Furthermore, thousands of citizens, including students and teachers, participated in the mobilizations in several cities of the state.  Students from different educational centers throughout the world joined the action, manifesting themselves in their countries for the disappearances of the 43 students.

On 23 October, Navy units arrested José Luis Abarca, former mayor of Iguala, and his wife Maria de Los Ángeles Pineda Villa, who have been indicated by the Federal Attorney General’s Office (PGR) as those who ordered the disappearance of the 43 students on 26 September.  Following their arrest, they were required to declare themselves before the Specialized Subprosecutorial Office for Investigations into Organized Crime (SEIDO).  The arrest was executed by the Navy with support from the PGR in a hotel in the capital of Veracruz state.

Also on 23 October, following weeks of calls to this end from all standpoints, Ángel Aguirre Rivero, governor of Guerrero, publicly announced his resignation before the state congress over the Iguala case.  He began the announcement by summarizing the advances his administration had made in the Iguala case, though he did not provide any information regarding the actual whereabouts of the disappeared.  In fact, the administration of Ángel Aguirre Rivero began with the murder of two other normalist students from Ayotzinapa: Gabriel Echeverría de Jesús and Jorge Alexis Herrera Pino were shot dead by federal and ministerial police on the Sol Highway on 12 December as they were clearing a blockade. This case continues in impunity.

The same day, nine new mass-gravesites were located in the La Parota zone near Iguala by communards who are members of the Union of Peoples and Organizations from Guerrero State (UPOEG).  They referred their findings to the federal police for investigation.

In other news, the European Parliament on 23 October approved a resolution condemning the events in Iguala that calls for the European Union (EU) to restrengthen its cooperation with Mexico in terms of human rights.  The resolution demands the continuation of investigations “until the students [are found to be] safe,” lamenting the “apparent infiltration of organized crime in local police and administrative organizations.”  The resolution presented the government of Enrique Peña Nieto as a victim of organized crime, and not as a principally responsible party in the acts.  In this sense, the European Green Party and the Unified European Left/Nordic Greens decided to distance themselves from this declaration and instead released their own proposal for resolution.  Both groups support the intervention in Mexico of the International Criminal Court (ICC) located in the Hague, as well as the suspension of the bilateral Global Mexico-EU accord, security agreements, and the arms trade with Mexico.  This alternative resolution interprets the events of Ayotzinapa as a spiral of violence that originates in years of impunity and broken promises by Mexican authorities.

For more information (in Spanish):

Detiene a exedil de Iguala y a su esposa (Eje Central, 24 de cotubre de 2014)

Parlamento Europeo condena desaparición de normalistas (El Universal, 23 de octubre de 2014)

Rechaza Parlamento Europeo condenar a México (El Universal, 22 de octubre de 2014)

Se divide Parlamento Europeo por desapariciones en Ayotzinapa(Proceso, 22 de octubre de 2014)
Tomó por sorpresa a diputados decisión de Aguirre de renunciar: Campos Aburto (La Jornada de Guerrero, 24 de octubre de 2014)

Hallazgo de 9 fosas más en Iguala; “había mochilas y lapiceros”: UPOEG(Aristegui Noticias, 24 de octubre de 2014)

Cobertura de marcha por Ayotzinapa: padres dan plazo de 2 días a autoridades (La Jornada, 22 de octubre de 2014)

“Nuestra luz es una forma de abrazar a quienes hoy hacen falta”: EZLN (Chiapas Paralelo, 23 de octubre de 2014)

For more information from SIPAZ (in English):

Chiapas: New actions by the EZLN to support Ayotzinapa (26 October 2014)

Guerrero: Contradictory versions regarding findings from graves in Iguala three weeks after the forced disappearance of 43 students from Ayotzinapa – Protests are radicalized (26 October 2014)

National/International: Multiple mobilizations and marches for the “Pain” and “Rage” of Ayotzinapa (12 October 2014)

Guerrero: municipal police of Iguala fire on students of the Rural Normal School of Ayotzinapa. Six have died (11 October 2014)

Guerrero: Impunity continues in the Ayotzinapa case (17 May 2013)

Guerrero: Extrajudicial execution of students from the Rural Normal of Ayotzinapa (21 December 2011)


Chiapas: Tenth Meeting of Builders of Peace and Reconciliation

November 3, 2014

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Mayan altar to celebrate the conference. Photo@Sipaz

From 21 to 24 October, there was held the tenth Meeting of Builders of Peace and Reconciliation in the Tres Pozos community, Comitán municipality, as organized by the Commission for Support for Communal Unity and Reconciliation (CORECO).  Some 110 persons (66 men and 44 women) from 50 communities of 14 municipalities participated, in addition to representatives of civil organizations such as CORECO, Casa Kolping, SERAPAZ, and SIPAZ.  The space provided the opportunity to meet, exchange experiences, and to coordinate action for shared projects among those who works as builders of peace in their communities.  Beyond this, an analysis was made of the prevailing socio-political context in these communities.

IMGP8786

IMGP8810

In this sense, a pilgrimage was held on 22 October to observe the global call for action “A light for Ayotzinapa,” a call that was heard throughout Mexico as well as abroad to express solidarity with the victims of the events that took place on 26 and 27 in Iguala, Guerrero.  Participants at the Meeting said their farewells, having come to agreement to continue to work together.  It was decided that the next meeting would take place from 20 to 23 October 2015 in the Los Chorros community, Patwitz region, Ocosingo municipality.

For more information (in Spanish):

CORECO, A.C.

For more information from SIPAZ (in English):

Guerrero: Contradictory versions regarding findings from graves in Iguala three weeks after the forced disappearance of 43 students from Ayotzinapa – Protests are radicalized (26 October 2014)

National/International: Multiple mobilizations and marches for the “Pain” and “Rage” of Ayotzinapa (12 October 2014)

Guerrero: municipal police of Iguala fire on students of the Rural Normal School of Ayotzinapa. Six have died (11 October 2014)


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