Oaxaca: Truth Commission Presents its Final Report

May 23, 2016

OaxacaPhoto: @ Oaxaca Truth Commission

On May 17, the Oaxaca Truth Commission (CVO) presented its final report on the events that led to the violations of human rights against the Oaxacan people during the disturbances of 2006 and 2007. The document, titled “We already know! No more impunity in Oaxaca”, consists of 1,250 pages and is divided into four chapters dealing with complaints made by the victims, state repression, the social consequences of the violations of human rights, and getting justice and reparation of damages form the authorities, with the completion of the work started by the CVO in November 2014. The Commission reported that being an extrajudicial execution “arbitrary deprivation of life by state agents, or with the complicity, tolerance or acquiescence of these, without a judicial or legal process provided.”

Regarding the accusations against former PRI governor of Oaxaca, Ulises Ruiz (2004- 2010), Nayely Guillén, member of the CVO and human rights specialist, pointed out that the crimes of forced disappearance, torture and extrajudicial executions are crimes against humanity, so do not prescribe. “Ulises Ruiz is not saved from his crimes and is not saved from sitting in the dock. There is evidence of multiple violations of human rights committed by the former governor”, Guillen said. In this regard, Father Alejandro Solalinde, former president of the CVO, explained to Revolution 3.0, “so far the government institutions of Oaxaca have shown no sign of welcoming the report, what is more, the government of Gabino Cué has not even given signs of the existence of this document. “ The former commissioners stressed that the document is “the voice of the victims”, considering that after its presentation of the “victims should follow it up, we have already provided the tools they just need to strengthen themselves with the the report and fight for justice.”

For more information in Spanish:

Ulises Ruíz no está a salvo de sus crímenes ni de sentarse en el banquillo de los acusados: Comisión de la Verdad (Revolución 3.0, 18 de mayo de 2016)

INFORME FINAL ¡YA SABEMOS! NO MÁS IMPUNIDAD EN OAXACA (Comisión de la Verdad Oaxaca, 17 de mayo de 2016)

Denuncian ejecuciones extrajudiciales en Oaxaca, durante conflicto con APPO (Aristegui Noticias, 12 de mayo de 2016)

For more information from SIPAZ:

Oaxaca: Anuncia Comisión de la Verdad de Oaxaca pronta publicación de su informe final (3 de febrero de 2016)

Oaxaca: Más de 500 casos de tortura y 26 ejecuciones: Comisión de la Verdad (16 de junio de 2015)

Oaxaca: denuncian amenazas contra integrantes de la Comisión de la Verdad conformada para investigar el conflicto político-social del 2006 (23 de abril de 2015)

Oaxaca: A 8 años del conflicto de 2006, sigue la impunidad. Se conforma Comisión de la Verdad (27 de noviembre de 2014)


National: Judge Absolves Soldiers Involved in Tlatlaya Massacre

May 22, 2016

Tlatlaya.png

About 90 social organizations disapproved in a statement of the court decision that ordered the release of the three soldiers prosecuted for the Tlatlaya massacre, in which 22 civilians were killed in this community of the State of Mexico in June 2014. After the acquittal of charges of “aggravated homicide and concealment in the form of alteration and illegal modification of the remains,” today there is no member of the Army under arrest for the massacre.

As Process noted, the signatory organizations “considered the judicial resolution grave” after “the National Human Rights Commission (CNDH) determined that between 12 and 15 of the 22 civilians killed by military were victims of arbitrary execution”. In addition, three women survivors stated that, “although there was a confrontation, most civilians were already rendered available to the Army when their lives were taken”. However, the judge who handled the case, Adalid Ambriz Landa said he could not determine whether those responsible were the prosecuted soldiers, arguing that “stronger evidence” was required. In the statement, the organizations stressed the “ineffectiveness of the judiciary to analyze the serious human rights violations”, he noted that “the PGR had deficient action” according to Process, by failing to investigate “the General Order of Operations that instructed the military unit involved in the events to take down offenders in hours of darkness” and indicated that and relatives of victims can challenge the decision, and that “the Executive Committee for victims (CEAV), represented at the trial, should advise the relatives about the possibility of bringing the appropriate resources.” They also demanded security measures for Clara Gómez González, a survivor of the massacre and whose testimony was key to giving evidence about the events at Tlatlaya.

The statement concluded that this resolution “confirms that in Mexico justice for victims of human rights violations and abuses by the members of the military are far from being a reality, and is an indicator of the impunity that prevails in our country.”

For more information in Spanish:

Grave, resolución judicial sobre caso Tlatlaya: organizaciones de derechos humanos (Proceso, 17 de mayo de 2016)

Que “no subsista la impunidad” en caso Tlatlaya, pide la CNDH a la PGR (Aristegui Noticias, 18 de mayo de 2016)

¿Qué ocurrió en Tlatlaya minuto a minuto, según la CNDH? (Animal Político, 22 de octubre de 2014)

 For mor information from SIPAZ:

Nacional/Guerrero: Informes poco favorables sobre corrupción y derechos humanos en México (3 de febrero de 2016)

Nacional/Internacional: Ejército y fuerzas de seguridad involucradas en asesinatos extrajudiciales, tortura, desaparición forzada: EU (10 de julio de 2015)

Nacional/Internacional: Corte interamericana determina que la legislación sobre fuero militar en México sigue siendo insuficiente (21 de mayo de 2015)

Guerrero: Padres rechazan declaración de la PGR; Organizaciones expresan preocupación por descalificación de defensores Guerrerenses; HRW considera que Tlatlaya y Ayotzinapa son “crímenes de Estado” (11 de noviembre de 2014)


Guerrero/National: Judges Presume 43 Missing Students from Ayotzinapa Dead

May 22, 2016

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According to Reforma, based on a copy of the judgements issued by the Tamaulipas courts, enforced disappearance has been discarded in the case of the 43 trainee teachers from the Teacher Training School in Ayotzinapa, Guerrero (September 2014) given that the indications are that the youths were executed and not hidden by an authority: “the procedural records coincidentally point [to the fact] that the victims were not kept in concealment; on the contrary, they were detained, deprived of their liberty and transported to where they were summarily executed.”

Due to this,  overturning the arrest warrants against 56 accused, including the former mayor of Iguala, Jose Luis Abarca, his wife, members of the Iguala and Cocula municipal police, and alleged members of “Guerreros Unidos” gang, was rejected.

On another note, two of the victims have been identified, Jhosivani Guerrero de la Cruz and Alexander Mora Venancio based on analysis of the remains found in Río San Juan, in Cocula. These identifications could eventually consign those involved for the crime of homicide.

For more information in Spanish: 

Los 43 normalistas, víctimas de ejecución sumaria, concluyen jueces (Aristegui Noticias, 14 de mayo de 2016)

Sentencias de jueces descartan el delito de desaparición forzada en el caso Ayotzinapa (Animal Político, 14 de mayo de 2016)

Los 43 están muertos y no fueron ocultados por el Gobierno: Jueces (Sdp Noticias, 14 de mayo de 2016)

For more information from SIPAZ :

Guerrero/México: GIEI concluye su trabajo México entregando un segundo informe. (28 de abril de 2016)

Nacional/Internacional : PGR abre investigación contra Emilio Álvarez Icaza, Secretario Ejecutivo de la CIDH (31 de marzo de 2016)

Guerrero: Padres y madres de Ayotzinapa van a la Corte, a 16 meses de la desaparición de sus hijos (27 de enero de 2016)

Guerrero: ONG y expertos en derechos humanos respaldan labor del GIEI en caso Ayotzinapa (25 de enero de 2016)


Chiapas: Alejandro Diaz Santiz Fasts to Mark 17 Years in Prison

May 14, 2016

Alejo.pngRelatives of Alejandro Díaz Santiz and Pedro López Jiménez, Sympathizer of The Voice of Amate. Photo: @Grupo de Trabajo “No Estamos Todxs”.

On May 11, Alejandro Diaz Santiz marked 17 years deprived of his liberty. On this date the injustly imprisoned man held a day of fasting to recall that he has spent half of his life locked up. Also, relatives of the adherent to the Sixth Declaration of the Lacandon Jungle of the Zapatista Army of National Liberation (EZLN), together with members of the Sympathizers of The Voice of Amate and of the Work Group “We Are Not All Here” (“No Estamos Todxs” – GTNET) held a press conference in front of San Cristobal de Las Casas Cathedral, Chiapas. The father of Diaz Santiz declared at the event that they hope to win a legal protection in course, through which his son could be freed through partial remission of his sentence. For his part, Pedro Lopez Jimenez, Symapthizer of The Voice of Amate, added that they trust that the legal protection “has a favorable result because we have lived through many injustices, they have rejected many times, and we hope that this time they work under justce and law.” For its part, the GTNET recalled that Alejandro was jailed “for being indigenous and poor”, that he was “arbitrarily arrested, tortured, tried and sentenced without adequate legal defense”, added to which at the time of his arrest he did not speak Spanish and had no translation.

The Tsotsil indigenous is the last member of the Sympathizers of The Voice of Amate – an organization that denounces outrages, abuse of power and corruption in penitentiary centers – who is still in jail. Although the crime attributed to Diaz Santiz is not of federal jurisdiction, in September 2015, he was transferred to Villa Comaltitlan maximum security prison in Tapachula, Chiapas, as “political vengeance”, the GTNET stated. It should be remembered that the government promised to free Alejandro on a number of occasions, the last being on the signing of an agreement with the members of the Sympathizers of The Voice of Amate in February of this year. Nevertheless, his liberation has not taken place, so that last March more than 80 organizations demanded his immediate release.

For more information in Spanish:

Alejandro Diaz Santiz: 17 años de injusta privación de su libertad (Grupo de Trabajo No Estamos Todxs, 11 de mayo de 2016)

Indígena tsotsil cumple 17 años injustamente preso en Chiapas. Su caso no es aislado. (Pozol Colectivo, 11 de mayo de 2016)

A 17 años de injusto encarcelarmiento ¡Alejandro Santiz libetad! (Agencia SubVersiones, 11 de mayo de 2016)

Desde #Francia exigen ¡Libertad a #AlejandroDíazSántiz! (Koman Ilel, 28 de abril de 2016)

 For more information from SIPAZ:

Chiapas: Jornada por la liberación de Alejandro Díaz Santiz y las y los presos políticos (19 de abril de 2016)

Chiapas: Exigen la liberación de Alejandro Díaz Santiz (11 de marzo de 2016)

Chiapas: Toman acuerdo Solidarios de la Voz del Amate para liberación de presos y reparación del daño (9 de febrero de 2016)

Chiapas: Trasladan a Alejandro Díaz Sántiz, junto a 386 presos, a penal de alta seguridad (15 de septiembre de 2015)


Oaxaca: Radio broadcaster murdered in Ejutla de Crespo

May 11, 2016

Radio.pngOaxaca: Radio broadcaster murdered in Ejutla de Crespo

On April 26, Apolonio Hernandez Gonzalez, broadcaster of one of Ejutla de Crespo’s radio stations, “was murdered inside his home with a bladed weapon”, the Attorney General of Oaxaca confirmed. According to the preliminary investigation of the case, the body of the 52-year-old from Radio Need showed signs of a wound on his neck from a blade and was found dumped beside an illegal work site. The authorities do not know the motive for the murder at present, while his work colleagues have sent their condolences to his relatives and demand justice through their radio transmissions and the Internet. For its part, the Benito Juarez Association of Community Radios, as well as condemning this crime, demand clarification of the murders of two other private community radio braodcasters in recent months, Filadelfo Sanchez Sarmiento in Miahuatlán and Abel Bautista in Santiago Juxtlahuaca.

The organization Article 19 learned of the case and demanded that the state authorities examine the reporting work of Apolonio Hernandez as the main line of investigation of his murder. According to Article 19, “The Special Attorney for Attention to Crimes against Freedom of Expression (READLE in its Spanish acronym) is obliged to investigate the murders of reporters.” Nevertheless, Article 19 complained that, “it has eluded its responsibility to investigate crimes that attack freedom of expression.” Reporters Without Borders (RWB) and Amnesty International (AI) recalled that 63 journalists died due to causes related to the exercise of their profession and a further 40 were murdered while the motive of their death was unknown in 2015. Both organizations have warned that there are four “hotspots” where freedom of the press is more and more restrained, Mexico being among those. In a statement, both organizations reported that, “threats, harassment and killings continued against journalists and human rights defenders in Mexico during 2015. Despite the existence of a Protection Mechanism for Human Rights Defenders and Journalists, passed in 2012, the lack of resources and coordination meant that adequate protection is not offered.”

It should be noted that World Freedom of the Press Day, established by the United Nations Organization (UNO) was celebrated on May 3. According to Sol de Mexico, Mexican reporters have little to celebrate for this commemoration, as freedom of expression is more and more limited.

 

For more information:

México encabeza la lista de los países más peligrosos para ejercer el periodismo (El Sol de México, 4 de mayo de 2016)

Asesinan a Apolonio Hernández, locutor de radio por internet en Oaxaca (SDP Noticias, 27 de abril de 2016)

Radios comunitarias condenan asesinato de locutor de Radio Need Ejutla (27 de abril de 2016, EDUCA Oaxaca)

Asesinan a locutor de radio en Oaxaca (Zócalo Salillo, 27 de abril de 2016)

Asesinan a locutor de radio en Oaxaca (Proceso, 26 de abril de 2016)

En Oaxaca los periodistas están siendo asesinados, amenazados, hostigados y perseguidos (Revolución Tres Punto Cero, 1 de abril de 2016)

Veracruz, Guerrero y la CDMX, donde más agreden periodistas: Art. 19; es la impunidad, dice (Vanguardia, 3 de mayo de 2016)

For more information from SIPAZ:

Oaxaca: Asesinan a locutor de radio en Miahuatlán (3 de julio de 2015)

Oaxaca: Nuevas agresiones a periodistas (29 de agosto de 2014)

Oaxaca: Estado del país con mayor número de agresiones a mujeres defensoras de los derechos humanos y periodistas (29 de mayo de 2014)

Oaxaca: Denuncian ola de ataques contra periodistas y activistas (20 de julio de 2013)

Oaxaca: Article 19 condena ataque a periodistas (9 de marzo de 2012)


Guerrero/Mexico: IGIE Ends its Work in Mexico Presenting a Second Report

May 7, 2016

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On April 24, the Interdisciplinary Group of Independent Experts (IGIE), appointed by the Inter-American Commission for Human Rights (IACHR) to investigate the enforced disappearance of 43 students from the Teacher Training School at Ayotzinapa, Guerrero, in September 2014, ended its work of more than one year with the presentation of a second report. The final stage of the work the IGIE carried out occurred in the middle of a media campaign to discredit its members and work. Some weeks ago, a complaint was made against the executive secretary of the IACHR, Emilio Alvarez Icaza, for alleged fraud in detriment of the Federation for almost two million dollars given by the Federal Government for the investigation of the Ayotzinapa case.

The mothers and fathers of the disappeared believe that the group of experts “has been thrown out of the country” by the Federal Government as their work has not been concluded and the 43 have not been found. The Government for its part argues that the presence of the IGIG was agreed with a time limit, which was even extended by a second six-month period. Since its first report, the IGIE concluded that there is not sufficient scientific evidence to support the official version of the Attorney General of the Republic (PGR in its Spanish acronym) which claims that the missing student teachers were incinerated at a dump in the municipality of Cocula, Guerrero. This presumably happened at the hands of municipal police in collusion with members of organized crime.

In the second report (of over 600 pages) various inconsistencies and omissions in the file of the Attorney General of the Republic on the Ayotzinapa case were revealed. It pointed out that, “The investigation had difficulties that cannot be exclusively attributed to the complexity of the case. The slowness in responses to requests of the IGIE, the delay in the practice of evidence, the formal and not substantial responses to many concerns, the [fact that] other lines of investigation were not followed, cannot be seen as simple improvised or partial obstacles. They demonstrate structural barriers.” Among the lines of investigation which were not exhausted are the cell phones of the some of the student teachers, which continued to work hours and even days after the events, the participation of police from other localities, and the fifth bus that the students had taken and that was not being investigated. All of these lines could give more clues as to what happened.

The document also produced evidence that proved the participation of the Federal Police in the events and the responsibility at least through negligence of the 27 Battallion of the army in Iguala. It poses that at least 17 of the 61 arrested by the State and Federal authorities were tortured. Another fact that posed questions was the presence of the director of the Criminal Investigation Agency of the PGR on Sunday, October 28, 2014, at the San Juan riverbed, the day before the “official version” of the discovery of the supposed remains of some of the students in the same river and the Cocula dump was made public. The IGIE commented that, “We did not find any report about these facts, any dispatch of the 28. All the official information begins after the 29 of October.”

For more information in Spanish:

Los 10 puntos explosivos del informe #GIEIAyotzinapa (Proceso, 26 de abril de 2016)

Mostró el GIEI un sistema judicial corrupto y brutal: NYT (La Jornada, 26 de abril de 2016)

Padres reciben con tristeza informe GIEI, nos sentimos desamparados: voc. Con Ricardo Rocha (Radio Formula, 26 de abril de 2016)

Evita Osorio Chong reunirse con integrantes del GIEI; los remite con Campa Cifrián (Proceso, 26 de abril de 2016)

9 ‘huecos’ del expediente Ayotzinapa detectados en el informe final del GIEI (Expansión CNN, 25 de abril de 2016)

Remata el GIEI: evidencias manipuladas, omisiones y torturas en caso Ayotzinapa (Proceso, 24 de abril de 2016)

Confrontado con el gobierno, concluye el GIEI trabajo en México (La Jornada, 24 de abril de 2016)

For more information from SIPAZ:

Guerrero/ Nacional: EAAF y GIEI reaccionan ante conclusiones sobre fuego en el basurero de Cocula (11 de abril de 2016)

Guerrero: ONG y expertos en derechos humanos respaldan labor del GIEI en caso Ayotzinapa (25 de enero de 2016)

Nacional/Internacional : PGR abre investigación contra Emilio Álvarez Icaza, Secretario Ejecutivo de la CIDH (31 de marzo de 2016)


Chiapas/Oaxaca/Guerrero/National: Criminalization of Social Protest

April 26, 2016

Protest.pngDuring the teachers’ mobilizations in Chiapas. Photo: @Cuartoscuro

On Friday April 15, the teachers began a day of mobilizations across the country as part of a “new struggle against educational reform, for the defense of public education, and employment stability”, which began with the blockade of highways, ports and border crossings in the states of Oaxaca, Guerrero, Michoacan, and Chiapas.

Teachers from Section 22 of the National Coordinator of Education Workers (CNTE) on the Tehuantepec Isthmus led two highway blockades as part of their actions against educational reform, the education law in Oaxaca, and to demand the release of political prisoners. In Guerrero, contingents of the State Coordinator of Education Workers in Guerrero (CETEG) blocked the lanes of the Sol Mexico-Acapulco motorway from morning as well as demonstrating on a number of streets of the capital. In Michoacan, at least three thousand members of CNTE, accompanied by trainee teachers of Arteaga municipality and some social organizations took control of the entrances to the industrial zone and blocked the exit to the Morelia motorway.

In Chiapas, the “disproportionate use of the security forces, arbitrary arrests, torture, cruel, inhumane and degrading treatments which characterize repression and criminalization of social protest” were committed and documented by the Fray Bartolome de Las Casas Center for Human Rights (CDHFBC, also known as Frayba) in San Cristobal de Las Casas and Tuxtla Gutierrez during the actions of the teachers from CNTE and the National Union of Education Workers (SNTE). CDHFBC pointed out that elements of the Federal Police, the Gendarmerie, and the State Police took part and used “indiscriminately and unjustifiably tear gas and rubber bullets damaging the health of those who were protesting.” Also, they denounced that they physically injured the passersby or those who were at the site of the repression, including children, women, and seniors. In the two cities, elements of the police “arbitrarily detained and with inhumane and/or degrading treatment, without respect for personal guarantees nor mediating protocols that protect security and integrity, at least eight women teachers, ten male teachers and three passersby” who were removed to the maximum security prison at Tepic, Nayarit.

The Ministry of Public Education (SEP) made it known that it sanctioned “with discounts […] and with separation from service 13,700 teachers” who participated in the protests against educational reform in different states of the country. CDHFBC urged the Mexican State to “assume the obligation to protect, guarantee and respect human rights; cease repression and criminalization of social protest; guarantee life, integrity and personal security of those who exercise their legitimate right to free protest; immediately, effectively, seriously, thoroughly and impartially see to these events, sanctioning those responsible for the human rights violations described; and immediately release the people arbitrarily arrested and unjustifiably transferred accused of invented crimes as justification for the repressive actions.”  

For more information in Spanish:

Movilización de la CNTE contra la reforma educativa en 28 estados (La Jornada, 15 de abril de 2016)

SEP sancionará a más de 13 mil docentes por protestas (La Jornada, 15 de abril de 2016)

Policías repliegan a maestros en Chiapas (La Jornada, 15 de abril de 2016)

Boletín: La represión del Estado mexicano criminaliza la protesta social en Chiapas (CDHFBC, 16 de abril de 2016)

Tortura y represión en operativos contra SNTE en Chiapas: Frayba (La Jornada, 17 de abril de 2016)

Criminaliza el Estado a los maestros en Chiapas: Frayba (Desinformémonos, 17 de abril de 2016)

Acusan golpes y torturas contra maestros detenidos en Chiapas (Proceso, 18 de abril de 2016)

Con marchas y protestas, exigen la liberación de maestros detenidos en Chiapas (Proceso, 18 de abril de 2016)

NotiFrayba:Criminalización de la protesta social en Chiapas (CDHFBC, 18 de abril de 2016)

For more information form SIPAZ:

Chiapas/Oaxaca/Guerrero: Protestas del magisterio contra la reforma educativa en varios estados (25 de febrero de 2016)

Guerrero: Maestros en Acapulco lograron sabotear la evaluación de docentes (14 de diciembre de 2015)

Chiapas: Choques entre policía y magisterio en el bloqueo a la evaluación (21 de octubre de 2015)


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