National/International: Visit of the United Nations Special Rapporteur on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples to Mexico Ends

November 23, 2017

UNPhoto: @frayba

From November 5th to 17th, the United Nations Special Rapporteur on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples, Victoria Tauli-Corpuz, indigenous leader of the Philippines, made an official visit to Mexico, which included the capitals of the states of Guerrero, Chiapas and Chihuahua. She met with more than 200 representatives of 23 indigenous peoples, civil organizations defending their rights and officials at all levels.

At the end of his visit, she declared that “the current inadequate legal recognition of indigenous peoples as holders of rights, together with structural discrimination, are at the basis of all the issues and concerns” in the areas “lands and territories; autonomy, self-determination and political participation; self-ascription of indigenous peoples; access to justice; violence and impunity; the right to determine their development priorities; consultation and free, prior and informed consent; economic, social and cultural rights, and the particular situation of specific sectors of indigenous peoples.” While acknowledging “Mexico’s support for advancing the indigenous agenda in international forums,” “this commitment must be coherent and should be reflected in the application of these standards in Mexico.”

On the controversial issue of the consultation, she said that “even in the absence of national legislation on this issue, Mexico already has the obligation to consult indigenous peoples on any activity or legislative or administrative measures that could affect them according to the standards of the ILO Convention 169, the Inter-American jurisprudence and the UN Declaration. The adoption of specific legislation is not the only mechanism to apply the right to consultation and the fact that there is no single model for consultation should also be taken into account, since each indigenous people has its own authorities and decision-making processes.”

The rapporteur also stressed that “the initiatives of indigenous peoples in the area of ​​autonomy and self-government should enjoy greater recognition, and be recognized and incorporated into the overall political structure of the country. In addition to self-government, indigenous peoples have the right to participate fully, if they so wish, in the political life of the country. I have seen some positive developments that could facilitate the political participation of indigenous peoples in this area, such as the possibility of registering independent candidacies.”

For more information in Spanish:

Relatora de la ONU constata violaciones a derechos de indígenas en Chiapas (Proceso, 15 de noviembre de 2017)

Declaración de cierre de Misión a México (Victoria Tauli-Corpuz, ONU, 17 de noviembre de 2017)

Discriminación indígena persiste por falta de voluntad política: ONU (La Jornada, 17 de noviembre de 2017)

Indígenas no son consultados sobre megaproyectos que afectan su territorio en México: ONU (Aristegui Noticias, 17 de noviembre de 2017)

Relatora Especial sobre Derechos de los Pueblos Indígenas de la ONU visita Guerrero (Boletín de prensa, Tlachinollan, Guerrero, 14 de noviembre de 2017)

Pueblos indígenas presentan recomendaciones ante ONU (Boletín de prensa, Chiapas,15 de noviembre de 2017)

For more information from SIPAZ:

Nacional – México: Visita de la Relatora especial de la ONU sobre derechos de los pueblos indígenas (8 de noviembre de 2017)

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National–Mexico: Visit of UN Special Rapporteur on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples

November 12, 2017

UNSR.pngVictoria Tauli-Corpuz, UN Special Rapporteur on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples. Photo@: unwomen.org

The United Nations Special Rapporteur on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples, Victoria Tauli-Corpuz, will make an official visit to Mexico from November 8th to 17th, 2017.

She will visit Mexico City and the states of Guerrero, Chiapas and Oaxaca to meet with representatives of indigenous peoples in order to learn about the problems that affect the communities of these territories. According to La Jornada, the main issues to be addressed will be discrimination, autonomy and indigenous territories, harmonization of domestic legislation, mega-projects, access to justice and the impact of violence on women and indigenous peoples. The Special Rapporteur will also hold meetings with government officials, the National Commission for Human Rights and the National Electoral Institute.

The Tlachinollan Mountain Center for Human Rights underlined that “Mrs. Tauli-Corpuz is an indigenous leader of the Cordillera region in the Philippines. She has worked for more than three decades in the construction of movements in favor of indigenous peoples and is a tenacious defender of women’s rights.”

For more information in Spanish:

Guerrero en la agenda de la ONU ( Centre de Derechos Humanos de la montaña de Guerrero Tlachinollan, 6 de noviembre de 2017)

Anuncian visita oficial de Relatora de ONU sobre Derechos de Pueblos Indígenas (Proceso, 7 de noviembre de 2017)

Relatora especial de la ONU se reunirá con representantes en México (La Jornada de Oriente, 8 de noviembre de 2017)

Indígenas llevan a ONU abusos de megaproyectos; pintan al Estado mexicano como un verdugo más (Sín Embargo, 8 de noviembre de 2017)


Guerrero: Ayotzinapa, Third Official Audience of the IACHR : “The Government Doesn’t Want to Solve the Case”

October 29, 2017

AYOTZI.jpg

On October 24th, the third ex officio hearing was held at the Inter-American Commission on Human Rights (CIDH in its Spanish acronym) on the Special Monitoring Mechanism (MES in its Spanish acronym) for the Ayotzinapa case in Montevideo (Uruguay).

According to La Jornada, the IACHR pointed out that “Failure to solve an event of this nature in three years does not mean anything other than that the federal government has not wanted to solve it.” It warned that although “the federal government has banked on the exhaustion of the parents” itwill not abandon the families, nor the case.

At the hearing, it was evident that the Mexican State has not detained any Huitzuco police or Federal Police, has not held any military officer responsible, and has not advanced in order to hold the Guerrero authorities accountable. Therefore, the Tlachinollan Mountain Human Rights Center affirmed that “the Mexican State continues to administer the case for political purposes unrelated to the victims’ justice efforts, given that in each hearing or meeting it doses the information and advances presented” and is convinced that “the Attorney General covers up officials who obstructed the investigation such as Tomas Zeron de Lucio.”

For more information in Spanish:


No hay avances sustanciales en el caso Ayotzinapa, denunciaron en audiencia de la CIDH (Centro de derechos humanos de la montaña Tlachinollan, 24 de octubre de 2017)

“Inconcebible”, tres años sin respuesta por Ayotzinapa: CIDH (La Jornada, 24 de octubre de 2017)

Audiencia en la CIDH: “Premian a Zerón por Ayotzinapa, y cesan a Santiago Nieto por Odebrecht” (Sin Embargo, 25 de octubre de 2017)

Ayotzinapa: la lucha sigue (La Jornada Guerrero, 25 de octubre de 2017)

Retoma la PGR las cuatro líneas de investigación propuestas por el GIEI para el caso Ayotzinapa ( El Sur Acapulco, 26 de octubre de 2017)

For more information from SIPAZ:

Guerrero: tercera visita del mecanismo de seguimiento de la CIDH sobre le caso Ayotzinapa a casi tres años de los hechos (7 de septiembre)

Guerrero: Sesión de seguimiento de la CIDH del caso Ayotzinapa : avances nulos (10 de julio de 2017)

Guerrero/ Nacional: Madres y padres de los 43 consideran no acudir a la reunión con la PGR y la CIDH (20 de abril de 2017)


October 18, 2017

SIPAZFrayba

San Cristobal de Las Casas, Chiapas, Mexico, October 12th, 2017.

Joint communiqué.

International accompaniment and observation of human rights

The Fray Bartolome de Las Casas Center for Human Rights, (Frayba) and the International Peace Service (SIPAZ) report that they will be accompanying the caravan organized in the framework of the tour of the National Indigenous Congress and the Indigenous Council of Government, which will take place from October 13th to 19th of this year in the state of Chiapas according to the following announced program:

Friday, October 13th, 2017.- Start of caravan to Las Margaritas.

Saturday, October 14th, 2017.- Village of Guadalupe Tepeyac.

Sunday, October 15th, 2017.- Morelia Caracol.

Monday, October 16th, 2017.- La Garrucha Caracol.

Tuesday October 17th, 2017 .- Roberto Barrios Caracol.

Wednesday, October 18th, 2017.- Palenque.

Thursday October 19th, 2017.- Oventik Caracol.

The objective of the accompaniment will be to provide a presence for observation and documentation for the respect of human rights in the course of the caravan and in the planned events. Regrettably, in the face of the denunciations made by the National Indigenous Congress (CNI in its Spanish acronym) in recent months, which have included threats, attacks and aggressions, we see this deterrent presence as necessary. We consider it important that these activities be carried out with peace of mind, as part of a peaceful organizational effort aimed at defending the rights of indigenous peoples in the country.

The present communiqué is to inform the Mexican authorities and international human rights bodies, so that in their area of ​​competence, they provide guarantees of protection to the caravan, which we reiterate, is a civil and peaceful action.

In the same way, we ask for guarantees of respect and protection of the integrity and safety of the members of the caravan, the right to life, and individual and collective rights and freedoms, guaranteeing in the immediate future the necessary conditions to carry out the caravan, without police accompaniment being considered in the activities.

The members of SIPAZ will be present in the activities wearing vests with the organization logo and the text ‘international observer’.

The members of the Frayba will be accompanying the Caravan as human rights observers.

See: https://www.congresonacionalindigena.org/

We call for permanent accompaniment by international human rights organizations.

We call for national and international solidarity to demand the Mexican State in its three levels of government:

1.- Guarantee the work of human rights defenders in Mexico.

2.- Immediately adopt appropriate measures to guarantee the safety and physical integrity of the members of the Caravan of the National Indigenous Congress as well as the Indigenous Council of Government.

3.- Ensure the implementation of the provisions of the Declaration on Human Rights Defenders, adopted by the UN General Assembly on December 9th, 1998.

4.- In general, ensure respect for human rights and fundamental freedoms throughout the country in accordance with international human rights standards ratified by Mexico.

We declare that we will be attentive at all points of the tour, with the aim of ensuring respect for human rights and documenting any security incident.

This communiqué has been sent to the authorities of the Mexican State, as well as to international human rights bodies.

For more information:

Congreso Nacional Indígena (CNI)

Este sábado se registra Marichuy, la aspirante presidencial zapatista (El Proceso, 6 de octubre de 2017)

La aspirante indígena a la presidencia de México rechaza dinero público para su campaña (El País, 9 de octubre de 2017)

Para más información en ingles:

Mexico’s Indigenous Congress: Decolonising politics (Al Jazeera, 27 de septiembre de 2017)

Zapatista-Backed Indigenous Woman Registers to Run for Mexican Presidency (teleSUR, 7 de octubre de 2017)

For more information from SIPAZ:

Chiapas/Nacional : Candidata presidencial “no es decisión de una persona” (Subcomandante Moíses) (15 de noviembre de 2016)

Chiapas / Nacional : CNI y EZLN realizarán consulta para nombrar a una candidata indígena hacia las elecciones presidenciales de 2018 (15 de octubre de 2016)


Guerrero: NGOs Ask “to guarantee victims’ rights, commnities ans individuals and human rights defenders’ organizations in the State”

October 8, 2017

OaxacaCivil Observation Mission, September 2017 (@Tlachinollan)

Within the framework of an Observation Mission conformed by Amnesty International Mexico, Serapaz, the National Network of Civil Organisms of Human Rights All Rights for All and All (TDT Network), CodigoDH and Tequio Jurídico de Oaxaca (Oaxaca Judicial Work) with the support of the International Peace Brigades (PBI) and the National Commission for Human Rights (CNDH), several meetings were held in Chilapa and Chilpancingo with relatives of victims of forced disappearance and members of human rights organizations in the state of Guerrero on September 20th. They also toured some communities in the area that have suffered forced displacement.

In their main conclusions, they pointed out that it is “unacceptable the normalization of the military presence as well as the forced displacement in different municipalities of the state of Guerrero.” Regarding the situation of family members of victims of forced disappearance, the Observation Mission “witnessed the pain and impotence derived from the impunity and indolence of the authorities responsible for guaranteeing access to justice for victims and their families.” They also express their concern “for stigmatization against human rights defenders, both by state and non-state players.”

 For more information in Spanish:

COMUNICADO | Situación de víctimas, comunidades y personas defensoras es sumamente preocupante: Misión de Observación (Red Todos los Derechos para Todas y Todos, 20 de septiembre de 2017)

Violaciones a los derechos humanos son política de Estado en Guerrero: ONG (La Jornada, 21 de septiembre de 2017)

Tras ir a Chiapas, ONG urgen a acciones de gobierno ante el grave problema de la violencia (El Sur, 21 de septiembre de 2017)

For more information from SIPAZ:

Guerrero : se declara “alerta” para proteger a defensores y defensoras de derechos humanos (19 de septiembre de 2017)


National: Mexico Shaken by Two Huge Earthquakes Faces the Shock with a Wave of Solidarity

September 30, 2017

Sismo 1Photo @ Informador

A week after the 7.1 magnitude earthquake hit the center of the country, specifically the states of Morelos, Puebla, the State of Mexico and Mexico City, the nation remains in a state of shock and uncertainty. It is the second earthquake in a short time that affects Mexico, after the September 7th earthquake that originated in the Gulf of Tehuantepec, which caused great damage in the states of Chiapas, Oaxaca and Guerrero. With a magnitude of 8.2 on the Richter scale it was also strongly perceived in the center of the country and is counted as the strongest earthquake years in the country in 100.

Until 7:00 am on September 26th, the National Seismological Service of Mexico (SSN in its Spanish acronym) had reported 5,400 replicas of the first earthquake, the two largest of 6.1 magnitude, and 39 aftershocks of the earthquake of September 19th, the largest of 4.0 magnitude. According to La Jornada, researcher Allen Leroy Husker of the Institute of Geophysics of the National Autonomous University of Mexico and attached to the SSN, “it pointed out that these figures are totally normal and correspond to the patterns that regularly occur during the days following events that had an earthquake of considerable magnitude.”

The population of the regions most affected by earthquakes, such as the Isthmus, is still afraid and worried about their safety and that of their families, as the replica chains continue to provoke collapse of homes. The numbers of victims of the earthquakes continue to increase from day to day, according to official reports on September 26th, with 333 deaths from the earthquake of 7.1 and according to another statement dated September 12th, 98 deaths from the earthquake of 8.2, although a replica on September 23rd caused two deaths in the state of Oaxaca, so obtaining definitive data is difficult. In addition thousands of homes and public buildings such as schools and hospitals were partially damaged or effectively useless due to the earthquakes. A census in the state of Chiapas reported that more than 58,000 buildings have been affected, according to the state Civil Protection Secretariat.

Lack of information and mistrust in government bodies culminates in great frustration on the part of civil society. According to a report by Desinformémonos, on the current situation in Mexico City: “The numbers are not accurate because another victim of this not so natural disaster has been reliable information. People in the streets demand to know what happened to their relatives and the government cannot or will not answer. (…) Uncertainty generates rumors that quickly fill the void in official information. The networks feed both the knowledge of the facts and the unfounded rumor.” There have also been reports of complaints by the population in Morelos, who accuse the government of alleged hoarding and political use of aid for the victims. Animal Politico reports that in videos and publications on social networks many claim that “food, sent by civil society, would be taken to the cellars and then tagged as DIF aid for the affected areas,” which has caused a lot of tension between authorities and citizens.

Faced with this great tragedy, a great source of hope has been the great support and solidarity on the part of civil society. “Surprise for foreign solidarity workers in Mexico after the earthquake,” is the title of a report by Aristegui News. In this video, Ecuador’s rescue captain stationed in Mexico City points out that “there was logistics that was not programmed by the state, but the community was organized in such an incredible way that you never lacked anything. Not even energy.” Spain’s rescue captain adds that, “everyone gives up what little they have for those affected and for those who are working … and the mobilization they have had is incredible. “

There is also the possibility of donating money to different non-governmental organizations in several emergency accounts:

Mexican Red Cross

Sismo 2.pngImage @ Cruz Roja Mexicana

Caritas México

Sismo 3.pngImage @ Caritas México

To donate:

Desastre en Chiapas y Oaxaca (Cruz Roja Mexicana)

Sismo 19 de septiembre del 2017 (Cruz Roja Mexicana)

Jornada de Oración y Colecta Humanitaria 2017 (Caritas México)

For more information in Spanish:

Sorprende a brigadistas extranjeros solidaridad en México tras sismo (Video) (Aristegui Noticias, 26 de septiembre del 2017)

La semana que cambió la Ciudad de México (Desinformémonos, 25 de septiembre del 2017)

Acusan al DIF Morelos de acaparar ayuda; el gobierno de Graco dice que solo organiza la entrega (Animal Político, 22 de septiembre del 2017)

For more information from SIPAZ:

Oaxaca : ONGs denuncian “respuesta inadecuada e insuficiente de los tres niveles de gobierno” ante desastre por el sismo (19 de septiembre del 2017)

Nacional: sismo de 8,2 grados Richter. Fuertes afectaciones en Chiapas y Oaxaca (14 de septiembre del 2017)


Guerrero: Third Visit of IACHR Follow-up Mechanism Three Years after Ayotzinapa Case

September 14, 2017

Ayotzi.pngPhoto @: Sipaz

From August 28th to 30th, the third visit of the Follow-up Mechanism of the Inter-American Commission on Human Rights (IACHR) for the Ayotzinapa case was conducted to monitor compliance with the recommendations of the Interdisciplinary Group of Independent Experts (IGIE) investigation.

During his visit, the delegation of the IACHR visited the Rural School “Raúl Isidro Burgos”, where it heard the complaints of the parents, who according to Proceso magazine claim the lack of concrete progress in the case.

According to the Tlachinollan Mountain Human Rights Center of the, the Office of the Attorney General of the Republic (PGR in its Spanish acronym) informed the delegation that a team of more than 90 people were exclusively assigned to this research, and hopes that this will translate into results that bring the truth about what happened on September 26th and 27th, 2014.

The fathers and mothers summoned the Attorney General of the Republic to detain the municipal police of Huitzuco and Cocula, who could be involved in the arrest of the student teachers, before October. Otherwise, they warned, they will not return to the negotiating table scheduled for October.

The 26th of September 2017 will mark three years since the night of Iguala during which the 43 student teachers were disappeared, six others murdered and about 25 injured. Among the wounded was Aldo Gutierrez Solano, who received a bullet that destroyed 65% of his brain and he remains in a “vegetative” state. For this occasion parents of the victims announced a national march that will take place in Mexico City.

For more information in Spanish:

Claman justicia por normalistas de Ayotzinapa desaparecidos hace 35 meses (Proceso, 26 de agosto de 2017)

La CIDH lamenta que, a casi tres años, paradero de los 43 “sigue desconocido” (Proceso, 30 de agosto de 2017)

Mecanismo de seguimiento del asunto Ayotzinapa realiza tercera visita oficial a México (Centro de Derechos Humanos de la Montaña Tlachinollan, 30 de agosto de 2017)

A 3 años del caso Ayotzinapa, el gobierno sigue sin conocer el paradero de los normalistas: CIDH (Animal Político, 30 de agosto de 2017)

XXXVI ACCIÓN GLOBAL POR AYOTZINAPA Y MÉXICO (Centro de Derechos Humanos de la Montaña Tlachinollan, 01 de septiembre de 2017)

En caso Ayotzinapa “hay avances”, pero falta tener pronto noticias del paradero de los 43: CIDH   (Proceso, 4 de septiembre de 2017)

For more information from SIPAZ:

Guerrero: a 34 meses de la tragedia de Ayotzinapa familiares convocan a unas jornadas de lucha (31 de julio de 2017)

Guerrero: Sesión de seguimiento de la CIDH del caso Ayotzinapa : avances nulos (10 de julio de 2017)