Guerrero: Former Chief of Police of Iguala, Fugitive after Disappearance of 43 Ayotzinapa Students, Arrested

November 1, 2016

Iguala.pngFelipe Flores Velazquez, former chief of police of Iguala, implicated in the disappearance of the 43 students. Photo@ La Jornada

On October 21, Felipe Flores Velazquez, former chief of police of Iguala, fugitive after the disappearance of the 43 student teachers from Ayotzinapa in September 2014, was arrested. It was in Iguala that elements of the Federal, marine and military police tracked him down and arrested him. The Attorney General’s Office (PGR) had announced a reward of two and a half million pesos to anyone who provided information leading to the location, arrest or detention of Flores. The former police chief is accused of organized crime, kidnapping student teachers and covering up the municipal police officers involved in the disappearance of students.

According to statements from one of those detained for the Ayotzinapa case, Felipe Flores along with the deputy police chief of Cocula, Cesar Nava Gonzalez, were the ones who handed over the 43 student teachers from Ayotzinapa to members of Guerreros Unidos on night September 26, under orders from Jose Luis Abarca, the former mayor of Iguala.

According to Animal Politico, the PGR considers his capture as key to the outcome of investigations into the Ayotzinapa case.

For more information in Spanish:

Detienen al ex jefe policial de Iguala, clave en la desaparición de los 43 normalistas (Animal político, a 21 de octubre de 2016)

Abren juicio contra Felipe Flores, el ex jefe policial de Iguala, clave en el caso Ayotzinapa (Animal político, a 26 de octubre de 2016)

For more information from SIPAZ:

Guerrero: Actualización “caso Iguala” – siguen desaparecidas 43 personas (a 3 de octubre de 2014)

 

 


Guerrero: XXI Anniversary of the Regional Coordinator of Community Authorities – Community Police

October 30, 2016

CRAC.jpgCRAC-PC march in Horcasitas. Photo@SIPAZ

On October 15, the Regional Coordinator of Community Authorities-Community Police (CRAC-PC) celebrated its 21st anniversary. For this occasion, the police, along with their liaison committees and social organizations, were convened in Atotonilco de Horcasitas from their four houses of justice in San Luis Acatlan, Ziltlaltepec, Espino Blanco and El Paraiso, for two days of activities. On the first day, four groups worked on the validation of the internal rules of the CRAC-PC, the defense of Law 701, the defense of land and territory against the mega-projects, and joining together struggles.

The second day began with a march of about 600 CRAC-PC members led by both coordinators and counselors of CRAC-PC and cabinet members of the State Government of Guerrero. After the parade the conclusions of the working groups for dialogue and a political position were presented in a plenary session. A timetable for the validation of new CRAC-PC internal rules was established and the will to reform Law 701 in favor of indigenous peoples, i.e. granting them more rights, was ratified. During the plenary session, Flores Maldonado, assistant to governor Hector Astudillo, recognized the Community Police stating that, in communities where the CRAC is present, the crime rate is significantly lower in comparison to other parts of the state such as Acapulco or the capital Chilpancingo where it is continually escalating, “while in other regions there are murders and an effervescence of those who want to commit crimes, in the areas with Community [policing] crimes are very few.”

Pablo Guzman, director of the CRAC-PC, called for respect for community policing and freedom for the members of CRAC held as prisoners for being “unjustly accused of kidnapping”, such as Arturo Campos, despite several international human rights treaties such as Convention 169 of the International Labor Organization (ILO), the Federal Constitution and Law 701 recognizing the right of indigenous peoples to have their own  justice and security system.

According to the Sur de Acapulco newspaper, security and justice community processes, represent a hope “in the middle of the crisis of violence plaguing the country, the CRAC shines as an alternative of justice and security with community roots.” The Montaña Tlachinollan Human Rights Center, noted that “despite the government’s onslaught against it and internal disputes they have fought in the past 5 years,” the CRAC-PC is still standing and upholding the right of indigenous peoples to have their own system of justice and security.

For more information in Spanish:

Celebra la CRAC su 21 aniversario (El Sur, a 16 de octubre 2016)

Desfilan enviados del gobernador con la Policía Comunitaria de la CRAC a 21 años de su fundación (El Sur, a 17 de octubre 2016)

Libres 6 autoridades comunitarias de la CRAC-PC (Centro de Derechos Humanos de la Montana Tlachinollan, a 12 de mayo de 2016)

Cumple la Crac 21 años de su creación en un contexto alejado de la promesa de unión ( La Jornada Guerrero, a 16 de octubre 2016)

En defensa de la CRAC-PC (Centro de Derechos Humanos de la Montana Tlachinollan, a 17 de octubre 2016)

EXIGE CRAC-PC RESPETO Y LIBERTAD DE PRESOS POLÍTICOS EN GUERRERO ( Bajo Palabra, , a 17 de octubre 2016)

 For more information from SIPAZ:

Guerrero: En libertad seis presos de la CRAC-PC ( a 13 de mayo de 2016)

 

 


Guerrero: Three Years of Impunity in the Rocio Mesino Murder Case

October 24, 2016

rocio

On October 19, about 100 people including social activists, members of social organizations and relatives held a ceremony at the Mexcalpetec Bridge in Atoyac, to remember Rocio Mesino Mesino, former leader of the Campesino Organization of the Southern Sierra (OCSS), three years after her assassination at that very spot. In addition to the performance of an Aztec ritual of a force of memory circle, a mural was unveiled in the community of Mexcaltepec, which was painted by the Tecuanes youth organization, and in which Rocio Mesino’s face appears. The activities carried out in the framework this third anniversary ended with a cultural evening in Atoyac the Zocalo.

At the end of the commemoration, the OCSS demanded a gender alert in the state due to the increase in femicide. Norma Mesino, Rocio’s sister, said that “they cannot be allowed to keep on killing women for being critical for thinking differently, for being activists and defending a cause, or any other woman for the fact of being a woman, that is reprehensible.” She mentioned in particular the case of Dr. Adela Rivas Obe, former Atoyac PRD councilor who was recently murdered.

Faced with impunity in the case of her sister, Norma Mesino has claimed that the government refuses to investigate the political line of investigation as the main motive and that relatives have been denied the right to copies of the file. She says, “it is a case that was well planned and the people who did this did it with total impunity and with the support of the municipal and ministerial police and the army.”

For its part, the National Network of Human Rights Defenders (RNDDHM) in Mexico, composed of 218 women defenders and journalists in 23 states, expressed “outrage at the negligent performance and remiss of the Mexican government, which has permitted that three years after the murder of the defender there is no hint of justice, despite existing evidence, and that the case had the attention of the Guerrero State Attorney. We believe that there is no justification for official inaction. This passivity reinforces the hypothesis that the murder of Rocio, member of the Campesino Organization of the Southern Sierra (OCSS) -to which the 17 campesinos killed on June 28, 1995 in Aguas Blancas belonged-, derives from her work in defense of human rights, which led her to confront the government on several occasions, denouncing, for example, acts of corruption.”

For more information in Spanish:

Efectúan ceremonia ritual en memoria de Rocío Mesino en el puente Mexcaltepec (La Jornada de Guerrero, 19 de octubre de 2016)

ONG marchan en Atoyac por el tercer aniversario del asesinato de Rocío Mesino (La Jornada de Guerrero, 19 de octubre de 2016)

A tres años del asesinato de la dirigente Rocío Mesino organizaciones exigen justicia en Atoyac (El Sur, 19 de octubre de 2016)

Pronunciamiento « Asesinato de Rocío Mesino : tres años de impunidad » (Red Nacional de Defensoras de Derechos Humanos en México, 19 de octubre de 2016)

A tres años del crimen, exige la familia de Rocío Mesino al fiscal Olea investigar su asesinato (El Sur, 18 de octubre de 2016)

Rocío Mesino, tres años (La Plaza, 16 de octubre de 2016)

 For more information from SIPAZ:

Guerrero: Impunidad a un año del asesinato de Rocío Mesino Mesino, lideresa de la OCSS (22 de octubre de 2014)

Guerrero: asesinan a luchadora social de la Organización Campesina de la Sierra del Sur (22 de octubre de 2013)

 


Guerrero: March in Chilpancingo for Release of Community Police Prisoners

October 18, 2016

CRAC.jpgPhoto @Alaide Martinez, Desinformemonos

On October 12, some 2,000 people, including prisoners’ relatives, members of the Regional Coordinator of Community Authorities – Community Police (CRAC PC), of the State Coordinator of Education Workers in Guerrero (CETEG), Section 18 the Single Union of Public Servants of the State of Guerrero (SUSPEG), as well as relatives of the 43 student teachers arrested and missing since 2014 and students from the Normal Rural School, Ayotzinapa, among others, marched in Chilpancingo in the framework of Columbus Day. The march ended with a rally in front of Government Offices.

The protesters demanded the release of the Tixtla Community Police promoter, Gonzalo Gonzalez Molina, the community policeman from the Zitlaltepec House of Justice, Samuel Ramirez Galvez, both held in the prison of Chilpancingo; as well as the advisor to the El Paraiso House of Justice, Arturo Herrera Campos, imprisoned in Ayutla de los Libres. They also called for the abrogation of the structural reforms of President Enrique Peña Nieto’s government, especially educational reform, and the presentation of the 43 student teachers from Ayotzinapa.

For more information on Spanish:

Marchan por la libertad de presos de la Policía Comunitaria (El Sur de Acapulco, 13 de octubre de 2016)

Marchan en Chilpancingo por libertad para presos de la Policía Comunitaria (Desinformémonos, 12 de octubre de 2016)

Organismos piden en Chilpancingo la libertad de comunitarios presos (La Jornada de Guerrero, 13 de octubre de 2016)

For more information from SIPAZ:

Guerrero: En libertad seis presos de la CRAC-PC (13 de mayo de 2016)

Guerrero/Nacional: Finaliza Tercer Encuentro Nacional por la Libertad de las y los Presos Políticos (29 de abril de 2016)

Guerrero/Nacional: Nestora Salgado lanza campaña para exigir la libertad de los presos políticos del país (4 de abril de 2016)

Guerrero: Autodefensa en contra del crimen organizado en 4 municipios (11 de enero de 2013)

 


International: IGIE Presents Second Report on Ayotzinapa in the European Parliament

October 8, 2016

Ayotzi1.pngProtest in front of the European Parliament. Photo @Marco Appel

On September 26, the Interdisciplinary Group of Independent Experts (IGIE) officially presented its second report on the Ayotzinapa case to the Human Rights Subcommittee of the European Parliament and also demanded “that human rights take their place in the negotiations that the European Union (EU) is currently holding with the Mexican government for the “modernization” of the free trade agreement.”

In the meeting of the subcommittee, coinciding with the second anniversary of the disappearance of the 43 student teachers from Ayotzinapa, IGIE members Francisco Cox and Claudia Paz y Paz also considered “quite disappointing” the appointment of Thomas Zeron as technical secretary of the National Council for Public Safety immediately after resigning as director of the Criminal Investigation Agency and responsible for solving the disappearance of the students. According to Cox, in an interview before his intervention at the European Parliament, “We hope that the follow-up mechanism (which the Inter-American Commission on Human Rights and the Mexican government launched) is given all the access we saw blocked at the end of our mandate.”

Before the IGIE presentation in Brussels, Amnesty International and a group of Mexican residents held a protest in Luxembourg Square, located opposite the European Parliament. “Two years later, 43 students are still missing in Mexico” read a banner in English placed on top of a monument surrounded by 43 human silhouettes with pasted photographs of the disappeared youths.

For more information in Spanish:

Pide GIEI-Ayotzinapa a Unión Europea incluir derechos humanos en renegociación del TLC (Educa, Servicios Para una Educación Alternativa A.C., a 28 de septiembre 2016)

Pide el GIEI a Eurocámara incluir derechos humanos en acuerdo comercial con México(Proceso, a 26 de septiembre 2016)

For more information from Sipaz:

Nacional: Ayotzinapa, dos años de desasosiego, dolor e impunida  (30 de septiembre de 2016)

Nacional: Se aprueba la implementación del Mecanismo de Seguimiento para el caso Ayotzinapa (30 de septiembre de 2016)

Guerrero/México: GIEI concluye su trabajo México entregando un segundo informe (28 de abril de 2016)


Guerrero: Two Student Teachers from Ayotzinapa Murdered

October 8, 2016

Ayotzi.pngDesinformémonos Photo @Aurora Roja

On October 4 (5:50 pm), five passengers were shot dead during an assault on public transport, including the students from the Ayotzinapa Normal Rural School: Johnatan Morales Hernandez and Filemon Tacuba Castro.

The Ministry of Public Security of the state confirmed that it was an armed assault on the Chilpancingo-Tixtla road. According Sur newspaper “and according to an audio broadcast on social networks, the attackers were inside the unit and knew that several of the occupants were students from Ayotzinapa.”

The attackers killed the students Jonatan Morales Hernandez, a fourth-year student, Group A of Saucito community in the Municipality of Tecoanapa, and Filemon Tacuba Castro, also a fourth-year student, Group B, from Apantla, Ayutla de los Libres Municipality, Guerrero.

Jonatan Hernandez Morales and Filemon Tacuba Castro were travelling with others on public transport from Chilpancingo to Tixtla where the Normal school is located. “A source from the State Police reported that two victims died where the assault occurred and the other three died while receiving medical care.” The other gunshot victims are a woman, a girl and an eight-year-old boy.

According to Radio Formula, “with great sadness and pain, the parents of the 43 students missing from Iguala on September 26, 2014, as well as the students of the Raul Isidro Burgos Normal Rural School said farewell” this October 5 to the two murdered youths recalling that “they can cut all the flowers, but never stop the spring.”

For more information in Spanish:

Confirman normalistas de Ayotzinapa asesinato de dos de sus compañeros en carretera Chilpancingo-Tixtla (Desinformémonos, a 5 de octubre 2016)

Matan en Chilpancingo a cinco pasajeros de una Urvan; dos eran alumnos de Ayotzinapa (El Sur periódico de Guerrero, a 5 de octubre 2016)
Velan en normal de Ayotzinapa a estudiantes asesinados, padres de 43 condenan su muerte ( RadioFórmula, a 05 de octubre de 2016)

For more information from Sipaz:

Nacional: Ayotzinapa, dos años de desasosiego, dolor e impunidad

Nacional: Se aprueba la implementación del Mecanismo de Seguimiento para el caso Ayotzinapa


National: The CNDH Presents its Report on Recommendations on Human Rights Violations

September 29, 2016

SE CNDHLuis Raul Gonzalez Perez, CNDH president, Photo@Luis Barrón, SinEmbargo

On June 8, National Human Rights Commission (CNDH) presented its report on recommendations for human rights violations in Mexico City.

According to the CNDH, the states that have received the most recommendations from 1990 to the present are Guerrero, Oaxaca, Chiapas, Mexico City and Veracruz.

The commission’s report states, “that in the last 26 years 2,537 recommendations were issued to 1,102 authorities, of which 361 are still pending compliance with some of the recommended points.”

Raul Gonzalez Perez, president of the CNDH, stated “that the federal authorities with the most recommendations are the Attorney General’s Office (PGR), the Mexican Social Security Institute (IMSS), the Secretariat of National Defense (Sedena) and the executive powers of Chiapas and Oaxaca, with 105 and 104 cases respectively.”

The report notes that, “[in] the breakdown by state, the Guerrero authorities top the list with 136, followed by Oaxaca with 134, Chiapas with 127, Mexico City with 100 and Veracruz with 93.” The 320 outstanding recommendations are related to 530 issued between 2011 and 2016, of which 60 percent have not been met in full.

The National Security Commission (CNS), IMSS, PGR, the Department of Defense and the Governor of Guerrero are the authorities that must fulfill most of the recommendations. “Some 28 of these outstanding recommendations are more than six years old, 57 between four and six, 132 three to four, 128 between one and two, and 16 less than a year.”

According to Sin Embargo, the most important points of non-compliance with these recommendations are “related to guarantees of non-repetition, attention to victims and processes to determine administrative and criminal responsibilities of public servants.”

For more information in Spanish:

Guerrero, Oaxaca, Chiapas y la CdMx, los estados que más violan los derechos humanos: CNDH (Sin Embargo, a 08 de julio 2016)