National: Hearing of Cases of Sexual Torture in San Salvador Atenco at IACHR Court

November 29, 2017

Torture(@Ciudadanía Expres)

On November 16th and 17th, in the framework of a public hearing before the Inter-American Court of Human Rights (IACtHR Court), the eleven women survivors of sexual torture in the events of San Salvador Atenco, State of Mexico, in May 2006, shared their testimonies about what happened and the impunity that has prevailed.

It should be recalled that on May 3rd and 4th, 2006, police forces carried out an operation in San Salvador Atenco supposedly to “re-establish order.” More than 200 people were arrested during the raids. 50 of them were women, 31 of whom later reported sexual assaults by the police.

Human rights defenders requested that the I/A Court HR order the State to carry out a serious investigation to end impunity, as well as “adopt transparent policies and mechanisms to regulate the use of police force and eradicate sexual torture as an extended practice.”

Civil organizations that have accompanied the case stressed that “the eleven women of Atenco represent thousands of victims and account for the major structural problems of the State: the excessive use of police force, violence against women, torture as a mechanism of control and the impunity that allows its chronic repetition.”

The representation of the Mexican State asked the Inter-American Court of Human Rights to declare before the Court that the Inter-American Commission on Human Rights (IACHR) the IACHR committed a “serious error” in its report by not taking into account the reparation measures proposed by the State to the women who were victims of sexual violence in that operation, nor the advances that the State has implemented in terms of gender equity after the facts. However, it said that the State admits its responsibility for human rights violations committed, including sexual torture. However, although some people are still under trial, there is no public servant with a conviction for the case.

For more information in Spanish:

Mujeres de Atenco (Síntesis de medios del Centro ProDH, noviembre de 2017)

Las mujeres de Atenco, ante la CIDH: “Nos han hecho sentir, repetidamente, pequeñas” (El País, 17 de noviembre de 2017)

“Error grave” de CIDH sobre Atenco, alega el Estado mexicano, pero acepta tortura (Aristegui Noticias, 18 de noviembre de 2017)

Luchadoras de Atenco rompen el silencio (Animal Político, 24 de noviembre de 2017)

For more information from SIPAZ:

México: La CIDH exige una investigación sobre el caso de varias mujeres víctimas de abuso sexual en San Salvador Atenco en el 2006 (30 de septiembre de 2016)

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Chiapas: One Year since the Declaration of Gender Violence Alert (GVA) in Chiapas

November 27, 2017

GVA

One year after the Declaration of a Gender Violence Alert in Chiapas (November 18th, 2016), the Popular Campaign against Violence against Women and Femicide in Chiapas denounced governmental actions and omissions in a communiqué. It reported that in this period it documented “119 violent deaths that must be investigated as femicides and 46 documented femicides; while the State Prosecutor’s Office (FGE) registers 27 femicides and 35 intentional deaths, resulting in a total of 62 women murdered in Chiapas in 2017, from January to October.” For this reason, it concluded: “Everything we have documented throughout this year of the Gender Violence Alert is what allows us to characterize that in Chiapas and Mexico we have a femicidal State, since it is not only permissive but also an accomplice of violence against girls, women and elderly women and the increasing femicidal violence in our homes, streets, communities and cities of the state.”

In the main deficiencies in the implementation of the GVA, the Campaign emphasized:

“The unjustified delay of the state government institutions, specifically the Government Secretariat and the State Attorney General’s Office, to comply with agreements that would make it possible to correct or diminish institutional negligence such as the investigation procedure, the application of protocols, protection measures, translation services and professional assistance in the public service to attend, channel and eradicate frequent vices.”

“The ineffective coordination between the institutions of the three levels of the government, municipal, state and federal.”

“The absence and vacuum of authority of the state executive power.”

“The instrumentalization and the use of the resources destined to the GVA to promote the disqualified image of the governor, that simulates the attention of the causes of the structural violence in Chiapas.”

“The discrimination against women, racism and classism of Governor Velasco Coello that has been publicly evident in sexist and misogynistic advertising messages.”

– “The recurring omission and invisibilization of violence particularly suffered by immigrant and refugee women, girls and women with different abilities, indigenous people, trafficking of persons who, in Chiapas, as a border state, characterize the Gender Violence Alert and its urgent multicultural, multiethnic and generational attention.”

“The state continues to be immersed in an internal armed conflict, and this situation of war, which militarizes the state and ramps up violence and the violation of human rights with an unresolved history of serious violence against women.”

“The issue of punctual attention to women victims of violence remains unanswered, especially due to access to justice and health in cases of sexual, physical, psycho-emotional and other abuse.”

For more information in Spanish

A un año de la Declaratoria de AVG en Chiapas, ONG’S denuncian violaciones a DH por parte de gobierno contra mujeres (Revolución tres punto cero, 22 de noviembre de 2017)

Activistas de Chiapas denuncian “Estado feminicida” en México (Proceso, 21 de noviembre de 2017)

Cumple un año sin resultados, AVG para Chiapas (CIMAC Noticias, 21 de noviembre de 2017)

Comunicado completo « En Chiapas, declaramos Estado Feminicida » (Campaña Popular contra la Violencia hacia las Mujeres y el Feminicidio en Chiapas, 20 de noviembre de 2017)

 For more information from SIPAZ:

Chiapas: Las organizaciones peticionarias de la AVG en Chiapas, dejaran de asistir a las mesas de trabajo con el Gobierno del Estado por el incumplimiento de acuerdos (16 de octubre de 2017)

Chiapas: Omisiones tras la declaratoria de Alerta de Violencia de Género (9 de septiembre de 2017)

Chiapas: El Centro de Derechos de la Mujer denuncia faltas al debido proceso y al acceso a la justicia en casos de violencia contra las mujeres y feminicidios. (27 de junio de 2017)


National/International: WOLA Shows High Level of Impunity for Human Rights Violations by Soldiers in Mexico

November 13, 2017

WOLA.pngPhoto @ Desinformemonos

On November 7th, the Washington Office for Latin American Affairs (WOLA) published its new report with the title “Forgotten Justice: Impunity for human rights violations committed by soldiers in Mexico” In the same report, it denounces that “the soldiers who commit crimes and human rights violations generally do not respond for their actions, neither do the public officials who request the presence of soldiers in their states or municipalities, nor the political leaders who for decades have not committed themselves really improve the police in Mexico.”

The WOLA highlights that of the 505 cases registered between 2012 and 2016 which the PGR has investigated against members of the armed forces, mostly due to human rights violations such as torture and forced disappearance, only 16 accused have been convicted by the civil justice system. That corresponds to a 3.2% level of success in the investigations, against which La Jornada denounces the “lack of effectiveness to sanction the army”.

The report states that, “more than ten years have passed in Mexico of a strategy of security and the fight against organized crime based strongly on the deployment of the military and in the use of force, but not on justice. The strengthening of civil institutions such as the police and the Public Ministry has been left in the background. The United States also supported this approach during the first years of security assistance to Mexico, as through the Merida Initiative a significant part of the resources went to the Mexican armed forces.”

The three serious consequences in the strategy of militarized Mexican security according to the report have been:

  1. The increase in violence in Mexico and the constant violation of human rights.
  2. The decrease in urgency and pressure for police reform.
  3. That the rendering of accounts has been practically non-existent, due to impunity.

According to Proceso, the Mexican government rejected the report and published a statement in which it denies “that there is a violation of human rights.”

For more information in Spanish:

Informe de WOLA expone “impunidad” en violaciones por parte de soldados; gobierno responde (Aristegui Noticias, 8 de noviembre del 2017)

Peña rechaza informe de WOLA sobre abuso militar y pide a EU estudio sobre tráfico de armas (Proceso, 8 de noviembre del 2017)

Sólo 16 condenas en 505 investigaciones contra militares: WOLA (La Jornada, 7 de noviembre del 2017)

Justicia Olvidada: La impunidad de las violaciones a derechos humanos cometidos por soldados en México (WOLA, 7 de noviembre del 2017)

For more information from SIPAZ:

Nacional/Internacional: México ocupa el primer lugar de impunidad en América (12 de septiembre del 2017)

Guerrero: Ayotzinapa, tercera audiencia de oficio en la CIDH: “el gobierno federal no quiere resolver el caso” (26 de octubre del 2017)

Nacional/Internacional: Ejército y fuerzas de seguridad involucradas en asesinatos extrajudiciales, tortura, desaparición forzada: EU (10 de julio del 2015)


Guerrero/National: Ayotzinapa Three Years Later

October 17, 2017

Ayotzi.png

September 26th, 2017, marked three years since the extrajudicial executions of six people and the forced disappearance of 43 students from the “Raul Isidro Burgos” Normal Rural School of Ayotzinapa in Iguala, Guerrero. In this context, there was a mass and a silent march in which the fathers, mothers and companions of the student teachers participated, leaving from the Angel of Independence to the Antimonumento +43 in Mexico City. Thousands of others also marched in Chihuahua, Guerrero, Jalisco, Michoacan and Chiapas, among other states, to demand that impunity end in this case.

Abel Barrera Hernandez of La Montaña Human Rights Center greeted the parents of the 43, remembering that they have spent “three years removing the debris that the holders of the PGR piled up with hundreds of files to fabricate its historical truth. With great perversity the government broadcast on television how they shredded our children. They preferred morbidity to scientific evidence.” He also stressed that although there is evidence of the Army’s participation in the disappearance of the 43, “the authorities, instead of guaranteeing an impartial investigation, close ranks to prevent progress in this line [of investigation].”

The National Commission for Human Rights (CNDH in its Spanish acronym) demanded that the investigations into the disappearance of the 43 students should consider all aspects based on objective and scientific elements and should not be ended. Meanwhile, Amnesty International Mexico warned: “For three years, we continue to look for our disappeared among the debris of corrupt institutions and the crime of oblivion, where the real political will of the authorities has never been present. The historical lie of this case will mark Peña Nieto’s six-year term, but we, in solidarity with their fathers and mothers, will continue to count them, continue to seek them, fight to bring the truth to light and have access to justice.”

 For more information in Spanish:

Tres años de impunidad: Los 43 de Ayotzinapa (Telesur, 26 de septiembre de 2017)

Fundidos en un abrazo en medio del dolor (La Jornada, 26 de septiembre de 2017)

Padres de los 43 alistan marcha silenciosa a tres años de Ayotzinapa (Proceso, 26 de septiembre de 2017)

Víctimas del desastre: del dolor a los enfrentamientos con autoridades (Aristegui Noticias, 25 de septiembre de 2017)

Foto-reportaje de la marcha silenciosa (Regeneración Radio, 26 de septiembre de 2017)

A casi 3 años, protestan en 27 Batallón por Ayotzinapa (La Jornada, 23 de septiembre de 2017)

For more information from SIPAZ:

Guerrero: plataforma Ayotzinapa: una cartografía de la violencia (19 de septiembre de 2017)

Guerrero: tercera visita del mecanismo de seguimiento de la CIDH sobre le caso Ayotzinapa a casi tres años de los hechos (7 de septiembre)

Guerrero: a 34 meses de la tragedia de Ayotzinapa familiares convocan a unas jornadas de lucha (31 de julio de 2017)


Guerrero: Ayotzinapa Platform: Mapping the Violence

September 26, 2017

Ayotzi.png

On September 7th, almost three years after the events, Forensic Architecture published its interactive platform in which it reconstructed what happened on the night of September 26th and 27th, 2014, when students from the Normal Rural School of Ayotzinapa were attacked by police in alleged collusion with criminal organizations. That attack in Iguala left three students dead, 43 disappeared and several seriously injured and in coma.

The Prodh Center and the Argentine Forensic Anthropology Team (EAAF in its Spanish acronym) also participated in this initiative. Videos, notes and journalistic books, photographs, telephone records and the report prepared by the International Group of Independent Experts (IGIE) were taken into account to make it.

According to the Tlachinollan Mountain Human Rights Center, with this interactive platform “the case of the forced disappearance of the 43 Ayotzinapa students has been rebuilt for the first time exhaustively and comprehensively.”

 For more information in Spanish:

Plataforma Ayotzinapa: http://www.plataforma-ayotzinapa.org/

El caso Ayotzinapa: Una cartografía de la violencia (Centro de derechos humanos de la montaña Tlachinollan, 7 de septiembre de 2017)

Introducción a la Plataforma Ayotzinapa (Proceso, 7 de septiembre de 2017)

Cartografía de la violencia: muestran en 3D y video las distintas versiones del caso Ayotzinapa (Animal Político, 9 de septiembre de 2017)

Introducción a la Plataforma Ayotzinapa (Aristegui Noticias, 7 de septiembre de 2017)

 

For more information from SIPAZ:

Guerrero: tercera visita del mecanismo de seguimiento de la CIDH sobre le caso Ayotzinapa a casi tres años de los hechos (7 de septiembre)

Guerrero: a 34 meses de la tragedia de Ayotzinapa familiares convocan a unas jornadas de lucha (31 de julio de 2017)


National: Human Rights Organizations’ Reports Contradict Progress Noted in Government’s Fifth Report

September 13, 2017

HRV

What Peña’s report doesn’t say “speaks volumes” Proceso

On September 1st, the Fifth Report of the Government was presented, boasting progress on poverty, employment, education and respect for human rights.

In contrast, a few days earlier, the sixth report on human rights violations against human rights defenders was published covering the period from June 2016 to May 2017 and documenting that within that time “four human rights violations occurred every day against persons defending human rights in Mexico.” This report reports that “a year and a half after the end of the period of Enrique Peña Nieto, 2426 arbitrary arrests are documented” since the beginning of his term of office. As for extrajudicial execution, it indicates that while during the period of former president Felipe Calderon 67 were documented, “in the period we have with EPN this repressive modality has increased to almost double, totalling 123 executions.” With regard to enforced disappearance, it indicates 11 cases in the period covered by the report. “In general, the report tells us that the use of extrajudicial execution is the most repressive mode used by the State in the period covered by this report compared to previous years, (…) This clearly shows that the State increases the intensity of repression for political reasons when faced with the will of the defenders to keep up their work.”

It also denounced that “the improvement of repressive techniques includes actions such as maintaining impunity for human rights violations committed, implying that the State covers the gaps in the investigations of the most serious cases of HRV to prevent them from reaching international bodies, that is to say, it does not investigate, but only in appearance complies with what the law dictates, without this being reflected in an advance in investigations. At the same time, it accepts the visits of the international bodies of HR, but disqualifies the reports made by these international representatives. It further discredits the defense of human rights in two ways: by allowing a campaign that equates human rights defenders as defenders of criminals and, secondly, weakening the international human rights system by strengthening international humanitarian law, which judges people and not state structures, claiming that HRVs are individual acts, of subjects infiltrated or stressed, but that there has never been an order of state structures to violate human rights.”

On another note, covering the beginning of the term of Enrique Peña Nieto on July 31, 2017, the National Network of Civil Organisms for Human Rights All Rights for All (Red TDT in its Spanish acronym), made up of 84 groups from 23 states in the country, reaches similar conclusions in the report Hope is not Over. Situation of Human Rights Defenders during the Presidency of Enrique Peña Nieto, published in early September. It says that state governments are the ones that most violate human rights with 39% of cases, followed by the federal administration with 32%; municipal and community agents with 20%, and judicial officials with 18%. It also notes that 69% of the cases occurred in seven of the 30 states analyzed: Chiapas, Oaxaca, Mexico City, Guerrero, Veracruz, Puebla and the state of Mexico.

For more information in Spanish:

Desaparecieron 81 activistas y mataron a 106 este sexenio: ONG (6 de septiembre de 2017)

Informe completo « La esperanza no se agota. Situación de las personas defensoras de derechos humanos durante la presidencia de Enrique Peña Nieto » (Red Tdt, septiembre de 2017)

Boletín de prensa e informe completo – Sexto informe de violaciones de derechos humanos contra personas defensoras de los derechos humanos. “Defender los derechos humanos en México: La ejecución extrajudicial como respuesta del Estado. Junio de 2016 a mayo de 2017” (29 de agosto de 2017)

Lo que no dice el Informe de Peña “cuenta, y cuenta mucho (Proceso, 1ero de septiembre de 2017)

¿Qué dice el V Informe de Peña? Estos son los 5 ejes del texto (documento completo) (Animal Político, 1ero de septiembre de 2017)

Peña Nieto en su 5to Informe de Gobierno, ¿mentiras o verdades? (Animal Político, 4 de septiembre de 2017)

Los cinco ejes del informe de Gobierno de EPN (Sdp Noticias, 4 de septiembre de 2017)

For more information from SIPAZ :

Nacional : cuarto informe del gobierno de Peña Nieto(12 de septiembre de 2016)

Nacional: Múltiples críticas a la presentación del Tercer Informe de Gobierno de Peña Nieto (8 de septiembre de 2015)

 


Mexico: Announcements and Actions for International Day of the Victims of Forced Disappearances

September 7, 2017

Forced disappearance.png(@ONU-DH)

On August 30th, International Day of Victims of Forced Disappearances, hundreds of family members and friends of missing persons marched in Coahuila, Chihuahua, Nuevo Leon and Baja California to demand that the authorities make progress in the search for their loved ones and punish those responsible for this crime.

In this same context, the Office of the UN High Commissioner for Human Rights (UN-HR) in Mexico urged the Mexican State to recognize the competence of the United Nations Committee to oversee the Convention that deals with this issue to receive and to examine individual complaints of victims of enforced disappearances. Jan Jarab, UN-HR representative in Mexico reported that “despite the fact that eight years have passed since it ratified the International Convention for the Protection of Persons against this scourge, there are currently more than 30,000 disappeared in Mexico.” In this context, UN-HR reiterated its demand to the Chamber of Deputies to approve the general law on forced disappearance.

For the same reason, Amnesty International launched the campaign “Nothing is the same if someone disappears”, with an emphasis on the situation in Syria, Mexico and Spain. In the case of Mexico, the organization emphasized: “As of June 2017, according to the Government, 32,096 people were missing, without specifying how many had been forced to disappear. An emblematic case is the 43 students of Ayotzinapa who disappeared in September 2014. In April 2016, the Interdisciplinary Group of Independent Experts, appointed by the Inter-American Commission on Human Rights, accused the Mexican Government of not following the key research lines, manipulating evidence, protecting officers suspected of participating in enforced disappearances, and torturing suspects to secure “confessions.” It has recently been verified that members of this group and of human rights organizations working on the case have been spied on with sophisticated programs available only to governments.”

On its part, the National Commission for Human Rights (CNDH in its Spanish acronym) affirmed on the same occasion that disappearances still occur in Mexico and urged the Chamber of Deputies to approve the General Law on the subject at the next sitting.

The Fray Bartolome de Las Casas Center for Human Rights (CDHFBC in its Spanish acronym) issued a bulletin in which it denounced that “forced disappearance is part of the strategy used by the Mexican State to infuse terror in society and annihilate organizational experiences” and recalled that in Chiapas, “cases of forced disappearance, in the context of the Internal Armed Conflict, as a consequence of the implementation of the Chiapas Campaign Plan 94, committed by state agents and paramilitary groups that operated with the support, tolerance and acquiescence of the Mexican State, remain unpunished, creating conditions for their repetition.”

 For more information in Spanish:

« Amnistía Internacional lanza la campaña: Nada es igual si alguien desaparece » (Amnistía Internacional, 29 de agosto de 2017)

México: ONU-DH lanza campaña a favor de los derechos de las personas desaparecidas (ONU-DH, 30 de agosto de 2017)

Llama la ONU a México a reforzar la lucha contra desapariciones (La Jornada, 30 de agosto de 2017)

Desapariciones subsisten en México como consecuencia de la impunidad: CNDH (Proceso, 30 de agosto de 2017)

Urge en México una Ley General sobre Desaparición (CDHFBC, 30 de agosto de 2017)

Desapariciones forzadas en México, “crimen de Estado” (La Jornada, 31 de agosto de 2017)

For more information from SIPAZ :

Guerrero: Foro sobre desaparición forzada (22 de agosto de 2017)

Nacional: Amnistía Internacional presenta su informe anual sobre la situación de derechos humanos en el mundo. México, “en una de las peores crisis de derechos humanos y justicia” (3 de marzo de 2017)

Nacional : cierre de año legislativo con agenda polémica en el Congreso (8 de diciembre de 2016)