National/Guerrero: Unfavorable reports about corruption and human rights in Mexico

CNDH

Luis Raúl González Pérez, CNDH president. Photo: @CuartOscuro

Two reports on human rights in Mexico coincided in that there is little progress in the areas of human rights and combatting corruption. In one report, the president of the National Commission for Human Rights (Comisión Nacional de Derechos Humanos – CNDH), Luis Raul Gonzalez Perez, declared that Guerrero is the state with most complaints, followed by Coahuila, Tamaulipas, and Veracruz. According to Aristegui Noticias news outlet, forced disappearances have risen to 26 thousand since the beginning of the “war against drugs” in 2006 to the present. During the presentation of the Commission’s (CNDH) annual report to the Permanent Commission of the General Congress, Gonzalez Perez highlighted that “the problem of disappearances challenges and questions the abilities and resources of the Mexican State to respond to a situation that, we the passage of time, we have not been able to overcome.” Likewise, he added that “the Chalchihuapan, Tlatlaya, Iguala, and Apatzingán cases had altered the general and historical perception of human rights in our country, testing its institutions.” As regards the violation of human rights, Chiapas is the sixth state with the highest frequency of reports, and Oaxaca eighth.

In another report, Human Rights Watch (HRW) noted in its 2015 annual report that “members of the Mexican security forces have participated in numerous forced disappearances. […] Since 2006, the CNDH received approximately 9,000 complaints of abuses committed by members of the army – including 1,700 during the [term of office] of the current government.” The same organization highlighted that the executive has made little progress in sanctioning members of the military implicated in cases of human rights violations as they are under the jurisdiction of military courts. Added to this, Alejandro Salas, director of Americas of International Transparency (Americas de Transparencia Internacional), noted that ‘in countries like Mexico where the police are at the service of local ‘caciques’, or at the service of mayors, of provincial governors, the police is not doing its professional and independent work, but instead responding to the interests of certain groups, often illegal groups, such as drug traffickers.”

For more information in Spanish:

Guerrero, Tamaulipas y Veracruz, los estados con más denuncias por desapariciones: CNDH (Eme Equis, 27 de enero de 2016)

Ni combate a la corrupción, ni avances en DDHH, coinciden dos reportes globales sobre México (Sin Embargo, 27 de enero de 2016)

Autoridades, incapaces de responder a casos de desaparición forzada: CNDH, en su informe 2015 (Animal Político, 27 de enero de 2016)

Escasos avances para castigar a militares violadores de derechos humanos en México: Human Rights Watch (Sididh, 28 de enero de 2016)

Impunidad enmarca desapariciones en México, denuncia Cadhac ante la ONU (Proceso, 27 de enero de 2016)

Informe anual de actividades 2015 (Comisión Nacional de los Derechos Humanos)

For more information from SIPAZ:

Guerrero: Padres y madres de Ayotzinapa van a la Corte, a 16 meses de la desaparición de sus hijos (27 de enero de 2016)

Guerrero: ONG y expertos en derechos humanos respaldan labor del GIEI en caso Ayotzinapa (25 de enero de 2016)

Guererro: Se cumplen 4 años de desaparición forzada de campesinos ecologistas de la Costa Grande (8 de diciembre de 2015)

Nacional/Internacional: Ejército y fuerzas de seguridad involucradas en asesinatos extrajudiciales, tortura, desaparición forzada: EU (10 de julio de 2015)

 

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