Guerrero: Intimidation of El Sur Reporter Zacarias Cervantes Reported

November 30, 2017

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El Sur reporter, Zacarias Cervantes, reported that before 8 pm on November 15th he was stopped by about seven men, including at least one armed man, who bent his arm and forced him to duck his head for about 20 minutes while they were checking his car in downtown Chilpancingo. He said that they took his cell phone without threatening him or giving him any warning. He also said that the attackers left a copy of El Surs previous day’s edition on the passenger seat open on the page where a reporter’s note was published in which he pointed out the lack of progress in the investigations one month after the murder of the founder of the Indigenous Vicente Guerrero Peasant Organization, Ranferi Hernandez Acevedo. While he was held, he could hear that one of the attackers was making a phone call and asking “Do we take him?”.

The Association of Journalists of the State of Guerrero (APEG in its Spanish acronym) described the event as “an act of premeditated intimidation, planned from the [positions of] power to silence him”, and demanded a halt to the aggressions against the union and respect for freedom of expression. They asked the state government to investigate the assault, although they are aware “of what little it will do to resolve it, as has happened with other cases, such as the murders of comrades Francisco Beltran and Cecilio Pineda, which occurred during these two years of the administration.”

The organization defending freedom of expression Article 19 issued an alert after what happened and requested “in accordance with the gravity of the attempted disappearance the implementation of measures aimed at protecting their life, liberty, integrity and security.”

For its part, the Directorate of Social Communication of the State Government said it has a firm commitment to freedom of expression and respect for human rights and invited to formally denounce the event before the corresponding instances.

For more information in Spanish:

Denuncia intimidación el reportero Zacarías Cervantes (El Sur, 16 de noviembre de 2017)

Agreden a reportero del diario ‘El Sur’ en Guerrero (La Jornada, 16 de noviembre de 2017)

Sujetos armados agreden físicamente e intimidan a periodista de El Sur en Guerrero (Artículo 19, 16 de noviembre de 2017)

Intimidan hombres armados y retienen por 20 minutos al reportero de El Sur Zacarías Cervantes (El Sur, 17 de noviembre de 2017)

For more information from SIPAZ:

Guerrero: agresiones contra el corresponsal de Proceso (14 de junio de 2017)

Guerrero : Atacan a balazos a comunicadora originaria de Xochistlahuaca en Ometepec (5 de junio de 2017)

Nacional/Guerrero: Siguen ataques y homicidios de periodistas y defensores de Derechos Humanos (19 de mayo de 2017)

Guerrero : asesinan al periodista Cecilio Pineda (6 de marzo de 2017

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National/International: Visit of the United Nations Special Rapporteur on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples to Mexico Ends

November 23, 2017

UNPhoto: @frayba

From November 5th to 17th, the United Nations Special Rapporteur on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples, Victoria Tauli-Corpuz, indigenous leader of the Philippines, made an official visit to Mexico, which included the capitals of the states of Guerrero, Chiapas and Chihuahua. She met with more than 200 representatives of 23 indigenous peoples, civil organizations defending their rights and officials at all levels.

At the end of his visit, she declared that “the current inadequate legal recognition of indigenous peoples as holders of rights, together with structural discrimination, are at the basis of all the issues and concerns” in the areas “lands and territories; autonomy, self-determination and political participation; self-ascription of indigenous peoples; access to justice; violence and impunity; the right to determine their development priorities; consultation and free, prior and informed consent; economic, social and cultural rights, and the particular situation of specific sectors of indigenous peoples.” While acknowledging “Mexico’s support for advancing the indigenous agenda in international forums,” “this commitment must be coherent and should be reflected in the application of these standards in Mexico.”

On the controversial issue of the consultation, she said that “even in the absence of national legislation on this issue, Mexico already has the obligation to consult indigenous peoples on any activity or legislative or administrative measures that could affect them according to the standards of the ILO Convention 169, the Inter-American jurisprudence and the UN Declaration. The adoption of specific legislation is not the only mechanism to apply the right to consultation and the fact that there is no single model for consultation should also be taken into account, since each indigenous people has its own authorities and decision-making processes.”

The rapporteur also stressed that “the initiatives of indigenous peoples in the area of ​​autonomy and self-government should enjoy greater recognition, and be recognized and incorporated into the overall political structure of the country. In addition to self-government, indigenous peoples have the right to participate fully, if they so wish, in the political life of the country. I have seen some positive developments that could facilitate the political participation of indigenous peoples in this area, such as the possibility of registering independent candidacies.”

For more information in Spanish:

Relatora de la ONU constata violaciones a derechos de indígenas en Chiapas (Proceso, 15 de noviembre de 2017)

Declaración de cierre de Misión a México (Victoria Tauli-Corpuz, ONU, 17 de noviembre de 2017)

Discriminación indígena persiste por falta de voluntad política: ONU (La Jornada, 17 de noviembre de 2017)

Indígenas no son consultados sobre megaproyectos que afectan su territorio en México: ONU (Aristegui Noticias, 17 de noviembre de 2017)

Relatora Especial sobre Derechos de los Pueblos Indígenas de la ONU visita Guerrero (Boletín de prensa, Tlachinollan, Guerrero, 14 de noviembre de 2017)

Pueblos indígenas presentan recomendaciones ante ONU (Boletín de prensa, Chiapas,15 de noviembre de 2017)

For more information from SIPAZ:

Nacional – México: Visita de la Relatora especial de la ONU sobre derechos de los pueblos indígenas (8 de noviembre de 2017)


Guerrero: False Accusations of Kidnapping against Community Police

November 15, 2017

CP.pngPhoto@SIPAZ

The Tlachinollan Mountain Human Rights Center denounced another false accusation of kidnapping against community officers of the Regional Coordinator of Community Authorities – Community Police (CRAC – PC in its Spanish acronym). In a bulletin they explained that in the course of a confrontation on November 7th in the Criminal Court of First Instance in Tlapa, Guerrero, three alleged kidnap victims from the community of Santa Cruz, municipality of Huamuxtitlan and one from Tlatlauquitepec, admitted to have not been kidnapped and or deprived of their freedom by community police.

“This is another element that demonstrates the innocence of the community police and that should lead to their complete freedom, because they did not commit any crime, and in any case they only applied and adhered to their normative systems”, said Rogelio Teliz, lawyer of the the Tlachinollan Mountain Human Rights Center, at the end of the confrontation.

Tlachinollan accused the Guerrero state justice system of criminalizing “the community justice system, falsely accusing them of kidnapping when what they exercise what is their right to self-determination and to build their own systems of security and justice under their uses and customs.”

It should be remembered that during its XXII anniversary in October, the CRAC – PC, had already denounced the criminalization and denial of their rights and of Law 701 of Recognition, Rights and Culture of the Indigenous Peoples and Communities of the State of Guerrero.

For more information in Spanish:

Presuntos agraviados, advierten en careo, no reconocer a policías comunitarios acusados falsamente de secuestro(Centro de derechos humanos de la montaña Tlachinollan, 9 de noviembre de 2017)

Advierteron que quienes de desempeñanan entonces como policia comunitario, no son quienes los secuetraron (Bajo palabra , 9 de noviembre de 2017)

Protestan en Cereso para exigir libertad de dirigente de la policía comunitaria de Tixtla (La Jornada en línea, 6 de noviembre de 2017)

Crac-Pc, 22 años (La Jornada Guerrero, 27 de octubre de 2017)

For more information from SIPAZ:

Guerrero: se celebra el XXII Aniversario de la Coordinadora Regional de Autoridades Comunitarias-Policía Comunitaria (CRAC-PC) ( 18 de octubre de 2017)

Guerrero : Testigos de cargo del caso de Arturo Campos Herrera reconocen que no cometió el delito de secuestro por lo cual se encuentra preso (9 de diciembre de 2016)
Guerrero : exigen liberación de Arturo Campos Herrera, integrante de la CRAC PC ( 03 de diciembre de 2016)
Guerrero : marchan en Chilpancingo por la libertad de los presos de la Policía Comunitaria (14 de octubre de 2016)


Guerrero/National: Ayotzinapa Three Years Later

October 17, 2017

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September 26th, 2017, marked three years since the extrajudicial executions of six people and the forced disappearance of 43 students from the “Raul Isidro Burgos” Normal Rural School of Ayotzinapa in Iguala, Guerrero. In this context, there was a mass and a silent march in which the fathers, mothers and companions of the student teachers participated, leaving from the Angel of Independence to the Antimonumento +43 in Mexico City. Thousands of others also marched in Chihuahua, Guerrero, Jalisco, Michoacan and Chiapas, among other states, to demand that impunity end in this case.

Abel Barrera Hernandez of La Montaña Human Rights Center greeted the parents of the 43, remembering that they have spent “three years removing the debris that the holders of the PGR piled up with hundreds of files to fabricate its historical truth. With great perversity the government broadcast on television how they shredded our children. They preferred morbidity to scientific evidence.” He also stressed that although there is evidence of the Army’s participation in the disappearance of the 43, “the authorities, instead of guaranteeing an impartial investigation, close ranks to prevent progress in this line [of investigation].”

The National Commission for Human Rights (CNDH in its Spanish acronym) demanded that the investigations into the disappearance of the 43 students should consider all aspects based on objective and scientific elements and should not be ended. Meanwhile, Amnesty International Mexico warned: “For three years, we continue to look for our disappeared among the debris of corrupt institutions and the crime of oblivion, where the real political will of the authorities has never been present. The historical lie of this case will mark Peña Nieto’s six-year term, but we, in solidarity with their fathers and mothers, will continue to count them, continue to seek them, fight to bring the truth to light and have access to justice.”

 For more information in Spanish:

Tres años de impunidad: Los 43 de Ayotzinapa (Telesur, 26 de septiembre de 2017)

Fundidos en un abrazo en medio del dolor (La Jornada, 26 de septiembre de 2017)

Padres de los 43 alistan marcha silenciosa a tres años de Ayotzinapa (Proceso, 26 de septiembre de 2017)

Víctimas del desastre: del dolor a los enfrentamientos con autoridades (Aristegui Noticias, 25 de septiembre de 2017)

Foto-reportaje de la marcha silenciosa (Regeneración Radio, 26 de septiembre de 2017)

A casi 3 años, protestan en 27 Batallón por Ayotzinapa (La Jornada, 23 de septiembre de 2017)

For more information from SIPAZ:

Guerrero: plataforma Ayotzinapa: una cartografía de la violencia (19 de septiembre de 2017)

Guerrero: tercera visita del mecanismo de seguimiento de la CIDH sobre le caso Ayotzinapa a casi tres años de los hechos (7 de septiembre)

Guerrero: a 34 meses de la tragedia de Ayotzinapa familiares convocan a unas jornadas de lucha (31 de julio de 2017)


Guerrero: NGOs Ask “to guarantee victims’ rights, commnities ans individuals and human rights defenders’ organizations in the State”

October 8, 2017

OaxacaCivil Observation Mission, September 2017 (@Tlachinollan)

Within the framework of an Observation Mission conformed by Amnesty International Mexico, Serapaz, the National Network of Civil Organisms of Human Rights All Rights for All and All (TDT Network), CodigoDH and Tequio Jurídico de Oaxaca (Oaxaca Judicial Work) with the support of the International Peace Brigades (PBI) and the National Commission for Human Rights (CNDH), several meetings were held in Chilapa and Chilpancingo with relatives of victims of forced disappearance and members of human rights organizations in the state of Guerrero on September 20th. They also toured some communities in the area that have suffered forced displacement.

In their main conclusions, they pointed out that it is “unacceptable the normalization of the military presence as well as the forced displacement in different municipalities of the state of Guerrero.” Regarding the situation of family members of victims of forced disappearance, the Observation Mission “witnessed the pain and impotence derived from the impunity and indolence of the authorities responsible for guaranteeing access to justice for victims and their families.” They also express their concern “for stigmatization against human rights defenders, both by state and non-state players.”

 For more information in Spanish:

COMUNICADO | Situación de víctimas, comunidades y personas defensoras es sumamente preocupante: Misión de Observación (Red Todos los Derechos para Todas y Todos, 20 de septiembre de 2017)

Violaciones a los derechos humanos son política de Estado en Guerrero: ONG (La Jornada, 21 de septiembre de 2017)

Tras ir a Chiapas, ONG urgen a acciones de gobierno ante el grave problema de la violencia (El Sur, 21 de septiembre de 2017)

For more information from SIPAZ:

Guerrero : se declara “alerta” para proteger a defensores y defensoras de derechos humanos (19 de septiembre de 2017)


National: Mexico Shaken by Two Huge Earthquakes Faces the Shock with a Wave of Solidarity

September 30, 2017

Sismo 1Photo @ Informador

A week after the 7.1 magnitude earthquake hit the center of the country, specifically the states of Morelos, Puebla, the State of Mexico and Mexico City, the nation remains in a state of shock and uncertainty. It is the second earthquake in a short time that affects Mexico, after the September 7th earthquake that originated in the Gulf of Tehuantepec, which caused great damage in the states of Chiapas, Oaxaca and Guerrero. With a magnitude of 8.2 on the Richter scale it was also strongly perceived in the center of the country and is counted as the strongest earthquake years in the country in 100.

Until 7:00 am on September 26th, the National Seismological Service of Mexico (SSN in its Spanish acronym) had reported 5,400 replicas of the first earthquake, the two largest of 6.1 magnitude, and 39 aftershocks of the earthquake of September 19th, the largest of 4.0 magnitude. According to La Jornada, researcher Allen Leroy Husker of the Institute of Geophysics of the National Autonomous University of Mexico and attached to the SSN, “it pointed out that these figures are totally normal and correspond to the patterns that regularly occur during the days following events that had an earthquake of considerable magnitude.”

The population of the regions most affected by earthquakes, such as the Isthmus, is still afraid and worried about their safety and that of their families, as the replica chains continue to provoke collapse of homes. The numbers of victims of the earthquakes continue to increase from day to day, according to official reports on September 26th, with 333 deaths from the earthquake of 7.1 and according to another statement dated September 12th, 98 deaths from the earthquake of 8.2, although a replica on September 23rd caused two deaths in the state of Oaxaca, so obtaining definitive data is difficult. In addition thousands of homes and public buildings such as schools and hospitals were partially damaged or effectively useless due to the earthquakes. A census in the state of Chiapas reported that more than 58,000 buildings have been affected, according to the state Civil Protection Secretariat.

Lack of information and mistrust in government bodies culminates in great frustration on the part of civil society. According to a report by Desinformémonos, on the current situation in Mexico City: “The numbers are not accurate because another victim of this not so natural disaster has been reliable information. People in the streets demand to know what happened to their relatives and the government cannot or will not answer. (…) Uncertainty generates rumors that quickly fill the void in official information. The networks feed both the knowledge of the facts and the unfounded rumor.” There have also been reports of complaints by the population in Morelos, who accuse the government of alleged hoarding and political use of aid for the victims. Animal Politico reports that in videos and publications on social networks many claim that “food, sent by civil society, would be taken to the cellars and then tagged as DIF aid for the affected areas,” which has caused a lot of tension between authorities and citizens.

Faced with this great tragedy, a great source of hope has been the great support and solidarity on the part of civil society. “Surprise for foreign solidarity workers in Mexico after the earthquake,” is the title of a report by Aristegui News. In this video, Ecuador’s rescue captain stationed in Mexico City points out that “there was logistics that was not programmed by the state, but the community was organized in such an incredible way that you never lacked anything. Not even energy.” Spain’s rescue captain adds that, “everyone gives up what little they have for those affected and for those who are working … and the mobilization they have had is incredible. “

There is also the possibility of donating money to different non-governmental organizations in several emergency accounts:

Mexican Red Cross

Sismo 2.pngImage @ Cruz Roja Mexicana

Caritas México

Sismo 3.pngImage @ Caritas México

To donate:

Desastre en Chiapas y Oaxaca (Cruz Roja Mexicana)

Sismo 19 de septiembre del 2017 (Cruz Roja Mexicana)

Jornada de Oración y Colecta Humanitaria 2017 (Caritas México)

For more information in Spanish:

Sorprende a brigadistas extranjeros solidaridad en México tras sismo (Video) (Aristegui Noticias, 26 de septiembre del 2017)

La semana que cambió la Ciudad de México (Desinformémonos, 25 de septiembre del 2017)

Acusan al DIF Morelos de acaparar ayuda; el gobierno de Graco dice que solo organiza la entrega (Animal Político, 22 de septiembre del 2017)

For more information from SIPAZ:

Oaxaca : ONGs denuncian “respuesta inadecuada e insuficiente de los tres niveles de gobierno” ante desastre por el sismo (19 de septiembre del 2017)

Nacional: sismo de 8,2 grados Richter. Fuertes afectaciones en Chiapas y Oaxaca (14 de septiembre del 2017)


Guerrero: Ayotzinapa Platform: Mapping the Violence

September 26, 2017

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On September 7th, almost three years after the events, Forensic Architecture published its interactive platform in which it reconstructed what happened on the night of September 26th and 27th, 2014, when students from the Normal Rural School of Ayotzinapa were attacked by police in alleged collusion with criminal organizations. That attack in Iguala left three students dead, 43 disappeared and several seriously injured and in coma.

The Prodh Center and the Argentine Forensic Anthropology Team (EAAF in its Spanish acronym) also participated in this initiative. Videos, notes and journalistic books, photographs, telephone records and the report prepared by the International Group of Independent Experts (IGIE) were taken into account to make it.

According to the Tlachinollan Mountain Human Rights Center, with this interactive platform “the case of the forced disappearance of the 43 Ayotzinapa students has been rebuilt for the first time exhaustively and comprehensively.”

 For more information in Spanish:

Plataforma Ayotzinapa: http://www.plataforma-ayotzinapa.org/

El caso Ayotzinapa: Una cartografía de la violencia (Centro de derechos humanos de la montaña Tlachinollan, 7 de septiembre de 2017)

Introducción a la Plataforma Ayotzinapa (Proceso, 7 de septiembre de 2017)

Cartografía de la violencia: muestran en 3D y video las distintas versiones del caso Ayotzinapa (Animal Político, 9 de septiembre de 2017)

Introducción a la Plataforma Ayotzinapa (Aristegui Noticias, 7 de septiembre de 2017)

 

For more information from SIPAZ:

Guerrero: tercera visita del mecanismo de seguimiento de la CIDH sobre le caso Ayotzinapa a casi tres años de los hechos (7 de septiembre)

Guerrero: a 34 meses de la tragedia de Ayotzinapa familiares convocan a unas jornadas de lucha (31 de julio de 2017)