Chiapas: Ejidatarios from Tila receive threats following march to commemorate 80th anniversary of the ejido

October 26, 2014

© SIPAZ

© SIPAZ

The Miguel Agustín Pro Juárez Center for Human Rights (PRODH Center) has reported on a denunciation of the recent acts of harassment targeting ejidatari@s of Tila which “could affect the personal integrity and [...] collectively affect the ejidal autonomy of the Ch’ol indigenous people.”

On 16 October,1500 ejidatarios from Tila (northern zone of Chiapas) marched to commemorate the creation of their ejido 80 years ago.  During the march, “the commander of the municipal police filmed protestors from the balcony of the police office,” noted the PRODH Center.  PRODH also indicated that “a day later, an ejidataria was assaulted by unknown persons, though witnesses could observe that one of the assailants was wearing a municipal police uniform.”

PRODH has manifested its concern for the harassment against the ejidal authorities of Tila, given that the ejidal commissioner has been followed and surveilled in the wake of the mobilization.  PRODH noted as well that “unknown persons have surrounded his home and asked local residents if that is where the ejidal president lives; as a consequence, indigenous ejidal authorities have found themselves displaced, amidst the threat of suffering new attacks.”

For this reason, PRODH has demanded the cessation of all harassment and attacks on members of the Tila ejido; that the necessary, sufficient, and effective measures be implemented to guarantee the security and physical and psychological integrity of the members of the ejidal commission of Tila; and that those responsible for these threats and acts of harassment be investigated and punished forthright.

It is critical to note that in 2008, the Tila ejido won a motion it has advanced against one of the several attempts at plundering its lands it has suffered since 1964 due to the actions of Tila City Hall, the Chiapas state government, and the local congress.  This motion ordered the restitution of 130 hectares of ancestral lands; however, using the false argument that said sentence would be impossible to observe, City Hall has failed to observe it.  This is the reason the Tila ejidatari@s have advanced the case of the violation of sentence 1302/20130 before the Supreme Court for Justice in the Nation (SCJN).

For more information (in Spanish):

Centro Prodh denuncia nuevos ataques contra ejido Tila en Chiapas, Centro Prodh, 20 de octubre de 2014

Denuncian hostigamiento a ejidatarios y ejidatarias del ejido Tila, Chiapas Paralelo, 21 de octubre de 2014

Marcha mitín por 80 aniversario de nuestro ejido, laotraejidotila, 17 de octubre de 2014

For more information from SIPAZ (in English):

Chiapas: Ejidatarios from Tila denounce new attempt to loot land (January 22, 2014)

Chiapas: Supreme Court postpones new decision on Tila ejido (8 April 2013)

Chiapas: March and rally in Tila to commemorate the founding of the Tila ejido 79 years ago (20 August 2013)

Chiapas: Supreme Court postpones new decision on Tila ejido (8 April 2013)

Chiapas: Supreme Court postpones decision on case of the Tila ejidatario(16 August 2012)

Chiapas: Ejidatarios march in Tila and Mexico City (16 August 2012)


Chiapas: SCJN calls on Chiapas state congress to modify electoral reforms to respect gender equity

October 11, 2014

Congreso de Chiapas (@Chiapas Paralelo)

On 2 October, the Supreme Court for Justice in the Nation (SCJN) released a sentence regarding electoral reform in Chiapas state that requested that the local deputies of the congress eliminate a clause so as to respect gender equity among candidates.  Last June, the Chiapas state congress approved a reform that included an exception to gender equity in the case that a candidate would leave an electoral campaign through a democratic way as determined internally to the party in question.  The Party for Democratic Revolution (PRD) had submitted a motion regarding the constitutionality of this clause, considering it to function to the detriment of women’s political participation.

Beyond this, and for the first time, the SCJN declared that the electoral laws that mandate affirmative action for women are constitutional.  Another article of the electoral code of Chiapas that calls for women to lead the lists of candidates to multiple positions and for the wages for candidates to be represented proportionately had been challenged by the Labor Party (PT), though the Court has decided against this challenge now.

For more information (in Spanish):

Obliga la SCJN al Congreso de Chiapas a respetar paridad de género en candidaturas (Chiapas Paralelo, 4 de octubre de 2014)

SCJN invalida reformas electorales de Chiapas (Chiapas Paralelo, 3 de octubre de 2014)

Avala Suprema Corte trato preferente no igualitario a mujeres candidatas (Noticias.net, 3 de octubre de 2014)


Chiapas: New communique from Las Abejas, five years after the release of those responsible for the Acteal massacre

September 2, 2014

Sociedad Civil Las Abejas (@acteal.blogspot.com)Las Abejas Civil Society (@acteal.blogspot.com)

On 22 August, at the Fray Bartolomé de Las Casas Center for Human Rights (CDHFBC), the Las Abejas Civil Society published a new communiqué to commemorate the five years since the beginning of the release of the formerly imprisoned persons who had been considered responsible for the Acteal massacre of December 1997. Since August 2009, the Supreme Court for Justice in the Nation (SCJN) has allowed 54 of the 70 who were sentenced to be released in this sense. Some of those who have been released were allowed to go freely without warning the public about this, as in the case of Roberto Méndez Gutiérrez, a “paramilitary commander and confessed patricipant in the Acteal massacre.” Amidst this tendency, members of Los Abejas declared that “our memory tells us that this Supreme Court has been converted for us into the ‘Supreme Court for the rich and criminals of the Nation'; this court is the expression of the justice system in Mexico, which is rotten.”

The Acteal massacre and the impunity that prevails in the case to date, stressed Las Abejas, form part of the low-intensity warfare being promoted in the region by the “bad government.” Las Abejas indicated furthermore that the repression, murders, and massacres are a consequence fo the “commercial traties” which Mexico has signed with rich countries, toward the end of “exterminating the Zapatista people and other organized peoples,” given that “if the indigenous peoples had control of their land, NAFTA would not be able to function in Mexico, the U.S., or Canada, for this way they could not extract and steal all the wealth possessed by our Mother Earth.”

In light of this “death culture,” Las Abejas declare that “We are aware that justice will not come from above,” and for this reason “our search for justice for the Acteal massacre we call the construction of ‘Another Justice,’ one that is conceptualized and constructed from the organized peoples, women and men of Mexico who also seek a dignified and true justice, as we do. This other justice, this dignified and true justice, is now being built in the Peoples’ Permanent Tribunal (TPP), in meetings and fora of organized peoples and communities in Mexico […]. We in the Las Abejas Civil Society will not resign ourselves but will instead continue building our ties with brothers and sisters who struggle each and every day against this oppressive capitalist system.”

For more information (in Spanish):

A 5 años de la excarcelación de los paramilitares (Las Abejas de Acteal, 22 de agosto de 2014)

Libres, 54 paramilitares sentenciados por la masacre de Acteal: Las Abejas (La Jornada, 23 de agosto de 2014)

La “Suprema Corte de ricos y criminales de la Nación” ha liberado a 54 paramilitares sentenciados por la masacre de Acteal: Las Abejas (La Jornada de Oriente, 24 de agosto de 2014)

For more information from SIPAZ (in English):

Chiapas: Las Abejas Civil Society against the “Proposed Hydrocarbon Law” (28 June 2014)

Chiapas: Las Abejas Civil Society challenges Mexican justice system and continues demanding justice (May 2, 2014)


Guerrero: Indigenous community requests that the SCJN review the Mining Law

July 14, 2014

Conferencia de prensa en el Centro Prodh Foto (@Alina Vallejo, Sididh)

Press conference at the Prodh Center
Photo (@Alina Vallejo, Sididh)

On 29 June in Mexico City, representatives of the Me’phaa indigenous community of San Miguel del Progreso-Júba Wajiín (Malinaltepec municipality), organized a press conference together with the Tlachinollan Mountain Center for Human Rights at which they requested that the Supreme Court for Justice in the Nation (SCJN) “analyze for the first time if the Mining Law which exists is compatible with the Constitution and international human-rights treaties.”  It is important to recall that on 12 February 2014, the community was granted a court case against two mining concessions that had been awarded to transnational firms without any sort of prior informed consent within at least 84% of the affected territory.  The victory represented a historical moment for the rights of indigenous peoples.

At the conference, the San Miguel del Progreso-Júba Wajiín community recalled that on 13 March 2014, the Economy Minister presented the Resource for Review through which the federal government has tried to overturn said sentence by appealing to the existing mining law to claim that the human rights of the community have in no case been violated, given that the legislation does not demand free prior and informed consent in the case of mining concessions.

Lastly, the representatives of the Me’phaa community stressed the need for and importance of reviewing the Mining Law, not only for their own community, but also for all the communities that have been affected by the awarding of mining concessions on their lands.  In this way, they indicated that it could provide the Supreme Court another chance to limit the looting of land by clearly establishing the rights of peoples and of indigenous communities.

For more information (in Spanish):

Comunidad me’phaa llama a SCJN a revisar Ley Minera (Sididh, 30 de junio de 2014)

Obtiene comunidad indígena Me’phaa amparo inédito contra concesión minera (NAR, 29 de junio de 2014)

Indígenas Me’phaa de Guerrero ganan histórico amparo contra mineras(Entresemana, 2 de julio de 2014)

For more information from SIPAZ (in English):

Guerrero/Mexico/Latin America: Grave challenges to Goldcorp and other Canadian mining firms (May 3, 2014)

Guerrero: Ejidatarios from Carrizalillo to sue mining company before the Agrarian Tribunal (29 April 2014)

Guerrero: ejidatarios of Los Filos close gold mine in Carrizalillo (10 April 2014)

In Focus: The unsustainability of the Extractive Mineral Model (May 2013)

Mexico: “Mined land, the defense of the rights of communities and of the environment” (14 December 2011)


Nationa: UN Special Rapporteur on torture ends official visit to Mexico

May 16, 2014


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Upon completing his visit of 12 days to the country, Juan E. Méndez, UN Special Rapporteur on torture and other cruel, inhuman, and degrading punishments, affirmed that torture is a “generalized phenomenon” in Mexico.  He recognized that the statistics on the prevalence of torture are on the decline, but he doubted that this in fact means that torture as practiced has similarly declined.  He located impunity and the regular use of torture as a “means of criminal investigation” as great problems in this sense.

In a press conference held on 2 May, Méndez presented the preliminary conclusions of his visit, stressing the numerous denunciations he received.  He also recognized progress on the question, for example on the use of military tribunals and a handful of the sentences handed down by the Supreme Court for Justice in the Nation (SCJN).  He expressed his worry for the continued militarization of various regions of the country, in addition to the persistent participation of military commanders in civilian security forces.

As part of his preliminary recommendations, Méndez proposed a decrease in the resort to the use of “community control,” comprehensive reparations by those affected by torture, expeditious investigations into presumed human-rights violations, the standardization of torture at the national level with international standards, and the regulation of the use of legitimate public force.

For more information (in Spanish):

La tortura está “generalizada” en México: ONU (entrevista CNN México, 2 de mayo de 2014)

Generalizada en México, la tortura como medio de investigación: relator de la ONU (La Jornada, 3 de mayo de 2014)

Para erradicar la tortura hay que suprimir la idea de que es normal: relator de la ONU (La Jornada, 4 de mayo de 2014)

Comunicado de organizaciones chiapanecas por visita del Relator Especial sobre la Tortura de la ONU (2 de mayo de 2014)

Presentarán a relator de la ONU 18 casos de tortura en Chiapas(Proceso, 28 de abril de 2014)

Informe sobre Tortura en Guerrero (Centro de Derechos Humanos de la Montaña Tlachinollan)

Tortura, “práctica terriblemente cotidiana en México”, acusan ONG ante relator de la ONU (Proceso, 22 de abril de 2014)

For more information from SIPAZ (in English):

National: Special rapporteur on torture begins visit to Mexico (29 April 2014)

National: International organizations conclude observation mission on torture in Mexico (10 June 2013)

Mexico: UN Committee against Torture expresses grave concern for the practice of torture in Mexico (9 November 2012)

National: Amnesty International presents report regarding use of torture in Mexico (19 October 2012)


Chiapas/Oaxaca: Aggressions continue in the Chimalapas conflict

March 1, 2014

 

Imagen @ Página 3

The website of Noticias Net has published a note saying that the Chiapas cattle rancher Jorge Humberto Luna Salinas (Tito Luna) invaded the territory of San Miguel Chimalapas in mid-February to destroy the installations of a camp exploiting pine sap, beyond setting fire to 2500 receptacles, according to a denunciation made by communards from the congregation of San Antonio, Chimalapa. They stressed that the fire spread from the exploitation camp to the rest of hte forest of La Hondonada and still remains live.

It should be recalled that the Oaxaca state government in January published a map of Los Chimalapas recognizing Chiapas as the owner of 50% of the communal lands under dispute before the Supreme Court for Justice in the Nation (SCJN).

For more information (in Spanish):

Destruye e incendia Tito Luna campo de resina de Chimalapa (Noticias Net, 17 de febrero de 2014)

Comuneros de Chimalapa denuncian otra presunta invasión de Chiapas (Quadratín, 21 de enero de 2014)

Da Oaxaca 80 mil hectáreas de Chimalapas a Chiapas “en papel” (Página 3, 25 de enero de 2014)

Oaxaca publica controvertida cartografia de Chimalapas (Chiapas Paralelo, 11 de enero de 2014)

For more information from SIPAZ (in English):

Oaxaca/Chiapas: meeting among governors in Governance regarding Chimalapas case (18 May 2012)

Oaxaca/Chiapas: Possible “electoral fraud” is denounced in the Chimalapas region (3 April 2012)

Oaxaca/Chiapas: Update in the Chimalapas case (6 March 2012)

Oaxaca/Chiapas: Zoques present case before the SCJN regarding Chimalapas; Army installs base in zone of conflict (8 February 2012)

 


Mexico: Human-rights organizations call on Senate to reform military justice system

October 5, 2013

Audiencias públicas sobre justicia militar en el Senado (@PAN)Within the context of the public audiences regarding military courts carried out between 24 and 27 September 2013 in the Senate of the Republic, national human-rights organizations called on the present legislature to pass reforms as soon as possible to restrict the use of military tribunals in accordance with international standards.  By means of a communique, these organizations indicated that said reform should observe the four sentences emitted by the Inter-American Court on Human Rights (IACHR) and the recommendations made by different international human-rights mechanisms affiliated with the United Nations, as well as those advanced by the Supreme Court for Justice in the Nation (SCJN).

Amnesty International (AI) publicly expressed its support for the Mexican organizations, claiming that “due to its lack of impartiality and independence, military justice has proven to be an obstacle in the struggle to put an end to the impunity of human-rights violations committed by armed forces.”

With regard to the public audiences, Javier Hernández Valencia, representative of the UN High Commissioner’s Office for Human Rights, stressed that “the military courts should be limited, that is, the human rights violations committed by soldiers should be judged in civilian tribunals.”  Valencia questioned the senators why it is that “there has been excluded the term human rights or persons within the proposed reform, for it is important that this definition be included in the changes that you will carry out.”

For more information (in Spanish):

Pronunciamiento de organizaciones civiles: Reformas al Código de Justicia Militar deben ser conformes con las obligaciones de México: organizaciones de derechos humanos (27 de septiembre de 2013)

Pide AI a Senado reformar justicia militar (El Universal, 27 de septiembre de 2013)

Emplazan al Senado a reformar justicia militar (Proceso, 27 de septiembre de 2013)

El fuero militar debe ser acotado ante violaciones a civiles: ONU (La Jornada, 25 de septiembre de 2013)

For more information from SIPAZ (in English):

Mexico: Civil society calls on SCJN to consolidate restriction of military tribunals (28 September 2012)

Guerrero: SCJN orders that the Bonfilio Rubio case be tried in civil court (27 August 2012)

National: NGOs request that SCJN resolve affairs relating to military tribunals in 32 cases (17 June 2012)


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