International/National: IACHR presents report regarding right to truth which includes the case of the “Dirty War” in Mexico

December 16, 2014

index

At the end of November, the Inter-American Commission on Human Rights (IACHR) published a report regarding the right to truth in Latin America “in light of the enormous challenges that many States of the region confront with regard to guaranteeing the rights of thousands of victims after periods of dictatorship, armed internal conflicts, and generalized violence.”

The report analyzes several cases, emphasizing “the obligations that the States have in reagrd to the objective of guaranteeing the right to truth in terms of grave human-rights violations.”  In the specific case of Mexico, the report makes reference to the creation of a Special Prosecutorial Office for Past Social and Political Movements (FEMOSPP), which seeks to investigate what happened in 532 cases of disappeared and arrested individuals.  It recalls that “on 15 December 2005, a group of investigators submitted a draft of the report.  However, to date, the report has not been made public, and it can only be found online, as published by the National Security Archive.”

In observance of the presentation of the report, Emilio Alvarez Icaza, Executive Secretary for the IACHR, stressed that “this report is a contribution that compiles the jurisprudence of the Inter-American legal system regarding the obligations States have in terms of truth, justice, and compensation for victims of past [crimes].  But it is not a report which deals only with the past, for it is also a contribution to the present, so as to assist from our place and mandate the democracies of today to advance with their pending debts.  It is also a contribution to the future.  The guarantee to the right to truth permits the construction of a future exempt from these types of abuses.”

For more information (in Spanish):

Derecho a la verdad en América: Informe Completo (CIDH)

Urge CIDH a erradicar desapariciones forzadas en América (El Universal, 27 de noviembre de 2014)

CIDH presenta informe sobre el Derecho a la Verdad en América (Boletín de prensa de la CIDH, 27 de noviembre de 2014)

CIDH presenta informe sobre el derecho a la Verdad; retoma el caso de la FEMOSPP en México (Centro Prodh, 2 de diciembre de 2014)

For more information from SIPAZ (in English):

Chiapas: TPP preaudience judges Mexican State for crimes against humanity (27 July 2014)

Guerrero: Death-threats directed against two activists with the Truth Commission (7 February 2013)

 


National/International: civil organizations and Mexican State before the IACHR

November 12, 2014

 índice

During the last week of October, at least 20 Mexican civil organizations testified at five audiences before the Inter-American Commission on Human Rights (IACHR) in Washington, D.C., to denounce past cases of impunity as well as current human-rights violations and the criminalization of social protest in the country.

The first audience had been requested by the Mexican government to present the National Program on Human Rights.  At the doors of the hall where the audience was to be held, dozens of protestors were assembled, holding photos of the 43 disappeared normalist students from Ayotzinapa.  They received the Mexican governmental delegation with the slogan, “Alive you took them; alive we want them back!”  Lía Limón García, subsecretary on Juridical Affairs and Human Rights from the Secretary of Governance (SEGOB), recognized that Mexico is experiencing a time that challenges the normative advances made by the country’s government in recent years, and she affirmed that “the Mexican State will not rest until we find the normalist students.”

The Mexican civil-society organizations denounced for their part that “the humanitarian crisis confronting the country due to testimonies and denunciations of the disappeared, murdered, displaced, tortured, and injured have been ignored, covered up, and reduced to mere statistics by the government.”  They indicated that “the government’s efforts are focused on demonstrating the ‘Mexican moment’ of supposed progress and welfare.”  They also accused the State of “being responsible for the perpetration and perpetuation of grave, generalized, and systematic human-rights violations.”

Cases of disappearances and execution of persons from the 1960s, 1970s, and 1980s were also discussed, with this period of time being stressed as featuring “the connection between impunity for crimes committed during the badly named Dirty War and what is now happening in Mexico.”

The executive secretary of the IACHR, Emilio Álvarez Icaza (Mexican), lamented that the forcible disappearances recur as practices in the country, and he affirmed that “the events of Ayotzinapa, Tlatlaya, and Puebla are lamentable, but so is the fact that these types of crimes took place previously.  This is a worrying sign.”

Another audience addressed the restrictions on protest made by legislation and the human-rights violations associated with repression of protest-actions.  10 federal and local bills were discussed that would regulate and constrain mobilizations.

For more information (in Spanish):

El Estado mexicano presume avances en la CIDH, y ONG’s reviran: el país está en crisis (Sin Embargo, 4 de noviembre de 2014)

México solicita ayuda a la CIDH por Ayotzinapa (El Universal, 31 de octubre de 2014)

Plantea la CIDH dar asistencia técnica a México para buscar a los 43 desaparecidos (La Jornada, 31 de octubre de 2014)

No sólo es en Ayotzinapa, Tlatlaya y Puebla, es en todo el país, advierte la CIDH (Sin Embargo, 30 de octubre de 2014)

Abuchean a delegación mexicana en la CIDH por caso Iguala: “Regrésalos EPN” (Sin Embargo, 30 de octubre de 2014)

Posicionamiento de organizaciones de la sociedad civil sobre las graves violaciones de derechos humanos y la falta de respuestas del Estado mexicano (OSC, 30 de octubre de 2014)

Informe completo “Derechos Humanos y Protesta Social en México” (Frente por la libertad de expresión y la protesta social, octubre de 2014)

Para más información de SIPAZ:

Nacional: piden ONG a visita oficial de la CIDH a México ante la “crisis en derechos humanos” (14 de agosto de 2014)


Guerrero: 40 years since the forced disappearance of Rosendo Radilla Pacheco

September 2, 2014

imagesOn 25 August 1974, Rosendo Radilla Pacheco was illegally arrested at a military checkpoint. He was last seen alive in the Military Barracks of Atoyac de Álvarez, Guerrero. Rosendo Radilla was a celebrated social activist from the Atoyac municipality who worked for the health and education of his people and acted as mayor.

For the executive secretary of the Association of Relatives of the Detained, Disappeared, and Victims of Human-Rights Violations in Mexico (AFADEM), Julio Mata Montiel, the lack of political will from the federal government, “be from whichever [party] it may be,” is the principal cause for the continued impunity in the case. He assured that “on 25 August will have passed 40 years since the forced disappearance of Rosendo Radilla, one of 470 disappearances in Atoyac which took place during this time, despite the recommendations from the Inter-American Commission on Human Rights (IACHR) and a sentence that was handed down five years ago by the Inter-American Court on Human Rights (IACHR) against the Mexican State. However, the State still refuses to reveal the whereabouts of Rosendo Radilla, such that the Mexican government is not concerned by international condemnation.”

It should be mentioned in these terms that on 22 August ended the excavations which the Guerrero Truth Commission (Comverdad) carried out for three days in Atoyac in an attempt to seek out possible clandestine burial sites associated with the 49th Infantry Batallion. Nicomedes Fuentes García, Comverdad member, reported that they had found bones which will be analyzed to determine their origins. Tita Radilla Martínez, daughter to Rosendo Radilla, has insisted that it is necessary that this labor be carried out by specialized experts. She announced that no public act would be taken to commemorate the anniversary of her father’s disappearance.

For more information (in Spanish):

Más elementos sobre el caso Rosendo Radilla Pacheco (CMDPDH)

Al reanudar excavaciones, la Comverdad encuentra osamenta en Atoyac (La Jornada de Guerrero, 21 de agosto de 2014)

Sugieren familiares a la Comverdad parar las excavaciones hasta que lleguen especialistas (La Jornada de Guerrero, 23 de agosto de 2014)

Concluye la Comverdad las excavaciones en Atoyac; esperan que se reanuden con peritos (El Sur de Acapulco, 24 de agosto de 2014)

No le importa al gobierno aclarar crímenes: Afadem (La Jornada de Guerrero, 24 de agosto de 2014)

For more information from SIPAZ (in English):

Guerrero: Mexican State is denounced for failing to observe its obligations in the Rosendo Radilla Pacheco case (2 June 2014)

Guerrero: Homage to Rosendo Radilla Pacheco, disappeared by the Army (15 March 2014)

Guerrero: Soldiers harass Tita Radilla in Atoyac (7 December 2013)

Guerrero/National: SCJN affirms observance of IACHR sentences in Radilla and Cantú cases (28 September 2012)


National: NGOs ask to the Inter-American Commission on Human Rights (IACHR) an official visit to Mexico in the face of the “human rights crisis” in the country

August 30, 2014

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During the 152 Special Session of the Inter-American Commission on Human Rights (IACHR) held in Mexico City from 12 to 14 August, 55 networks and civil society organizations called on the mechanism of the Organization of American States (OAS) to realize an official visit to Mexicoin the face of the deterioration of the effective exercise of human rights” in the country. In a joint statement, the organizations argued that “the presence of the Inter-American Commission is an occasion to highlight the huge gap between what is stated in the American Convention on Human Rights and the reality of our country, that ranks first regarding individual petitions and requests for precautionary measures before the IACHR”. They announced that they would deliver information about the “human rights crisis that we currently face in the country”, which particularly affects women, children, indigenous peoples and human rights defenders.

“Given the deterioration in the observance of human rights that Mexico has experienced in recent years, the need for the Inter-American System to closely monitor the situation in the country is imperative”, they stressed.

For more information (in Spanish):

Comunicado conjunto: Ante grave situación de derechos humanos, sociedad civil llama a la Comisión Interamericana a realizar una visita oficial al país (ONG, 11 de agosto de 2014)

Piden ONG a CIDH supervisar a México por “crisis en derechos humanos” (Proceso, 11 de agosto de 2014)

Inicia sesión de CIDH en México; activistas quieren visita oficial (CIMAC Noticias, 11 de agosto de 2014)

Piden ONG la presencia en México de representantes de la CIDH (La Jornada, 12 de agosto de 2014)

For more information from SIPAZ (in English):

National/International: Mexico confronts a “humanitarian crisis” amidst context of violence and impunity, denounces civil society in Brussels (March 30, 2014)


Chiapas: 18 years since the disappearance of Minerva Pérez, her case remains unpunished

June 25, 2014
Aniversario luctuoso en Mashojá Chucjá 2011 @ SIPAZ

Anniversary of her death, Mashojá Shucjá, 2011 @ SIPAZ

 June 20 is the 18th anniversary of the forced disappearance of Minerva Guadalupe Pérez Torres, an indigenous Ch’ol and native of the community of Masojá Shucjá, in the municipality of Tila, who in 1996, at the age of only 19, “was disappeared by members of the then paramilitary group Development Peace and Justice,” as it says in the bulletin of the Fray Bartolome de Las Casas Human Rights Centre (CDHFBC). In addition, the CDHFBC has evidence of persistent “impunity for the gross and systematic violations of the human rights to truth and justice in five unresolved cases of forced disappearance of women, victims of internal armed conflict in Chiapas.”

It should be noted that Minerva was tortured and gang-raped for three days; even today her whereabouts are unknown, according to testimony gathered by the CDHFBLC. The Inter-American Commission on Human Rights (IACHR) is currently studying the cases of the disappearance of 37 persons, 85 executions, and forcible displacement of more than 12 thousand people in the lower area of ​​Tila during the years of armed conflict.

For more Information (in Spanish):

18 años de exigencia de justicia, 18 años de impunidad. 18 años de no cansarse de buscar a Minerva hasta encontrarla (CDHFBLC, June 20, 2014)

For more information from SIPAZ (in English):

Chiapas: 17 years after the forced disappearance of Minerva Guadalupe Pérez Torres, her case is taken up at the IACHR (25 June 2013)

Chiapas: 16 years of impunity in the case of the forced disappearance of Minerva Guadalupe Pérez Torres (25 June 2012)

Chiapas: Masojá Shucjá, commemoration of the victims of the victims of the conflict of ’95 and ’96 (7 October 2011)

 

 

 


Guerrero: Mexican State is denounced for failing to observe its obligations in the Rosendo Radilla Pacheco case

June 2, 2014

rosendo radilla

Nearly 40 years since the forced disappearance of Rosendo Radilla Pacheco and 5 years since the Inter-American Court on Human Rights (IACHR) handed down its sentence in the case, the Mexican Commission for the Defense and Promotion of Human Rights (CMDPDH) and the Association of Relatives of the Detained, Disappeared, and Victims of Human-Rights Violations in Mexico (AFADEM) denounced that the federal government has failed to observe its obligation of providing the whereabouts of the disappeared and that it continues not to investigate those responsible for the disappearance: “the investigation has not been conducted with due diligence, such that it has not succeeded in identifying the responsible of the disappearance, much less process them.  It is also true that the Federal Attorney General’s Office (PGR) has similarly failed with its duty to provide the relatives of Mr. Radilla with a copy of the investigation in a form that would respect the rights of victims, as the IACHR has ordered.  Due to both omissions, the rights of Rosendo Radilla’s relatives have been repeatedly violated, as have those of society to know the truth of the acts, context, and circumstances in which the crime was committed.”

Last April, CMDPDH and AFADEM presented observations for the eleventh report of the federal government regarding the observance of the sentence in the case, noting that the federal congress “similarly has failed to modify the Federal Penal Code to adequately classify this type of crime of forced disappearance of persons.”

Rosendo Radilla Pacheco, a social activist from the municipality of Atoyac de Álvarez, Guerrero, was disappeared by Army units in 1974.  In 2009, the IACHR released a sentence in the case condemning the Mexican State for grave human-rights violations.

For more information (in Spanish):

Impunidad y negación: respuestas del Estado mexicano sobre Caso Radilla (CMDPDH, 23 de abril de 2014)

Exige Afadem pesquisa seria sobre los desaparecidos de la guerra sucia(La Jornada de Guerrero, 14 de mayo de 2014)

Caso Rosendo Radilla Pacheco (Comisión Mexicana de Defensa y Promoción de los Derechos Humanos)

For more information from SIPAZ (in English):

Guerrero: Homage to Rosendo Radilla Pacheco, disappeared by the Army (15 March 2014)

Guerrero: Soldiers harass Tita Radilla in Atoyac (7 December 2013)

Guerrero/National: SCJN affirms observance of IACHR sentences in Radilla and Cantú cases (28 September 2012)

Guerrero briefs: The PGR should report on the Radilla case (13 December 2011)

Guerrero – briefs: government announces installation of Commission of Truth and Tita Radilla receives recognition (28 November 2011)

Guerrero – briefs: State accepts responsibility in Radilla case in absence of relatives (27 November 2011)


Guerrero/Mexico/Latin America: Grave challenges to Goldcorp and other Canadian mining firms

May 3, 2014

Imagen @ M4

Image @ M4

The Mesoamerican Movement against the Mining Extractive Model (M4) has published a communique entitled “GOLDCORP SICKENS ME!” in which it demands “that the Canadian firm GoldCorp Inc. engage in a corporate audit for the damages to health and environment that its mines provoke in our territories as well as on our governmental and non-governmental authorities,” given that on 1 May the Goldcorp stockholders will hold their annual meeting.

With reference to said Canadian firm, M4 indicated that “in terms of human rights as well as the environment, health, labor, and agriculture: it illegally appropriates lands and rejects the judicial resolutions against it; it observes agreements it has made with communities only in the breach; it violates collective rights when it perniciously evades and avoids free, prior, and informed consent.”  And with regard to the mining project of Carrizalillo, Guerrero, M4 specified that “much more incomprehensible still is the reality that in 7 of its mines, the company displays a certificate of its compliance with the ‘International Code on the Management of Cyanide’ even when it breaks leaching pools, as has happen in Carrizalillo, Mexico, where two people have died due to toxicity from exposure to this dangerous element.”

With regard to the project in Carrizalillo, for his part, the CEO of Goldcorp sent a document to the Secretary for Economic Development assuring the latter that “to date there exist no social agreements that have not been observed,” even while he minimized the reports of ejidatarios regarding impacts on health.  He attempted to “delegitimize” the demand of the ejidatarios, who request an increase in the rent for their lands paid by the Canadian firm, the very reason for which on 1 April they began a blockade on the access roads to the mine, thus disabling its operations to date.

It should be noted that the Work Group on Mining and Human Rights in Latin America presented a report from the Inter-American Commission on Human Rights which affirms that between 50 and 70% of mining activity in Latin America is carried out by Canadian firms and that mineral extraction is the industrial sector which provokes the most denunciations and complaints regarding human-rights violations.  Mexico is the American country in which Canadian companies have most activity ($20 billion), and the Work Group further observes that, as a consequence of this model, in the cases in question grave environmental, social, economic, and cultural impacts have been denounced, in addition to violations to several rights, including the right to life, physical integrity, and property for the communities which neighbor these respective mining projects.

For more information (in Spanish):

Acción de denuncia: GoldCorp no merece premios, exigimos justicia(Movimiento M4, 28 de abril de 2014)

Pide la minera Gold Corp al gobierno que intervenga en el conflicto de Carrizalillo (Red Mexicana de Afectados por la Minería – REMA, 26 de abril de 2014)

Daños a la salud por minería a cielo abierto de la canadiense GoldCorp(Red Mexicana de Afectados por la Minería – REMA, 27 de abril de 2014)

El impacto de la minería canadiense en América Latina (El Ciudadano, 27 de abril de 2014)

Informe presentado a la Comisión Interamericana de Derechos HumanosEl impacto de la minería canadiense en América Latina y la responsabilidad de Canadá (Grupo de Trabajo sobre Minería y Derechos Humanos en América Latina)

For more information from SIPAZ (in English):

Guerrero: Ejidatarios from Carrizalillo to sue mining company before the Agrarian Tribunal (29 April 2014)

Guerrero: ejidatarios of Los Filos close gold mine in Carrizalillo (10 April 2014)

In Focus: The unsustainability of the Extractive Mineral Model (May 2013)

Mexico: “Mined land, the defense of the rights of communities and of the environment” (14 December 2011)


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