Mexico: Final results of the 2015 midterm elections

June 25, 2015

(@Portico online)

(@Portico online)

On Sunday, June 7, 2015, more than 83 million Mexicans voted for 1,996 public offices, including 9 governorships, 500 federal deputies, and hundreds of local offices in different states of the Republic.

A week after the elections, upon finalizing the calculation of votes, the National Electoral Institute (INE) reported that the deputies chosen by direct votes and proportional representation within the Chamber of Deputies would include 203 seats for the PRI (which will retain the majority vote), 108 for the PAN, 56 for PRD, 47 for the Green Ecologist Party (PVEM), 35 for MORENA, 26 for the Citizens’ Movement, 8 for Social Encounter, 10 for New Alliance (PANAL), and 6 for the Labor Party (PT). 41% of the offices will be held by women.

The election registered a participation of 47.72% of eligible voters, while the percentage of blank votes reached 4.76% of the total.

For more information (in Spanish):

¿Cuántos legisladores tendrá cada partido en la Cámara de Diputados? (Animal Político, 14 de junio de 2015)

INE confirma resultados para diputados federales; PRI obtuvo más de 11 milliones de votos (Sdp Noticias, 14 de junio de 2015)

PRI será mayoría en San Lazaro; finaliza el conteo (El Universal, 14 de junio de 2015)

Ganadores de las elecciones del 7 de junio del 2015 (El Economista, 15 de junio de 2015)

For more information from SIPAZ (in English):

Guerrero: PRI wins elections within violent context (25 June 2015)

Chiapas: abstentionism and blank votes “win” in midterm elections (25 June 2015)

Oaxaca: Violent election day: 440 incidents, 92 arrests, injured, disappeared, and one killed (25 June 2015)

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Oaxaca: Violent election day: 440 incidents, 92 arrests, injured, disappeared, and one killed

June 25, 2015

Foto @ Educa

Photo @ Educa

Election day on 7 June in Oaxaca ended with 440 incidents, 92 arrests, injured, disappeared, and one killed. 283 electoral booths were burned down, 26 robbed, 56 left uninstalled, and 75 suspended operations. Given these conditions, close to 300,000 votes were nullified.

The murder of José Alfredo Jiménez Cruz, brother to the former PRI mayor of San Miguel Chimalapa, in the Tehuantepec Isthmus was confirmed. He died after being shot outside an electoral booth. The Communal General Assembly of Álvaro Obregón denounced another shooting incident, while the General Assembly of Juchitán de Zaragoza denounced the invasion of an armed group that open fired, leaving six injured, three of them gravely. In Tuxtepec, relatives of the teacher Sandra Dianelle Herrera Castro, a union leader, denounced her forcible disappearance at the hands of the Secretary for National Defense (SEDENA). She is not listed in the official registry of the arrested.

Furthermore, during the early morning of 6 June, federal security forces displaced teachers’ occupations in the cities of Huajuapan de León, Tlaxiaco, Pinotepa Nacional, Tuxtepec, and Salina Cruz. Previously, the deployment of federal forces in the states of Chiapas, Guerrero, Michoacán, and Oaxaca had been announced, “to guarantee the citizens’ right to vote,” amidst the possibility of violent acts. Official reports indicated the arrival of 600 soldiers to Oaxaca. For this reason, 56 civil-society organizations called on the international community, given that “the violence seen in the electoral process, including 21 political assassinations during the campaigns, is worse than prior elections at the national level, being the product of impunity, corruption, violence, and collusion with organized crime, both on the part of the political parties and the three levels of government.” In another public communique, civil-society organizations from Oaxaca denounced the “climate of terror imposed by the Mexican State by means of the Army, the Federal Police, the Gendarmerie, and the Navy.” Lastly, some 24 electoral advisors from Oaxaca demanded that the president of the National Electoral Institute, Lorenzo Córdova Vianello, postpone the elections due to the “military siege,” and as long as political and economic conditions do not improve.

For more information (in Spanish):

Comunicado de Prensa de OSC de Oaxaca (Consorcio para el Diálogo y la Equidad de Género de Oaxaca, 6 de junio de 2015)

56 OSC hacen un llamamiento a la comunidad Internacional desde Oaxaca (Servicios para una Educación Alternativa, 7 de junio de 2015)

Un muerto y 440 incidentes enmarcaron elección en Oaxaca (Proceso, 7 de junio de 2015)

El diálogo fracasó, no puede haber elección en Oaxaca con cerco militar: Consejeros (Sin embargo, 6 de junio de 2015)

México: Atacan a balazos a la comunidad Gui´xhi´ro´- Álvaro Obregón, Juchitán, Oaxaca (Kaos en la Red, 7 de junio de 2015)

Desaparecen a lideresa magisterial (Noticias Net, 8 de junio de 2015)

Maestros y activistas sabotean comicios en Oaxaca; 88 detenidos por quemar urnas (La Jornada, 8 de junio de 2015)


Chiapas: abstentionism and blank votes “win” in midterm elections

June 25, 2015

Elecciones intermedias 2015, San Cristóbal de Las Casas, Chiapas (@SIPAZ)

Midterm elections 2015 San Cristóbal de Las Casas, Chiapas (@SIPAZ)

On June 7, together with the rest of the country, federal congressional elections took place in Chiapas. The environment in the days running up to the elections was marked by tensions resulting from the violent protests that members of the National Coordination of Educational Workers (CNTE) had been carrying out since the beginning of June in the capital city of Tuxtla Gutiérrez, together with its announcement of their boycott of the elections. To guarantee that elections be held, the Secretary of Governance announced on June 6 the deployment of federal forces in Chiapas, Oaxaca, Guerrero, and Michoacán. In the specific case of Chiapas, reports indicated at least 18,000 soldiers and federal police arrived.

At the end of the day, the General Secretary for Governance, Juan Carlos Gómez Aranda, stressed that the elections had taken place under normal conditions in Chiapas, though he recognizes that some “incidents” had been seen, though according to him, these neither threatened the elections nor the social stability of the state.

Within these “incidents,” not all the voting booths could be installed, and 35 ballots and electoral documents were burned in Ocosingo, Chilón, Venustiano Carranza, Comitán, Salto de Agua, Chiapa de Corzo, Huehuetán, and Tuxtla. The CNTE has distanced itself from these actions.

92% of the reporting results suggested the following outcomes: 46.5% of the eligible population abstained, while 5.8% submitted blank votes. This implies that at least half declared themselves for one candidate or another.

The rest of the voting gave a clear victory to the alliance between the Institutional Revolutionary Party (PRI) and the Green Ecologist Party of Mexico (PVEM), whose candidates triumphed in the 12 districts comprising the state, obtaining 69.4% of the voters. In net terms, the PVEM consolidated itself as the primary political force, after it received 45.6% of the votes. MORENA took third place, with approximately 6% in favor.

It should be recalled that, in the case of Chiapas, there will be new elections on July 19 for local congressional positions (24 legislators by majority vote and 17 by proportion) and 122 mayorships.

For more information (in Spanish):

La coalición PRI-Partido Verde arrasa en las elecciones de Chiapas (CNN México, 8 de junio de 2015)

Gana el abstencionismo en Chiapas (Chiapas Paralelo, 8 de junio de 2015)

Detienen a campesinos en Chiapas por quema de material electoral (Proceso, 7 de junio de 2015)

Con tranquilidad concluye jornada electoral en Chiapas (Excelsior, 7 de junio de 2015)

For more information from SIPAZ (in English):

Chiapas/National: Occupation of gas stations and burning of electoral offices during CNTE protests in Tuxtla Gutiérrez (10 June 2015)


Chiapas: Violence in Teopisca to force women to attend a PRI rally

June 10, 2015

Pinta:

Graffiti: “Votes are gained, not bought,” Teopisca (@Chiapas Paralelo)

On 27 May, women who benefit from the Próspera governmental welfare program occupied the Teopisca City Hall to protest the Institutional Revolutionary Party (PRI) and its mayoral candidate, as they had been forced to attend a rally from this party, planned for 10am the next day. They were threatened with having their support withdrawn if they did not attend the action, they denounced.

In retaliation, women painted graffiti against the PRI mayoral candidate, Raúl López; they also punctured the PRI bus’ tires and broke its windows. They demand the resignation of the Próspera municipal coordinator, and that the SEDESOL officials suspend political conditions for participation in the program.

In light of these acts, the Chiapas Center for Women’s Right A.C. (CDMCH) denounced “the violence that women face if they receive welfare programs from the political parties and officials of public policy, in exchange for votes, forcing them to join whatever political party to ensure the flow of support.” The CDMCH denounced that the women had been threatened with “having their programs withdrawn if they do not join the party, [which] takes advantage of their impoverished state, amidst the fact that there is no comprehensive attention granted by the State in terms of education, health, housing, and just work.”

The CDMCH has demanded a halt to violence against women, as well as the use of poverty for political ends, being “consequences of the impunity and social backwardness in which thousands of us women and our families live in Chiapas, in terms of the exercise of the right to free and informed voting on 7 June.”

For more information (in Spanish):

Beneficiarias de Prospera en Teopisca desocupan alcaldía tras cese de funcionaria, La Jornada, 30 de mayo de 2015

Protestas en Teopisca por uso electoral de programa social, La Jornada, 29 de mayo de 2015

Comunicado del cdmch ante los hechos violentos een el municipio de Teopisca por motivos electorales, CDMCH, 29 de mayo de 2015

Mujeres denuncian que el PRI les condiciona la entrega de PROSPERA en Teopisca, Chiapasparalelo, 28 de mayo de 2015


Chiapas: Las Abejas announce that they will not vote in the mid-term elections

June 9, 2015

Acteal (@Sociedad Civil Las Abejas)

Acteal (@Sociedad Civil Las Abejas)

On 22 May, in observance of the monthly commemoration of the Acteal massacre (1997) in which 45 people were murdered, the Las Abejas Civil Society published a new communique presenting its take on the present electoral context.

Las Abejas affirmed that “the people who we represent will not vote in the elections,” given that the “so-called vote” is a “farce that offers political leadership of the people, but we know that there above they know well and already have arranged who and which parties will win in the elections to come.”

Instead, they recommend “the exercise of our rights as citizens not to participate in elections, but rather in the decision-making processes we carry out in our communities, in the daily resistance we embody, in the construction of autonomy, and in our collaboration with different spaces and processes to denounce injustice and human-rights violations committed by the State against our people. In exchange for not participating in the elections, we have begun a process of building an ethical and responsible government that actually represents us and listens to our voice: one that defends our lives, lands, and territories.”

For more information (in Spanish):

Comunicado completo (Sociedad Civil Las Abejas, 22 de mayo de 2015)

Las Abejas” de Acteal informaron que no participarán en elecciones 2015(Chiapas Paralelo, 24 de mayo de 2015)

For more information from SIPAZ (in English):

Chiapas: Civil Society Las Abejas denounce human rights violations in the country and show solidarity with various processes (24 April 2015)

Chiapas: Las Abejas de Acteal reject dams and high electricity prices, affirming “Free Rivers and Free People” instead  (April 10, 2015)

Chiapas: Las Abejas Civil Society expresses solidarity with the relatives and comrades of the disappeared students from Ayotzinapa, Guerrero (February 5, 2015)


Guerrero: Valentina Rosendo renounces MORENA candidacy after attack

June 9, 2015

Valentina Rosendo Cantú (@Amnesty International)

Valentina Rosendo Cantú (@Amnesty International)

Valentina Rosendo Cantú has renounced her candidacy for the National Regeneration Movement (MORENA, led by Andrés Manuel López Obrador) for the mayorship of Acatepec, after she received death-threats and suffered a motor-vehicle accident that she qualified as an attack on her person. On 10 May, she was followed on the highway that leads to Tlapa de Comomfort, and for this reason had an accident. Pablo Amílcar Sandoval Ballesteros, the MORENA candidate for Guerrero state, reported the decision.

It should be recalled that Valentina Rosendo Cantú is an indigenous woman who was raped in 2000 by Army soldiers in the Ayutla de los Libres municipalities. In 2010, the Inter-American Court on Human Rights sentenced the Mexican State in the case, and demanded compensation for damages, and ordered an adequate investigation and punishment for those responsible, among other dictates.

For more information (in Spanish):

Atentan contra Valentina Rosendo y renuncia a candidatura de Morena en Guerrero (Proceso, 20 de mayo de 2015)

Una candidata de Morena en Guerrero deja la contienda por seguridad (CNN México, 20 de mayo de 2015)

La mujer a la que el gobierno de México pidió perdón renuncia a su candidatura en Guerrero (Animal Político, 20 de mayo de 2015)

Candidata de Morena a edil renuncia por temor (EL Universal, 20 de mayo de 2015)

From more information from SIPAZ:

Guerrero: SCJN decision in the case of Inés Fernández and Valentina Rosendo “far from the heights” of the Court’s decision on the Radilla case (2010) (17 May 2015)

Guerrero: Murders and death-threats against candidates for June elections (17 May 2015)


Oaxaca: Protests outside the Fepade due to lack of ballots in special booths

July 10, 2012

1 July, Oaxaca @ Noticiasnet.mx

On the afternoon of 1 July, some 40 people protested after the closing of the electoral booths in front of the headquarters of the local Council of the Federal Electoral Institute (IFE) in Oaxaca de Juárez to demand that they be given electoral forms so that they could vote, given that they could not do so in the special booths due to lack of forms.  Units from the federal and preventive state police deployed in the streets donning anti-riot gear to protect the electoral institute from possible acts of violence.

Led by Roberto Chagoya and Lucio López Hernández, the citizens who demanded their right to vote in special booths, due to the fact that they do not reside in the capital city, called for ballots “so that we can have the right to vote.”  López Hernández handed in a written form in which he details that around 12pm on the day of the elections, they went to the module of the Special Prosecutorial Office for Attention to Electoral Crimes (FEPADE) located in the zócalo of the capital to denounce that there were not enough ballots.  Instead of receiving them, however, the FEPADE officials called the police.  The protestors also demanded the presence of councilors to hand over to them a document with 500,000 signatures “so that they give us ballots to vote.”  López Hernández said that “we do not want to hurt anyone; we only want electoral forms, as there are none in the booths.”  In Oaxaca, 7 of the 47 special booths installed were set up in the capital city.  Each one had 750 ballots and 14 other forms for representatives of political parties.

Marina Méndez, from Ocotlán de Morelos, assured that in the special booths that is installed in the Defense Institute for the Human Rights of the People of Oaxaca (DDHPO) she was also told that the ballots had run out.

Other citizens reported to the Noticias newspaper that they took the decision to write a number on their forearm in light of the disorganization of those in charge of the booths, as they did not know the extent to which the ballots were limited.

In contrast to these accounts, the State Attorney General’s Office reported that none of the Regional Subprocurations nor the State Prosecutorail Office for Attention to Electoral Crimes, which is affiliated with the IFE, had received notice as of 8pm on 1 July of denunciations or incidences related with the electoral process.

For more information (in Spanish):

Las Casillas Especiales, las de mayor problema; insuficientes las boletas (Página3.mx, 1 de julio de 2012)

Casillas especiales, dolor de cabeza (Noticiasnet.mx, 1 de julio de 2012)

Enardece a ciudadanos falta de boletas en casillas especiales(Noticiasnet.mx, 1 de julio de 2012)