Chiapas: The EZLN announces new activities, meeting of indigenous peoples, and “Ethics amidst looting”

April 10, 2014


DSCF0271

In a March 2014 communique, the Zapatista Army of National Liberation (EZLN) announced a series of activities for the months of May and June.

From 26 to 30 May will take place the meeting of indigenous peoples: “At this meeting we will exchange our thought and history of struggle and resistance as indigenous that we are.”  Some 30 peoples have been invited, including the Wixárika, Nahua, Zoque, Purépecha, Mazahua, Afromestizo, Triqui, Peninsular Maya, Tzotzil, Tzeltal, Chol, Zoque, and migrants.  The letter stresses that the “invitation is closed and is ONLY for the indigenous peoples invited during this first round.  Those who are not invited will not be allowed to enter.”

In other news, “On Saturday 31 May 2014 in the Oventik caracol, we will announce together with our brothers and sisters from other indigenous communities our conclusions and a declaration for future plans in terms of resistance against the looting which we suffer, as well as our rights and indigenous culture.”

Furthermore, “Sunday 1 June 2014, also in the Oventik caracol, we will make a simple homage to our fallen comrade Don Luis Villoro Toranzo.  This event is open and all are invited to attend.  The event will take place at approximately 2pm, and female and male commanders from the Revolutionary Clandestine Indigenous Committee-General Command of the EZLN, the writer Juan Villoro, and Subcomandante Insurgente Moisés will participate.”

In the end will be held a final activity: “From Monday 2 June 2014 until Sunday 8 June of this year, there will be held in the Oventik caracol and at CIDECI in San Cristóbal de Las Casas, Chiapas, a seminar on the question of ‘ETHICS AMIDST LOOTING,’ which will also commemorate our comrade Don Luis Villoro Toranzo.  This seminar is open and all are invited.”

For more information (in Spanish):

Anuncia EZLN encuentro de pueblos; irá ‘Marcos’ “si su salud se lo permite”, La Jornada, 1 de abril de 2014

EL EZLN ANUNCIA ACTIVIDADES CON PUEBLOS ORIGINARIOS, HOMENAJE A DON LUIS VILLORO Y SEMINARIO SOBRE “ÉTICA FRENTE AL DESPOJO”, ASÍ COMO NUEVA INICIATIVA PARA LA SEXTA NACIONAL E INTERNACIONAL, Enlace Zapatista, 31 de marzo de 2014

For more information from SIPAZ (in English):

Chiapas: Presentation of new EZLN magazine (2 March 2014)

Chiapas: Celebration of 20 years since the Zapatista uprising (15 January 2014)

Chiapas/National: “Rebobinar 2: On Death and other excuses” (1 January 2014)

Chiapas: New communique from Subcomandante Marcos, Rebobine 3 (7 December 2013)

Chiapas: EZLN criticizes structural reforms (13 November 2013)

Chiapas: Tens of thousands of Zapatistas mobilize themselves in 5 cities (27 December 2012)


Chiapas: Denunciation from and announcement of action on part of the displaced from Banavil and the Aurora Ermita ejido

April 10, 2014

Conferencia de prensa, 31 de marzo de 2014 (@CDHFBC)

Press conference, 31 March 2014 (@CDHFBC)

On 31 March there was held a press conference which featured the displaced from Banavil (Tenejapa municipality) and from the Aurora Ermita ejido (Pueblo Nuevo Solistahuacán municipality), as well as representatives from the Coordination Table for the Defense of Human Rights.  They denounced the conditions of displacement which they currently suffer, and in light of the lack of responses from the authorities, they reported that on 4 April 2014 they would hold a march in San Cristóbal de Las Casas to demand their rights.

In the Banavil case, they denounced that “nearly a month after Alonso Guzmán López was imprisoned, the PRI is threatening relatives of the displaced by fabricating crimes so as to return them to prison because they supposedly have contact with governmental officials who sell themselves to incarcerate innocent persons.  Meanwhile, ten arrest orders have yet to completed against the aggressors of 4 December 2011.”  In the case of the Aurora Ermita ejido, they noted that “there are nine arrest-orders against the aggressors; two are imprisoned, so seven are left.”

They called on the government to soon return the displaced from Banavil and Aurora Ermita; to apply justice against those who have arrest-orders against them; to guarantee their security upon their return, so that these acts not recur; to clarify the disappearance of Alonso López Luna, an EZLN sympathizer from Banavil; and to comprehensively compensate the two groups of displaced, as mandated by the United Nations.

For more information (in Spanish):

Crean en Chiapas ONG en defensa de desplazados (La Jornada, 1ero de abril de 2014)

Comunicado de la Mesa de Coordinación por la Defensa de los Derechos Humanos en contra del desplazamiento forzado de las personas desplazadas de Banavil (31 de marzo de 2014)

Video de la conferencia de prensa (Koman Ilel, 31 de marzo de 2014)

Audio de la conferencia de prensa (Radio Pozol, 31 de marzo de 2014)

For more information from SIPAZ (in English):

Chiapas: Two years after the attack in Banavil, displacement and forced disappearance live on,” CDHFBC (9 December 2013)

Chiapas: Public denunciation from those displaced from Banavil (16 September 2013)

Chiapas: The displaced of Banavil, Tenejapa in “precarious and inhumane conditions” (8 April 2013)

Chiapas: CDHFBC published more information on the Banavil case, Tenejapa (9 February 2012)


National/International: End of solidarity week “If the Zapatistas are harmed, all are harmed”

March 2, 2014

Imagen @ Red contra la Represión

From 16 to 23 February there was held the National and International Week of Solidarity “If one Zapatista is harmed, all are harmed” as organized by adherents to the Sixth Declaration of the Lacandona Jungle.  During these days were celebrated different activities in different parts of Mexico, Europe, North America, and New Zealand, all to express solidarity with Zapatista support bases (BAEZLN).

“Oftentimes power has attempted without success to provoke and destroy the organization and project of the Zapatistas, using military overflights or invasion, looting of land, introduction of social programs in Zapatista territory, fabrication of crimes, robbery, arbitrary arrest, and paramilitary attacks,” the adherents noted in a communique.

The week of solidarity was a response to the recent attacks on the 10 April ejido, as denounced by the Heart of the Rainbow of Hope Good-Government Council, as was expressed in the organizing call for the week: “The criminal group of the Center of Agricultural and Campesino Workers (CIOAC) together with the Regional Organization of Coffee Cultivators of Ocosingo (ORCAO) left six Zapatista comrades gravely injured, and they harassed and robbed personnel from the San Carlos hospital.”

For more information (in Spanish):

RvsR: Semana Nacional e Internacional de Solidaridad “Si tocan a l@s zapatistas, nos tocan a tod@s” (Enlace Zapatista, 13 de febrero de 2014)

Actividades de la Semana Nacional e Internacional de Solidaridad “Si tocan a l@s zapatistas, nos tocan a tod@s” (Enlace Zapatista, 20 de febrero de 2014)

For more information from SIPAZ (in English):

Chiapas: Denunciations of attacks on BAEZLN from the Morelia JBG and on hospital personnel from San Carlos de Altamirano (7 February 2014)

Chiapas: Denunciation of harassment and attacks from the Whirlwind of Our Words Caracol (7 December 2013)

 


Chiapas: 18 años years after the signing of the San Andrés Accords on Indigenous Rights and Culture, these continue not to be recognized by the State

March 1, 2014

Comisión del EZLN en los Acuerdos de San Andrés

On 16 February 18 years passed since the signing of the San Andrés Accords on Indigenous Rights and Culture between the federal government and the Zapatista Army of National Liberation (EZLN), within the context of the Law on Dialogue, Negotiation, and Dignified Peace in Chiapas.

The signing of the accords in the Tsotsil community of San Andrés Larráinzar or Sak´am Ch´en De Los Pobres was the result of a process of negotiations and dialogues which began in October 1995 and ended in February 1996 in which particiapted different actors from Mexican civil society, including the National Commission on Mediation (CONAI), presided over by bishop Samuel Ruíz, and the Commission for Concordance and Pacification (COCOPA), comprised of legislators from the federal and state congresses.

By signing the accords, the federal government committed itself to constitutionally recognize the indigenous peoples by means of the creation of a new juridical system that would guarantee the political representation of the indigenous at the local and national levels, the right for the indigenous to organize and rule themselves according to their own customs, their right to develop their own alternatives to economic development and production, and the right for them to preserve their own cultural identity.  In sum, the agreement recognized the indigenous peoples of Mexico as public participants with the capacity of organizing themselves autonomously.

In November 1996, the COCOPA presented the Proposal for Constitutional Reforms in terms of Indigenous Rights and Culture as a continuation of the agreements made in San Andrés. Though some of the aspects originally agreed to were missing in this new version, the EZLN accepted the proposed document.

In December 2000, the PAN government of Vicente Fox submitted the law to the federal congress.

In 2001, the federal senate approved the constitutional reform on indigenous affairs, with the majority vote from the deputies of the principal political parties (PAN, PRI, PRD), though this did not include that which was agreed to in San Andrés. The reform stressed the effective exercise of rights, defining indigenous communities as public-interest entities instead of public-right entities, with the latter being a stipulation from the San Andrés Accords.  In this way was it denied to the indigenous to participate autonomously and collectively in the decision-making structures of the political and juridical institutions of the Mexican State, thus limiting their ability to organize autonomously in accordance with their own uses and customs.

In response to the reform, both the National Indigenous Congress (CNI) and the EZLN rejected the approved law, considering it to be a treason from the political parties toward the indigenous, and dialogue with the government was broken off until such time as the San Andrés Accords be included within the Mexican constitution as stipulated in the COCOPA Law.

Lastly, in December 2013, Jaime Martínez Veloz, commissioner for Dialogue with Indigenous Peoples, announced that the Secretary of Governance would present in early 2014 a legal initiative that rescues the content of the  San Andrés Accords and would serve to reactivate the dialogue which had been suspended since 2001 between the Zapatistas and the government. For Martínez Veloz, the legislative reforms in indigenous affairs from 2001 did not resolve “the problems of the indigenous peoples in a profound way.”

For more information (in Spanish):

Los Acuerdos de San Andrés, pacto inédito entre los pueblos indios de México, cumplen 18 años de vigencia (Desinformémonos, febrero de 2014)

Acuerdos de San Andrés. A veinte años del alzamiento (Mirada Sur, febrero de 2014)

Acuerdos de San Andrés: avatares internacionales (La Jornada, 11 de febrero de 2014)

A 18 años de los Acuerdos de San Andrés (Chiapas Paralelo, 17 de febrero de 2014)

Peña prepara ley que retoma los acuerdos de San Andrés (ADN Político, 31 de diciembre de 2013)

Para más información de SIPAZ:

Chiapas: new governor calls for observance of San Andrés Accords (8 January 2013)

National: Reactions by state and federal governments to the Zapatista mobilization of 21 December (27 December 2012)


Chiapas: Celebration of 20 years since the Zapatista uprising

January 15, 2014

Año nuevo en Caracol III Resistencia hacia un nuevo amanecer @ SIPAZ

New year’s in Caracol III Resistance until a new dawn @ SIPAZ

On 31 December 2013 and 1 January 2014, the Zapatista Army of National Liberation (EZLN) celebrated its twenty-year anniversary of resistance since its insurrection on 1 January 1994, which demanded land, food, work, health, education, housing, justice, and equality for indigenous peoples.  The uprising coincided with the entrance into law of the North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA).  There were celebrations in the five caracoles, with sports games, dance, and food.  At 12am, the Mexican and Zapatista flags were presented, while both anthems were sung, as followed by the reading of a communique which mentioned those who are not present, such as Subcomandante Pedro and Comandanta Ramona; as each name was read, a “presente” could be heard cried out.

20 years since its armed uprising, the EZLN spoke to its successes.  With regard to health, for example, the Zapatistas have constructed four regional hospitals staffed with surgeons, some of them specializing in reproductive and sexual health, in addition to dozens of municipal clinics, and it estimated that more than 1100 widwives and 1500 herbalists have been trained in this period.

“20 years ago we threw the political parties into the trashcan.  We are trying to improve our health, educational, and governmental systems.  We know that much remains to be done, but we also know that our struggle will continue,” read Comandanta Hortensia in Caracol II Resistance and Rebellion for Humanity.  She added: “We exist and continue here.  20 years ago we had nothing, no system or educational systems based in the people.  There was no governmental authority of the people.  Now we have our own autonomous governments.  Whether it be good or bad, it has been based on the will of the people.”

The bishop from Saltillo, Raúl Vera, indicated that “the rendering visible of the demands and needs of the indigenous peoples of the country who have been among the most marginalized sectors in historical terms has perhaps been the greatest contribution made by the Zapatista Army of National Liberation (EZLN), whose social and political proposals have transformed Mexico and continue to be relevant, though this group does not for the moment dominate the media’s attention.”  With the public appearance of the EZLN in January 1994, the conscience was awakened that “we Mexicans cannot continue being inactive.  We learned from our indigenous brothers [and sisters] that democracy cannot be attained without efforts and sacrifices, that we will not get out of this if we do not move ourselves from the base, as they have done.”

For more information (in Spanish):

Dar a conocer necesidades indígenas, principal aportación zapatista: Vera(La Jornada, 2 de diciembre de 2014)

Los combates duraron 12 días; la lucha sigue (La Jornada, 31 de diciembre de 2013)

Lanza EZLN nuevo llamado a la rebeldía (Proceso, 1 de enero de 2014)

EZLN gobierna a 250 mil indígenas (Red política, 2 de enero de 2014)

El Ya basta! en América Latina (La Jornada, 27 de diciembre de 2013)

For more information from SIPAZ (in English):

Chiapas: Tens of thousands of Zapatistas mobilize themselves in 5 cities (27 December 2012)

Chiapas: Communiqué by the EZLN: For reflective criticism, individuals and collectives (15 April 2011)


Chiapas/National: EZLN communique, “When the dead cry aloud (Rebobinar 1)”

January 1, 2014

índice

On 28 December, mere days before the anniversary of the insurrection undertaken by the Zapatista Army of National Liberation (EZLN), Subcomandante Marcos released a new communique entitled “When the dead cry aloud (Rebobinar 1).”  In this essay, he notes that “rebelliousness is not the exclusive patrimony of the neo-Zapatistas.  It belongs to humanity, and  so is something to celebrate everywhere, at all times.  Rebellion itself is a celebration.”

Marcos challenges the truthfulness of biographies and denounces that, given the Internet and social media, “biographical myths revolve their fallacies around, and voilá, the history of one’s life (or part of it) is reconstructed, having little to nothing to do with actual history.  But this does not matter, because the biography is published, printed, circulated, read, re-read… just as lies are.”  As illustration of his point, Marcos recalled the things which could be read about ex-presidents Carlos Salinas de Gortari, Ernesto Zedillo, Vicente Fox, Felipe Calderón, and current president Enrique Peña Nieto.  He stressed that the “criminals of the Mexican political class who have so badly governed these lands will continue to be criminals who enjoy impunity for those who have suffered their outrages.”  He concluded by saying that “with all this and what is coming, am I saying that one should not write or read biographies?  No, because that which drives the old wheel of history are collectives, not individuals, whether male or female.  Historiography develops through individuals; history learns from the people.”

In a large post-script, Marcos challenged the commercial media and a number of articles which have been published in anticipation of the anniversary of the armed uprising: “if the conditions of the Zapatista indigenous communities are the same as they were 20 years ago and no living conditions have improved, why is the EZLN opening its escuelita so that people from below see it and come to know it directly, without intermediaries? [...] You ask what the EZLN has done for indigenous communities.  And we are responding with the direct testimony of tens of thousands of our comrades.”  It should be recalled that, just earlier, Subcomandante Moisés announced that the press will not be invited to the Zapatista celebrations.

For more information (in Spanish):

Rebobinar 1: Cuando los muertos callan en voz alta (Subcomandante Marcos, 28 de diciembre de 2013)

La rebeldía, patrimonio de la humanidad; hay que celebrarlo siempre: vocero del EZLN (La Jornada, 30 de diciembre de 2013)

Lanza EZLN comunicado “hace frío como hace 20 años” (El Universal, 29 de diciembre de 2013)

“Hace frío como hace 20 años”: ‘Subcomandante Marcos’ (Aristegui Noticias, 29 de diciembre de 2013)

Para más información de SIPAZ:

Chiapas/National: “Rebobinar 2: On Death and other excuses” (1 January 2014)

Chiapas: New communique from Subcomandante Marcos, Rebobine 3 (7 December 2013)

Chiapas: EZLN criticizes structural reforms (13 November 2013)

Chiapas: EZLN denounces nocturnal military overflights above Zapatista caracoles (21 August 2013)

Chiapas: Celebration of the tenth anniversary of the Zapatista caracoles(21 August 2013)


Chiapas/National: “Rebobinar 2: On death and other excuses”

January 1, 2014

(@archivos SIPAZ)

(@SIPAZ archive)

On 22 December there appeared a new communique from Subcomandante Marcos, spokesperson for the Zapatista Army of National Liberation (EZLN), entitled “Rebobinar 2: On Death and other excuses,” which criticizes the recently approved structural changes in Mexico, particularly with regards to energy and education.  He assured that the “modern golden liquid, water and petroleum, have been stolen without a mention from the massive media.”  Marcos challenged the energy reform, indicating it as being “dressed up looting” and “treason to the Nation.”

Furthermore, in a PS, he criticized the wastefulness of promotional media campaigns spent by the present Chiapas state governor (more than $10 million) by calling it “ridiculous” and “illegal”; Marcos sees it as an attempt to hide “misery, the paramilitaries, and the crime rates in the main Chiapas cities” from tourists: “the so-called governor of Chiapas, Mexico, has solemnly declared that his administration ‘has tightened its belt’ by means of austerity programs.  As an illustration of this decision, more than $10 million have been spent on a national publicity campaign that… is ridiculous and illegal.”

For more information (in Spanish):

Rebobinar 2: de la muerte y otras coartadas (Subcomandante Marcos, 22 de diciembre de 2013)

El despojo se cubre con mentiras como las mal llamadas reformas (La Jornada, 24 de diciembre de 2013)

La reforma energética es un “despojo disfrazado”: Marcos (Proceso, 23 de diciembre de 2013)

Subcomandante Marcos publica comunicado a 20 años del alzamiento en Chiapas (BBC Mundo, 23 de diciembre de 2013)

For more information from SIPAZ (in English):

Chiapas: New communique from Subcomandante Marcos, Rebobine 3 (7 December 2013)

Chiapas: EZLN criticizes structural reforms (13 November 2013)

Chiapas: EZLN denounces nocturnal military overflights above Zapatista caracoles (21 August 2013)

Chiapas: Celebration of the tenth anniversary of the Zapatista caracoles(21 August 2013)


Chiapas: Manuel Velasco presents his first Governmental Report

January 1, 2014

016n1pol-1

Photo @La Jornada

On 19 December, Manuel Velasco Coello, governor of Chiapas, presented his first government report before the state congress.  At the Mesoamerican Poliforum located in the state’s capital, Velasco Coello alluded to the challenges that had marked the beginning of his term, and he recalled that a year ago the state of Chiapas faced the worst financial crisis in its history.  He recognized that the debts owed by the Chiapas state governments to indigenous communities has yet to be resolved.  “I here repeat that my administration will retain its commitment to respecting Zapatismo and to resolving conflicts peacefully.  My position has been and remains clear: we have a moral debt with the indigenous peoples of Chiapas and Mexico which we should resolve with justice and dignity.”  He also mentioned that work is being done to release two prisoners who pertain to San Sebastián Bachajón.

In a communique, the Zapatista Army of National Liberation (EZLN) criticized the public budget outlined by the governor in his first Governmental Report.  The EZLN notes that Velasco repeats and builds upon the strategy of former Governor Juan Sabines to spend greatly on communication media.  “Over $10 million have been spent on a national promotional campaign which is no less ridiculous… or illegal for being massive and expensive.”  Journalist Carmen Aristegui strongly criticized Manuel Velasco ‘s media campaign on radio, denouncing the campaign which seeks to promote Velasco’s image as governor and future politician for spending so many public funds.  Similar views were expressed on a program in Univisión News on 20 December.

For more information (in Spanish):

Critica EZLN gasto de gobernador (AM, 23 de diciembre de 2013)

Discurso de Manuel Velasco en su primer informe de gobierno (Chiapas Paralelo, 19 de diciembre de 2013)

Manuel Velasco presenta hoy su primer Informe (El Universal, 19 de diciembre de 2013)

Escándalo envuelve a gobernador de Chiapas (Noticias Univisión, 21 de diciembre de 2013)

Aristegui se le va a la yugular a Manuel Velasco Gobernador de Chiapas(TVNWS, 19 de diciembre de 2013)

La seguridad y el tráfico de armas y drogas, temas que vinculan a Chiapas y Chihuahua (La Jornada, 20 de diciembre de 2013)

For more information from SIPAZ (in English):

Chiapas: accession of Manuel Velasco Coello to governorship (10 de diciembre de 2013)

Chiapas: elections in Chiapas; PRI-Green alliance wins (10 July 2012)


Chiapas: Preaudience of the Permanent Tribunal of the People in Susuclumil, Tila

December 17, 2013

Conferencia de prensa donde leyeron el Dictamen del TPP

On 6 and 7 December 2013 in the community of Susuclumil, Tila, Chiapas, there was held a pre-audience for the Mexico chapter of the People’s Permanent Tribunal (TPP), part of the “Focus on Dirty War – violence, impunity, and lack of access to justice.”  Relatives of victims, survivors, and those displaced from the Northern Zone and Highlands of Chiapas presented their word regarding the “victims of the counter-insurgent and extermination strategies contemplated in the Plan for Chiapas Campaign 94 which was implemented by the Mexican government following the insurrection of the Zapatista Army of National Liberation (EZLN) in 1994, which resulted in dozens of forced disappearances, murders, force displacements, rapes, and massacres; all of these are crimes against humanity which continue to go unpunished.”

In the event, there were presented testimonies regarding the extrajudicial executions and forced disappearances committed during the second half of the 1990s in the zone below Tila, in addition to the forced displacements of the communities of Chuctiejá, Miguel Alemán, Jolnixtié I Sección, Masojá Shuchá, El Limar, and Masojá Grande. The Fray Bartolomé de Las Casas Center for Human Rights has documented 85 extrajudicial executions, 35 forced disappearances, and at least 3500 displaced persons during this time in the northern zone of Chiapas.

The ruling of the TPP, also presented in a press-conference in San Cristobal de las Casas on 9 December, stresses that “We have heard the pain, fear, and injustice of the looting experienced and suffered by the survivors of extrajudicial executions, torture, forced disappearances, forced displacement, rape, looting of resources and land as a consequence of the actions taken by the Mexican government [...].  The Mexican State is responsible at the three levels of government, as originating in the security forces at the state, municipal, and Army levels, for they gave support and economic aid to paramilitary groups, particularly the grouping named ‘Development, Peace, and Justice’ [...].  From the evidence which speak to these human-rights violations, crimes against humanity and genocide can be seen in the policies exercised against the indigenous Ch’ol, Tzotzil, and Tseltal peoples.  These actions continue to the present day, when we celebrate this pre-audience.”

For more information (in Spanish):

La guerra contra el EZLN, las otras víctimas (Parte 1), Chiapas paralelo, 10 de diciembre de 2013

Siguen impunes crímenes en Chiapas (El Universal, 9 de diciembre de 2013)

Inicia preaudiencia del Tribunal Permanente de Pueblos en Tila, Chiapas (La Jornada, 9 de diciembre de 2013)

Dictamen de la preaudiencia en Chiapas

For more information from SIPAZ (in English):

Chiapas: Invitation to attend the preaudience “Meeting for justice and truth” in Susuclumil, Tila municipality (8 December 2013)

Chiapas: PUDEE denounces “climate of violence” generated by the CFE in the zone below Tila (11 de abril de 2013)

Chiapas: 16 years of impunity in the case of the forced disappearance of Minerva Guadalupe Pérez Torres (25 June 2012)

Chiapas: Masojá Shucjá, commemoration of the victims of the victims of the conflict of ’95 and ’96 (7 October 2011)

Chiapas: in Masojá Shucjá, memory and demand for justice for the victims of paramilitaries in 1995 and 1996 (7 October 2010)

Chiapas: 14 years after the forced disappearance of Minerva Pérez Torres by Paz y Justicia paramilitaries (30 June 2010)


Chiapas: “Two years after the attack in Banavil, displacement and forced disappearance live on,” CDHFBC

December 9, 2013

Conferencia de prensa Caso Banavil(@CDHFBC)

Press-conference in the Banavil case(@CDHFBC)

In a press conference held on 5 December, the Fray Bartolomé de Las Casas Center for Human Rights (CDHFBC) denounced that “two years after the armed attack which took place in Banavil, Tenejapa, as perpetrated by a group of members of the Institutional Revolutionary Party (PRI), which resulted in death, a forced disappearance, arbitrary arrests, and forced displacements, the situation continues without resolution.”  The CDHFBC noted that “the four families (14 persons) who sympathize with the Zapatista Army of National Liberation (EZLN) continue to be displaced, living in inhuman conditions in San Cristóbal de Las Casas.”

The displaced and the CDHFBC demanded among other things that the conditions be provided which would facilitate the return of the four displaced families to their community, in addition to the release of arrest-orders against the 13 persons accused of forcibly disappearing Alonso López Luna and injuring Lorenzo López Girón.

For more information (in Spanish):

Boletín: A dos años de la agresión en Banavil, continúa el desplazamiento y la desaparición forzada (CDHFBC, 5 de diciembre de 2013)

Indígenas desplazados de Banavil, simpatizantes del EZLN, exigen condiciones para su retorno (Chiapas Paralelo, 6 de diciembre de 2013)

Denuncian a fiscal especializado indígena de Chiapas por incumplir aprehensiones (La Jornada, 7 de diciembre de 2013)

For more information from SIPAZ (in English):

Chiapas: Public denunciation from those displaced from Banavil (16 September 2013)

Chiapas: The displaced of Banavil, Tenejapa in “precarious and inhumane conditions” (8 April 2013)

Chiapas: CDHFBC published more information on the Banavil case, Tenejapa (9 February 2012)


Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 67 other followers