Guerrero: Three Years of Impunity in the Rocio Mesino Murder Case

October 24, 2016


On October 19, about 100 people including social activists, members of social organizations and relatives held a ceremony at the Mexcalpetec Bridge in Atoyac, to remember Rocio Mesino Mesino, former leader of the Campesino Organization of the Southern Sierra (OCSS), three years after her assassination at that very spot. In addition to the performance of an Aztec ritual of a force of memory circle, a mural was unveiled in the community of Mexcaltepec, which was painted by the Tecuanes youth organization, and in which Rocio Mesino’s face appears. The activities carried out in the framework this third anniversary ended with a cultural evening in Atoyac the Zocalo.

At the end of the commemoration, the OCSS demanded a gender alert in the state due to the increase in femicide. Norma Mesino, Rocio’s sister, said that “they cannot be allowed to keep on killing women for being critical for thinking differently, for being activists and defending a cause, or any other woman for the fact of being a woman, that is reprehensible.” She mentioned in particular the case of Dr. Adela Rivas Obe, former Atoyac PRD councilor who was recently murdered.

Faced with impunity in the case of her sister, Norma Mesino has claimed that the government refuses to investigate the political line of investigation as the main motive and that relatives have been denied the right to copies of the file. She says, “it is a case that was well planned and the people who did this did it with total impunity and with the support of the municipal and ministerial police and the army.”

For its part, the National Network of Human Rights Defenders (RNDDHM) in Mexico, composed of 218 women defenders and journalists in 23 states, expressed “outrage at the negligent performance and remiss of the Mexican government, which has permitted that three years after the murder of the defender there is no hint of justice, despite existing evidence, and that the case had the attention of the Guerrero State Attorney. We believe that there is no justification for official inaction. This passivity reinforces the hypothesis that the murder of Rocio, member of the Campesino Organization of the Southern Sierra (OCSS) -to which the 17 campesinos killed on June 28, 1995 in Aguas Blancas belonged-, derives from her work in defense of human rights, which led her to confront the government on several occasions, denouncing, for example, acts of corruption.”

For more information in Spanish:

Efectúan ceremonia ritual en memoria de Rocío Mesino en el puente Mexcaltepec (La Jornada de Guerrero, 19 de octubre de 2016)

ONG marchan en Atoyac por el tercer aniversario del asesinato de Rocío Mesino (La Jornada de Guerrero, 19 de octubre de 2016)

A tres años del asesinato de la dirigente Rocío Mesino organizaciones exigen justicia en Atoyac (El Sur, 19 de octubre de 2016)

Pronunciamiento « Asesinato de Rocío Mesino : tres años de impunidad » (Red Nacional de Defensoras de Derechos Humanos en México, 19 de octubre de 2016)

A tres años del crimen, exige la familia de Rocío Mesino al fiscal Olea investigar su asesinato (El Sur, 18 de octubre de 2016)

Rocío Mesino, tres años (La Plaza, 16 de octubre de 2016)

 For more information from SIPAZ:

Guerrero: Impunidad a un año del asesinato de Rocío Mesino Mesino, lideresa de la OCSS (22 de octubre de 2014)

Guerrero: asesinan a luchadora social de la Organización Campesina de la Sierra del Sur (22 de octubre de 2013)


Guerrero: March in Chilpancingo for Release of Community Police Prisoners

October 18, 2016

CRAC.jpgPhoto @Alaide Martinez, Desinformemonos

On October 12, some 2,000 people, including prisoners’ relatives, members of the Regional Coordinator of Community Authorities – Community Police (CRAC PC), of the State Coordinator of Education Workers in Guerrero (CETEG), Section 18 the Single Union of Public Servants of the State of Guerrero (SUSPEG), as well as relatives of the 43 student teachers arrested and missing since 2014 and students from the Normal Rural School, Ayotzinapa, among others, marched in Chilpancingo in the framework of Columbus Day. The march ended with a rally in front of Government Offices.

The protesters demanded the release of the Tixtla Community Police promoter, Gonzalo Gonzalez Molina, the community policeman from the Zitlaltepec House of Justice, Samuel Ramirez Galvez, both held in the prison of Chilpancingo; as well as the advisor to the El Paraiso House of Justice, Arturo Herrera Campos, imprisoned in Ayutla de los Libres. They also called for the abrogation of the structural reforms of President Enrique Peña Nieto’s government, especially educational reform, and the presentation of the 43 student teachers from Ayotzinapa.

For more information on Spanish:

Marchan por la libertad de presos de la Policía Comunitaria (El Sur de Acapulco, 13 de octubre de 2016)

Marchan en Chilpancingo por libertad para presos de la Policía Comunitaria (Desinformémonos, 12 de octubre de 2016)

Organismos piden en Chilpancingo la libertad de comunitarios presos (La Jornada de Guerrero, 13 de octubre de 2016)

For more information from SIPAZ:

Guerrero: En libertad seis presos de la CRAC-PC (13 de mayo de 2016)

Guerrero/Nacional: Finaliza Tercer Encuentro Nacional por la Libertad de las y los Presos Políticos (29 de abril de 2016)

Guerrero/Nacional: Nestora Salgado lanza campaña para exigir la libertad de los presos políticos del país (4 de abril de 2016)

Guerrero: Autodefensa en contra del crimen organizado en 4 municipios (11 de enero de 2013)


International: IGIE Presents Second Report on Ayotzinapa in the European Parliament

October 8, 2016

Ayotzi1.pngProtest in front of the European Parliament. Photo @Marco Appel

On September 26, the Interdisciplinary Group of Independent Experts (IGIE) officially presented its second report on the Ayotzinapa case to the Human Rights Subcommittee of the European Parliament and also demanded “that human rights take their place in the negotiations that the European Union (EU) is currently holding with the Mexican government for the “modernization” of the free trade agreement.”

In the meeting of the subcommittee, coinciding with the second anniversary of the disappearance of the 43 student teachers from Ayotzinapa, IGIE members Francisco Cox and Claudia Paz y Paz also considered “quite disappointing” the appointment of Thomas Zeron as technical secretary of the National Council for Public Safety immediately after resigning as director of the Criminal Investigation Agency and responsible for solving the disappearance of the students. According to Cox, in an interview before his intervention at the European Parliament, “We hope that the follow-up mechanism (which the Inter-American Commission on Human Rights and the Mexican government launched) is given all the access we saw blocked at the end of our mandate.”

Before the IGIE presentation in Brussels, Amnesty International and a group of Mexican residents held a protest in Luxembourg Square, located opposite the European Parliament. “Two years later, 43 students are still missing in Mexico” read a banner in English placed on top of a monument surrounded by 43 human silhouettes with pasted photographs of the disappeared youths.

For more information in Spanish:

Pide GIEI-Ayotzinapa a Unión Europea incluir derechos humanos en renegociación del TLC (Educa, Servicios Para una Educación Alternativa A.C., a 28 de septiembre 2016)

Pide el GIEI a Eurocámara incluir derechos humanos en acuerdo comercial con México(Proceso, a 26 de septiembre 2016)

For more information from Sipaz:

Nacional: Ayotzinapa, dos años de desasosiego, dolor e impunida  (30 de septiembre de 2016)

Nacional: Se aprueba la implementación del Mecanismo de Seguimiento para el caso Ayotzinapa (30 de septiembre de 2016)

Guerrero/México: GIEI concluye su trabajo México entregando un segundo informe (28 de abril de 2016)

Guerrero: Two Student Teachers from Ayotzinapa Murdered

October 8, 2016

Ayotzi.pngDesinformémonos Photo @Aurora Roja

On October 4 (5:50 pm), five passengers were shot dead during an assault on public transport, including the students from the Ayotzinapa Normal Rural School: Johnatan Morales Hernandez and Filemon Tacuba Castro.

The Ministry of Public Security of the state confirmed that it was an armed assault on the Chilpancingo-Tixtla road. According Sur newspaper “and according to an audio broadcast on social networks, the attackers were inside the unit and knew that several of the occupants were students from Ayotzinapa.”

The attackers killed the students Jonatan Morales Hernandez, a fourth-year student, Group A of Saucito community in the Municipality of Tecoanapa, and Filemon Tacuba Castro, also a fourth-year student, Group B, from Apantla, Ayutla de los Libres Municipality, Guerrero.

Jonatan Hernandez Morales and Filemon Tacuba Castro were travelling with others on public transport from Chilpancingo to Tixtla where the Normal school is located. “A source from the State Police reported that two victims died where the assault occurred and the other three died while receiving medical care.” The other gunshot victims are a woman, a girl and an eight-year-old boy.

According to Radio Formula, “with great sadness and pain, the parents of the 43 students missing from Iguala on September 26, 2014, as well as the students of the Raul Isidro Burgos Normal Rural School said farewell” this October 5 to the two murdered youths recalling that “they can cut all the flowers, but never stop the spring.”

For more information in Spanish:

Confirman normalistas de Ayotzinapa asesinato de dos de sus compañeros en carretera Chilpancingo-Tixtla (Desinformémonos, a 5 de octubre 2016)

Matan en Chilpancingo a cinco pasajeros de una Urvan; dos eran alumnos de Ayotzinapa (El Sur periódico de Guerrero, a 5 de octubre 2016)
Velan en normal de Ayotzinapa a estudiantes asesinados, padres de 43 condenan su muerte ( RadioFórmula, a 05 de octubre de 2016)

For more information from Sipaz:

Nacional: Ayotzinapa, dos años de desasosiego, dolor e impunidad

Nacional: Se aprueba la implementación del Mecanismo de Seguimiento para el caso Ayotzinapa

National: The CNDH Presents its Report on Recommendations on Human Rights Violations

September 29, 2016

SE CNDHLuis Raul Gonzalez Perez, CNDH president, Photo@Luis Barrón, SinEmbargo

On June 8, National Human Rights Commission (CNDH) presented its report on recommendations for human rights violations in Mexico City.

According to the CNDH, the states that have received the most recommendations from 1990 to the present are Guerrero, Oaxaca, Chiapas, Mexico City and Veracruz.

The commission’s report states, “that in the last 26 years 2,537 recommendations were issued to 1,102 authorities, of which 361 are still pending compliance with some of the recommended points.”

Raul Gonzalez Perez, president of the CNDH, stated “that the federal authorities with the most recommendations are the Attorney General’s Office (PGR), the Mexican Social Security Institute (IMSS), the Secretariat of National Defense (Sedena) and the executive powers of Chiapas and Oaxaca, with 105 and 104 cases respectively.”

The report notes that, “[in] the breakdown by state, the Guerrero authorities top the list with 136, followed by Oaxaca with 134, Chiapas with 127, Mexico City with 100 and Veracruz with 93.” The 320 outstanding recommendations are related to 530 issued between 2011 and 2016, of which 60 percent have not been met in full.

The National Security Commission (CNS), IMSS, PGR, the Department of Defense and the Governor of Guerrero are the authorities that must fulfill most of the recommendations. “Some 28 of these outstanding recommendations are more than six years old, 57 between four and six, 132 three to four, 128 between one and two, and 16 less than a year.”

According to Sin Embargo, the most important points of non-compliance with these recommendations are “related to guarantees of non-repetition, attention to victims and processes to determine administrative and criminal responsibilities of public servants.”

For more information in Spanish:

Guerrero, Oaxaca, Chiapas y la CdMx, los estados que más violan los derechos humanos: CNDH (Sin Embargo, a 08 de julio 2016)


National: March for Resignation of Enrique Peña Nieto

September 28, 2016

epnCall for march for resignation of Peña Nieto

On September 15, the symbolic commemoration day of “El Grito” – the cry for the Independence of Mexico – thousands of people responded to the call launched on social networks for a march to demand the resignation of Enrique Peña Nieto.

#RenunciaYa, is the hashtag with which this non-partisan demonstration was called for on social networks since September 2, just after the publication of the Government’s fourth report. Led by parents of the 43 student teachers from Ayotzinapa, followed by farmers from Atenco, machete in hand, about 4,000 citizens, mostly young, began the #RenunciaYa protest, according to Animal Politico. The protesters left the Angel of Independence monument with the aim of reaching the Zocalo to face the president. However, at the Palace of Fine Arts, thousands of riot police, deployed by the Ministry of Public Security of Mexico City, blocked their passage. However, in the Zocalo, a small group of protesters who had managed get through started whistling and shouting slogans against the president just as President Enrique Peña Nieto appeared. According to La Jornada, “a young man showed a poster criticizing the federal administration and was immediately surrounded by elements of the Federal and Presidential Police. Some people demanded that the police allow the youth to express himself, to which they responded “we are only following orders.” Federal Police kept the young man surrounded until the fireworks ended, he was photographed and they made video of the youth and finally two policemen said they would accompany him to the exit.”

In Chiapas, the governor, Manuel Velasco Coello, did “El Grito” from an alternative site to the square of Tuxtla Gutierrez, as it was occupied by teachers opposed to the education reform bill.

For their part, the Las Abejas of Acteal Civil Society Organization, in their last statement, give several examples of why, according to them, “there is no longer independence.” They claim that, “this heroic and historic struggle for the independence of Mexico […] has been betrayed by the PRI governments and other political parties in Mexico who have been in power.” Because “The idea of the struggle, independence in 1810, meant that Mexico was independent, sovereign, democratic. […] However, the edge of that independence began to end with the government of Carlos Salinas de Gortari with agreements and commercial, political and military treaties with neoliberal and capitalist countries, one of them is: the North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA) between Mexico, the United States and Canada.”

In addition, the Xinich’ Coordinator of Social Organizations remembered September 15 with a statement in which it demands the removal of Enrique Peña Nieto as an “incompetent” in addition to “delivering our nation into the hands of foreigners.” It also expressed support for the struggle of the teachers against the so-called educational reform and demanded “the repeal of structural reforms, justice for the people massacred at Viejo Velasco, Acteal, for the 43 disappeared student teachers of Ayotzinapa, for Nochixtlan, Oaxaca, compliance with the San Andrés agreements signed between the federal government and the EZLN…”

 In Oaxaca, in the state capital, the governor, Cué Monteagudo, did his sixth and last “Grito” from the balcony of the government palace amid shouts of “murderer” and “traitor”. According to Educa, “elements of the State Police prevented the entry of teachers from Section 22 into the square to give their alternative ‘Grito’ with teargas, sparking a confrontation”. At least 20 people sustained minor injuries.

For more information in Spanish:

En méxico ya no existe independencia, es por las mal llamadas reformas constitucionales (Las abejas de Acteal, 22 de septembre de 2016)

#Chiapas Xinich’ recordó el “15 de Septiembre” exigiendo la renuncia de EPN, la abrogación de las reformas estructurales y el cumplimientos de los “Acuerdos de San Andrés” (Koman Iles, 20 de septiembre)

Marchan para exigir la renuncia de Peña Nieto (La Jornada, a 16 de septiembre 2016)

15 de septiembre: Policías repliegan marchas en Oaxaca y Chiapas (Educa, a 15 de septiembre 2016)

Miles de personas dan el Grito en el Zócalo (La Jornada, a 15 de septiembre 2016)

Renuncia ya y los acarreados: dos marchas rumbo al Zócalo (Animal político, a 16 de septiembre 2016)

Hay apertura para la crítica, dice presidencia sobre posible rechifla a Peña durante el Grito (Animal político, a 14 de septiembre 2016)

15 razones para marchar y gritar #RenunciaYA (Animal político, a 6 de septiembre 2016)

Ciudadanos convocan a marchar hoy 15 de septiembre para exigir renuncia de Peña (Animal político, a 2 de septiembre 2016)

 For more information from Sipaz:

Nacional : cuarto informe del gobierno de Peña Nieto (12 de septiembre 2016)


National: Back to School with no Sign of Resumption of Dialogue between Teachers and Government

September 27, 2016

teachersTeachers’ movement sit-in in, Tuxtla Gutierrez, September 11 @ SIPAZ

On September 19, teachers of Sections 7 and 40 of the National Union of Education Workers (SNTE) in Chiapas began the 2016-2017 school year after four months of work stoppage to demand the repeal of the education reform bill, passed in 2013. Section 22 in Oaxaca had done the same since September 7. In both cases, no incidents occurred.

Now that school activities have returned to normal throughout the country, teachers’ leaders reiterated their call for the federal government to return to the national negotiating table. They told media that they maintain their three axes of struggle: “strengthen the reorganization stage, promote legislative means to respond to our demand for repeal of educational reform and continue the construction of an alternative education proposal.”

The head of the Federal Ministry of Public Education (SEP), Aurelio Nuño Mayer, has maintained his position: there will be dialogue in Michoacan, Guerrero, Oaxaca and Chiapas “to be able to settle local issues in these four states; that is to say administrative problems.” He reiterated that under no circumstances will they accept tables to discuss the repeal of educational reform.

For more information in Spanish:

Nuño: pese a conflicto con la CNTE, las clases están plenamente restauradas (La Jornada, 24 de septiembre de 2016)

CNTE insiste al gobierno que regrese a negociar (La Jornada, 24 de septiembre de 2016)

Sección 22 de la CNTE pacta pagos y ascensos con el gobierno (Proceso, 23 de septiembre de 2016)

Regresan a clases tras 120 días de paro magisterial en Chiapas (La Jornada, 19 de septiembre de 2016)

‘‘Nos dejaron solos’’, reprochan varios docentes de Chiapas a los de Oaxaca (7 de septiembre de 2016)

En el eventual diálogo con la CNTE sólo se tratarán temas administrativos: Nuño (La Jornada, 6 de septiembre de 2016)

Los 114 días que sacudieron a México (La Jornada, 6 de septiembre de 2016)

For more information from SIPAZ:

Nacional : impasse en dialogo entre el Magisterio y el gobierno; parcial regreso a clases (2 de septiembre de 2016)

Chiapas: Desalojo violento hacia el plantón de maestros y maestras en San Cristóbal de Las Casas (22 de julio de 2016)

Oaxaca/ Nacional: La CNTE y la Segob acuerdan mesas de negociación (13 de julio de 2016)

Oaxaca: Organizaciones de Derechos Humanos presentan informe sobre represión en Nochixtlán (11 de julio de 2016)


Chiapas/Oaxaca: Actualización de las protestas magisteriales; al menos 6 muertos en Oaxaca (21 de junio de 2016)