National/Guerrero: Unfavorable reports about corruption and human rights in Mexico

February 5, 2016

CNDH

Luis Raúl González Pérez, CNDH president. Photo: @CuartOscuro

Two reports on human rights in Mexico coincided in that there is little progress in the areas of human rights and combatting corruption. In one report, the president of the National Commission for Human Rights (Comisión Nacional de Derechos Humanos – CNDH), Luis Raul Gonzalez Perez, declared that Guerrero is the state with most complaints, followed by Coahuila, Tamaulipas, and Veracruz. According to Aristegui Noticias news outlet, forced disappearances have risen to 26 thousand since the beginning of the “war against drugs” in 2006 to the present. During the presentation of the Commission’s (CNDH) annual report to the Permanent Commission of the General Congress, Gonzalez Perez highlighted that “the problem of disappearances challenges and questions the abilities and resources of the Mexican State to respond to a situation that, we the passage of time, we have not been able to overcome.” Likewise, he added that “the Chalchihuapan, Tlatlaya, Iguala, and Apatzingán cases had altered the general and historical perception of human rights in our country, testing its institutions.” As regards the violation of human rights, Chiapas is the sixth state with the highest frequency of reports, and Oaxaca eighth.

In another report, Human Rights Watch (HRW) noted in its 2015 annual report that “members of the Mexican security forces have participated in numerous forced disappearances. […] Since 2006, the CNDH received approximately 9,000 complaints of abuses committed by members of the army – including 1,700 during the [term of office] of the current government.” The same organization highlighted that the executive has made little progress in sanctioning members of the military implicated in cases of human rights violations as they are under the jurisdiction of military courts. Added to this, Alejandro Salas, director of Americas of International Transparency (Americas de Transparencia Internacional), noted that ‘in countries like Mexico where the police are at the service of local ‘caciques’, or at the service of mayors, of provincial governors, the police is not doing its professional and independent work, but instead responding to the interests of certain groups, often illegal groups, such as drug traffickers.”

For more information in Spanish:

Guerrero, Tamaulipas y Veracruz, los estados con más denuncias por desapariciones: CNDH (Eme Equis, 27 de enero de 2016)

Ni combate a la corrupción, ni avances en DDHH, coinciden dos reportes globales sobre México (Sin Embargo, 27 de enero de 2016)

Autoridades, incapaces de responder a casos de desaparición forzada: CNDH, en su informe 2015 (Animal Político, 27 de enero de 2016)

Escasos avances para castigar a militares violadores de derechos humanos en México: Human Rights Watch (Sididh, 28 de enero de 2016)

Impunidad enmarca desapariciones en México, denuncia Cadhac ante la ONU (Proceso, 27 de enero de 2016)

Informe anual de actividades 2015 (Comisión Nacional de los Derechos Humanos)

For more information from SIPAZ:

Guerrero: Padres y madres de Ayotzinapa van a la Corte, a 16 meses de la desaparición de sus hijos (27 de enero de 2016)

Guerrero: ONG y expertos en derechos humanos respaldan labor del GIEI en caso Ayotzinapa (25 de enero de 2016)

Guererro: Se cumplen 4 años de desaparición forzada de campesinos ecologistas de la Costa Grande (8 de diciembre de 2015)

Nacional/Internacional: Ejército y fuerzas de seguridad involucradas en asesinatos extrajudiciales, tortura, desaparición forzada: EU (10 de julio de 2015)

 


Chiapas: Public apology from the Mexican government for El Aguaje case (2000)

January 30, 2016

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@SIPAZ

On January 28, there was an act of recognition of responsibility of the Mexican State and the signing of an agreement of amicable settlement in the El Aguaje case, a community located in Rancho Nuevo, some ten kilometers from San Cristobal de Las Casas, where a child died and two more were wounded in 2000 when a grenade exploded, which had been left by members of the 31st Military Zone, which borders the community. The event took place in the auditorium of the Faculty of Law of the Autonomous University of Chiapas (UNACH) in San Cristobal.

Jose Lopez Cruz, representing his family (his children were wounded) and Cristina Reyna Cruz Lopez (mother of the deceased child), said at the event, “The authorities never recognized that we were civilians and that our case should be seen to by a civil and not a military court, as they only cared about the type of weapon that exploded but never cared for our human rights. […] The days were long, have been long, as we have sought justice during these 15 years. Up to now, we do not know who was truly guilty of causing this tragedy and even less what their punishment was.”

For their part, the Fray Bartolomé de Las Casas Center for Human Rights (CDHFBC, better known as Frayba), which took on the defense of this case and took it to the Inter-American Commission for Human Rights, pointed out that the actions of the judiciary in Mexico came “late and in partial form, mutilated, incomplete and somewhat battered.” They highlighted that no representative of the army was present at the event saying that, “Today the main character of this story is missing […] The Mexican Army is not present because it is untouchable in Mexico; it is clear to us that it is a power above civil government.”

Representing the State, Roberto Campa Cifrían, sub-secretary for the Human Rights division of the Ministry of the Interior, recognized the responsibility of the State for not having adequately taken charge of and guarded artifacts as dangerous as rifle grenades, used for practice in security institutions. He specified that the agreement that was signed during the event includes promises of transparency in the case, acts of rehabilitation, guarantees of non-repetition, and economic compensation “fair and calculated according to the highest national and international standards in this subject”, the provision of health care, productive projects, and grants among other things. He added that the clinic in the community of El Aguaje, part of the agreement, will bear the name of Angel Diaz Cruz, the child who died when the grenade exploded.

For more information in Spanish:

Boletín: La justicia en México llega tarde y mutilada: Caso El Aguaje (CDHFBC, 28 de enero de 2016)

“Nuestro caso debió ser atendido por la jurisdicción civil y no la militar”, reclamo de indígenas tsotsiles al Estado mexicano. (Pozol Colectivo, 28 de enero de 2016)

El Estado mexicano cumple reparación del daño por niño muerto y dos heridos (La Jornada, 29 de enero de 2016)

Una disculpa pública sin el agresor presente. Fuerzas Armadas son un poder superior al civil, acusan (Chiapas Paralelo, 29 de


Guerrero: Sixteen months after the disappearance of their sons, the mothers and fathers of Ayotzinapa go to the Supreme Court

January 29, 2016

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Photo @Somos el Medio

On January 26, 16 months after the disappearance of the students of Ayotzinapa Normal Rural School, their fathers and parents marched from the Angel of Independence monument to the Supreme Court of the Nation in Mexico City. During the protest, the relatives of the student teachers insisted on their demand that the Federal Judicial System behave according to law, with impartiality and independence in the case of the protections that the Iguala police have sought against the detention orders for homicide. On arrival at the Zocalo of Mexico City they encountered a heavy security presence, which prevented them from entering the public square.

Before the march, a commission of fathers and mothers of the disappeared students went to the Supreme Court and demanded a meeting with the president of the Court, Luis Maria Aguilar. The attorney for the relatives, Vidulfo Rosales, explained that his objective is that the president of the Court “conducts and manages a meeting with the Iguala courts so that they can fully inform us what proceedings are being conducted, what state the protections are in” and that “their resolutions take into account the gravity of the events.”

For more information in Spanish:

Padres de Ayotzinapa van a la Corte, a 16 meses de la desaparición de sus hijos (Animal Político, 26 de enero de 2016)

Acción por Ayotzinapa a 16 meses de la desaparición de los 43 (Sur Acapulco, 26 de enero de 2016)

Marchan a 16 meses de Ayotzinapa; les impide policía ingresar al Zócalo (Aristegui Noticias, 26 de enero de 2016)

Repudian familias de los 43 normalistas amparos a detenidos (Centro ProDH, 27 de enero de 2016)

For more information from SIPAZ:

Guerrero: ONG y expertos en derechos humanos respaldan labor del GIEI en caso Ayotzinapa (25 de enero de 2016)

Guerrero/Nacional: Tras creación de Unidad de Investigación Especializada, familiares de los 43 levantan plantón (4 de diciembre de 2015)


Chiapas: Roberto Paciencia reports lack of food and denial of visits

January 29, 2016

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Roberto Paciencia’s letter. Photo: @Kolektivo Zero

This January, Roberto Paciencia Cruz, unjustly imprisoned in San Cristobal de Las Casas, Chiapas, has reported a scarcity of food as well as denial of visits. Through his first letter he reported that the accountant of the Center for Social Reinsertion (CERESO) No. 5 “has never cared about the welfare of the prison population, we lack our blessed foods, the meals which they gave us before have been progressively reduced.” According to Paciencia’s letter, the prisoners have protested this lack to the accountant, who has promised improvements that haven’t materialized. On the same note, “He says that if we complain, it could be worse in another center, as happened to Alejandro Diaz Santiz, who was transferred to another prison for simply telling the truth.” On another note, he made it known that a commander and a guard of the prison did not allow his visitors to enter. “They didn’t take into account the time, money and the efforts of my visitors. As poor indigenous people, you totally humiliate us”, he reported. He also demanded that his case be analyzed, that the government take note of the issue of the officials named and he invites independent organizations to continue to demand freedom for persons unjustly imprisoned.  

For more information in Spanish:

Denuncia Pública de Roberto Paciencia Cruz, preso injustamente en el CERESO No 5 (Radio Zapatista, 14 de enero de 2016)

Denuncia pública de Roberto Paciencia Cruz preso injustamente, tras haber sido negada la entrada al penal a sus visitas (Red contra la Represión y la Solidaridad, 25 de enero de 2016)

For more information from SIPAZ:

Chiapas: 11 aniversario de la fundación de La Voz del Amate (13 de enero de 2015)

Chiapas: Preso de San Cristóbal, Roberto Paciencia, denuncia que le fabricaron su delito (28 de agosto de 2015)

 


Guerrero: NGOs and human rights experts support the work of IGIE in the Ayotzinapa case

January 29, 2016

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Photo: Lourdes Chávez.

Non-government organizations and experts in human rights supported the work of the of the Interdisciplinary Group of Independent Experts in the case of the 43 missing student teachers in a public communiqué on January 19, and they condemned the media and political campaign, which, they assured, attempted to undermine the legitimacy and recognition that their work has achieved. In the announcement signed by the bishop of Saltillo, Raul Vera Lopez, and the human rights experts Luis González Plascencia, Armando Guevara Ramos, Mara Hernandez, Adriana Muro and Jorge Carlos Toledo Sauri among others, they highlight that the work of the IGIE not only needs the support of civil society and the victims, but also of the highest Mexican authorities – expressed publicly.

The announcement emphasizes the sensitivity and the importance of the IGIE: “Since the start of its work on March 1, 2015, the IGIE pointed out the errors and omissions of the official investigation into the whereabouts of the students; it stressed the centrality of the victims within the process, and, by means of a devastating report presented in September 2015, offered new lines of investigation that should be followed through on. This new tool of international supervision in matters of human rights is widely recognized in Mexico and the international community; its report is considered one of the most revealing documents on the situation of human rights in Mexico in recent years. In addition, the IGIE finds itself in a decisive phase in that its mandate is extended until April 30 next so that it can continue to supervise the investigation technically.” The signatories of the announcement recalled that the Mexican State accepted the formation of the group, whose members were selected from proposals made by the petitioners and the government, in November 2014. The campaign to discredit the work of the group of experts is being carried out while the mothers and fathers of the missing students are touring the south and north of the country to demand justice in the case.

For more information in Spanish:

Nos persiguen porque incomoda el trabajo del caso Iguala: Buitrago (La Jornada, 17 de enero de 2016)

Organismos civiles, expertos y expertas en derechos humanos respaldan la labor en México del GIEI e instan al Estado a apoyar su trabajo en el caso Ayotzinapa. (Centro ProDH, 19 de enero de 2016)

ONG y expertos en derechos humanos respaldan labor del GIEI en caso Ayotzinapa (Proceso, 19 de enero de 2016)

Conforme el GIEI se acerca a la verdad, sufre una dolosa campaña de desprestigio: organizaciones (Aristegui Noticias, 19 de enero de 2016) Marcha caravana de padres de normalistas de Ayotzinapa en Oaxaca

For more information from SIPAZ:

Guerrero/Nacional: Tras creación de Unidad de Investigación Especializada, familiares de los 43 levantan plantón (4 de diciembre de 2015)


Chiapas: 18 years since the Acteal massacre

December 27, 2015

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Acteal, 22 December 2015 (@SIPAZ)

On 22 December 2015, 18 years since the massacre of 45 indigenous persons in Acteal, Chenalhó municipality, the Las Abejas Civil Society (organization to which the victims had pertained) carried out a pilgrimage and a commemoration of the events to denounce the impunity that continues to prevail in the case. In a communique, Las Abejas stressed that, “the bad government investigating the intellectual authors of this crime through the badly named ‘Supreme Court for Justice in the Nation,’ that is to say, the ‘Supreme Court for the Rich and Criminals,’ has ordered the massive release of the paramilitaries who performed the massacre. As far as we can tell, only 2 are left incarcerated, and at any moment will they also be released. Thus it remains clear to us that justice will not be granted by the government, because the Mexican State is the one that gave the order for the massacre, such that it is a criminal party and cannot rightfully be judge in the case. The Mexican justice system is expired and rotten. It is very clear that, if we wish to have true justice, we organized peoples of Mexico must construct a true, dignified, thorough, and humane justice.” Las Abejas ended the communique stressing that “Memory is an act of Justice!”

For his part, the director of the Fray Bartolomé de las Casas Center for Human Rights (CDHFBC), Pedro Faro Navarro, denounced that in the Acteal case, “there has been no justice, and the wall of impunity persists.” He added that “state officials, including Ernesto Zedillo, clearly knew what was happening in Chenalhó, in terms of the precedents and the moment at which the massacre was happening, due to reports from the Mexican Army which had been deployed in the Highlands region, thus confirming the direct participation of the Mexican State in the Acteal massacre. The national context shows us that justice will not come from above, nor from those in power or those who administer the State, let alone the existing power-groups or anyone who manipulates and corrupts [the people], who are the owners of the justice system in Mexico.” He noted that for this reason, the Las Abejas Civil Society “is building through its steadfastness another justice,” such that “one possible conclusion is that the future of the people who have been degraded and discriminated against will need no justice from the State.”

For more information (in Spanish):

La memoria es un acto de Justicia – XVIII Conmemoración de la masacre de Acteal (Sociedad Civil Las Abejas de Acteal, 22 de diciembre de 2015)

Boletín 18 aniversario de la masacre de Acteal (Centro de Derechos Humanos Fray Bartolomé de Las Casas, 22 de diciembre de 2015)

Impune, el “crimen de Estado” en Acteal: Las Abejas (La Jornada, 22 de diciembre de 2015)

Acteal: 18 años de violencia (La Jornada, 23 de diciembre de 2015)

Conmemoran 18 años de matanza de Acteal (El Universal, 23 de diciembre de 2015)

Acteal: 18 años de impunidad (Desinformemonos, 22 de diciembre de 2015)

A 18 años de la matanza de Acteal persiste la impunidad: Frayba (Proceso, 23 de diciembre de 2015)

For more information from SIPAZ (in English):

Chiapas: Las Abejas reject ‘friendly solution’ with Mexican State (25 October 2015)

Chiapas: Monthly commemoration by Las Abejas de Acteal (8 October 2015)

Chiapas: Las Abejas of Acteal denounce 6 years of release of paramilitaries (10 September 2015)

Chiapas: A member of the Las Abejas Civil Society is murdered (2 July 2015)

Chiapas: TPP pre-audience judges Mexican State for crimes against humanity (27 July 2014)

 


Chiapas: CDHFBC denounces arbitrary kidnapping and lack of due process for BAEZLN

December 27, 2015

índice

 

In a bulletin published on 18 December, the Fray Bartolomé de Las Casas Center for Human Rights (CDHFBC) reported on the arbitrary kidnapping and lack of due process during the arrest of José Alfonso Cruz Espinosa, a support-base for the Zapatista Army of National Liberation (BAEZLN). Since December 2012, the Good-Government Council “The Path of the Future” at La Garrucha (Caracol III, “Resistance for a New Dawn”), which administers the region to which Cruz Espinosa belongs, denounced the fabrication of charges against his person.

According to the CDHFBC, the BAEZLN was arrested on 10 November 2015 in Ocosingo by “police dressed in civilian clothes who did not identify themselves, specify the reason for arrest, or even show an arrest-order. They simply put him on a truck and transferred him to the command center of the specialized police in the center of the municipality.” After being incarcerated in the State Center for the Social Reinsertion of the Sentenced no. 16 El Encino (CERSS no. 16), he was transferred via helicopter the next day to the State Center for the Social Reinsertion of the Sentenced no. 14, El Amate.

The CDHFBC reported moreover that “at all times we were denied access to the detainee and our credentials as his counsel were also rejected. The State argued that he had already been transferred, which was untrue.” The CDHFBC added that “the charges placed against him are ecocide and looting due to the events that took place on 16 November 2012 […]. However, José Alfonso was not at the place of the incidents that took place that day.” The Center stressed as well that Cruz Espinoza was placed at the disposition of those judged for serious crimes, this despite the fact that none of the charges against him are serious. Bail was set for him at 136,122.96 pesos for both charges, being “an excessive amount that prevents bail from being posted,” as the CDHFBC noted. On 20 November, he was released with caution after bail was posted, such that the process in his case will continue.

For more information (in Spanish):

Boletín: Privación Arbitraria de la Libertad y violación a garantías judiciales a Base de Apoyo del EZLN. (CDHFBC, 18 de diciembre de 2015)

Denuncia el Frayba la arbitraria detención de Alfonso Cruz Espinosa (La Jornada, 19 de diciembre de 2015)

For more information from SIPAZ (in English):

Chiapas: Update regarding forced displacement of EZLN support bases belonging to the La Garrucha caracol (2 September 2014)

Chiapas: Forced displacement of EZLN support-bases belonging to La Garrucha caracol (29 August 2014)


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