Chiapas: new threats against the priest and members of the Believing People in Simojovel

July 2, 2015

Padre Marcelo Pérez Pérez (@Red TdT)

Father Marcelo Pérez Pérez (@Red TdT)

In a communique published on 22 June, members of the parish of San Antonio de Padúa, Simojovel municipality, denounced that, since 16 June, death-threats have been on the rise against Father Marcelo Pérez, catechists, and members of the Parish Council and Believing People, thus putting at risk their lives and physical and psychological integrity. This increase has presented itself following the arrest of Juan Gómez Domínguez, a former PRI mayor, and two of his accomplices, given that “the PRI leaders from different communities hold the Believing People and Pérez Pérez responsible for these arrests, such that now we have entered a high-risk situation.”

Within these new aggressions, the Simojovel Catholics detail that on 16 June, PRI militants “met at the offices of the National Campesino Confederation, several of them carrying machetes, sticks, and gasoline amphoras. Even at night, they went to buy more gasoline, and during the day it was heard that they would attack the church and remove the priest forcibly to kill him.” Beyond this, on 20 June, “a parish council that has been awarded precautionary measures by the Inter-American Commission on Human Rights (IACHR) received strong threats against its person and family, leading them to decide to leave and seek out refuge in another municipality for some days.” Two days later, 10 people “strongly armed harassed the CIRSA offices, being a cooperative created by the Catholic Church, whose board members work in the Church, yet no valuable objects were stolen.” That same day in Bochil, close to Simojovel, four people in a parked car were overheard saying, “We are going to decapitate Father Marcelo from Simojovel. We are just finding the right time to do so, given all the fucked-up things he does.”

It should be recalled that for the past year, the Catholics from Simojovel have through pilgrimages demanded the closure of cantinas and sex-houses, and that the sale of drugs and arms in the zone be curtailed. The result is the death-threats they now confront.

For more information (in Spanish):

Pronunciamiento completo: Situación de riesgo contra defensores comunitarios del Pueblo Creyente en Simojovel (Pueblo Creyente de Simojovel,

Por denunciar la corrupción y la venta de drogas, grupos priistas amenazan de muerte al sacerdote y habitantes de Simojovel, Chiapas(Desinformémonos, 25 de junio de 2015)

Prevalece en Simojovel “situación de alto riesgo” por detención de ex alcalde(La Jornada, 25 de junio de 2015)

For more information from SIPAZ (in English):

Chiapas: OMCT and FIDH urge protection of Simojovel priest (23 April 2015)

Chiapas: New threats against members of the Believing People in Simojovel after their fifth pilgrimage demanding security and peace (12 November 2014)

Chiapas: Urgent Action concerning threats to Marcelo Pérez, priest of Simojovel (28 June 2014)


Chiapas/National: 26 June, International Day of Support for Torture Victims

July 2, 2015

IMAGEN_STOP_TORTURA_PARA_COMPARTIR_EN_RRSS

(@Amnesty International)

On 26 June was celebrated the International Day of Support for Torture Victims, which this year was focused on the right to rehabilitation. The declarations and denunciations regarding torture have not ceased after the visit to Mexico by the UN Special Rapporteur on Torture, who in his report stressed that “torture and abuses of the incarcerated on the part of the authorities in Mexico are generalized.” Many cases are not denounced due to fear of revenge, and principally they are the committed by municipal, state, and federal police, as well as ministerial agents and the military. “Torture and abuse take place during the first 24 to 48 hours of the arrest, and generally they end after the person is arraigned: the methods that are used include threats, insults, destruction of belongings, as well as beatings (usually involving hard objects), electrocution, water-boarding, violence, and sexual abuse.” Beyond this, he added that the disparity between the number of denunciations and testimonies received and the number of condemnations is a “worrying sign of impunity.” The Rapporteur declared he had been pressured to keep his report short, leading in turn to the accusation that the report was based on a small number of cases.

On the one hand, the National Commission on Human Rights (IACHR) in Mexico communicated that from 2001 to May 2015 it received 10,688 complaints regarding torture and other abuses (on average 2 a day). It affirms that in just over two years of the administration of Enrique Peña Nieto, it has received 2,119 denunciations, with the military being the most frequently accused force. It also poinst to the fact that the country has lacked a national registry to reflect the totality of the cases of torture and other abuses. The results it has available have been compiled by the CNDH, state human-rights commissions, and the denunciations that have been brought together.

Beyond this, the Inter-American Commission on Human Rights (IACHR) declared that despite the fact that thirty years have passed since the Inter-American Convention to Prevent and Sanction Torture, this practice persists in the region. Several commissions have expressed their concerns regarding the use of rape as a method of torture against women, the attempt to justify such actions with arguments based on threats to national security or the need to obtain information in investigations, or to prevent attacks. In this way, the IACHR has called on members of the Organization of American States (OAS) to investigate all denunciations of torture and other cruel, inhuman, and degrading treatment.

Amnesty International also pronounced itself on the question, reporting that 64% of Mexicans fear being subjected to torture after arrest; this places Mexico as the second-highest country with this fear on the global scale. Beyond this, AI adds that 7,000 denunciations of torture have been made in the past 3 years, but only 7 cases sanctioned at the federal level. AI is organizing a graphical campaign against torture.

In observance of the day, a number of denunciations appeared in the media, including the charge that 40% of those arrested for the Ayotzinapa case have been subjected to torture and other abuses during their arrest, or the hunger strike undertaken by eight prisoners from different institutions in Mexico City to demand the cessation of prison abuse. In Chiapas, the Fray Bartolomé de las Casas Center for Human Rights (CDHFBC) denounced the torture of a Tzotzil couple as a means of forcing them to incriminate themselves in a murder case. The CDHFBC also organized a projection and conversation regarding torture in San Cristóbal de Las Casas, where two experts on the question were present together with Silvia Domínguez, who gave testimony on the case of her brother Gabriel Domínguez, who died in police custody.

For more information (in Spanish):

La tortura y los malos tratos son generalizados en México, dice la ONU(CNN México, 9 de marzo de 2015)

Recibí presiones para minimizar mi informe sobre tortura’’: Méndez (La Jornada, 2 de abril de 2015)

En 14 años, 10 mil 688 quejas por tortura y otros tratos crueles(ContraLínea, 28 de junio de 2015)

Se deben indagar de oficio todas las denuncias de tortura: CIDH (CIMAC Noticias, 26 de junio de 2015)

Comienzan ocho reclusos huelga de hambre indefinida para denunciar tortura y extorsión (La Jornada, 29 de junio de 2015)

Torturados, la mitad de los procesados por caso Ayotzinapa: expertos del GIEGI (Proceso, 29 de junio de 2015)

Torturan a pareja tzotzil para que se inculpe de crimen, acusa el Frayba(Proceso, 29 de junio de 2015)

Cambiemos la historia #ALTOTORTURA (Amnistía Internacional)

For more information from SIPAZ (in English):

Oaxaca: More than 500 cases of torture and 26 executions: Truth Commission (29 June 2015)

National: New Amnesty International report, “Out of Control: Torture and Other Abuses in Mexico” (15 September 2014)

Chiapas: Presentation of the Special Report: “Torture, mechanism of terror” (3 July 2014)

National: UN Special Rapporteur on torture ends official visit to Mexico (16 May 2014)


Guerrero: On hunger strike, Nestora Salgado continues to hope for transfer as her health declines

June 9, 2015

Nestora Salgado (@socialism.com)

Nestora Salgado (@socialism.com)

Zaira Rodríguez, daughter of Nestora Salgado García, the coordinator of the Communal Police in Olinalá who has been on hunger-strike in the maximum-security prison of Tepic, Nayarit, since 5 May, denounced that her mother is taken to the dining room with the rest of the prisoners at mealtimes as a form of psychological torture. She denounced that the director of the prison falsified a medical report claiming that her mother had been seen by a doctor.

Since 18 May, members of the federal and state governments of Guerrero, as well of Mexico City, agreed to transfer the political prisoner from the federal prison in Nayarit to a facility ruled by common law. This change is due to the precautionary measures awarded to Nestora Salgado by the Inter-American Commission on Human Rights (IACHR), as well as to a formal petition from the National Commission Human Rights (CNDH). Regardless, this transfer had been expected in any case.

In parallel terms, on 20 May, Eladio Ávila Pérez, the in-law of Salgado, was murdered in the Tomatlán municipality of Jalisco. Differnet media sources attributed the murder to death-threats that the victim had received due to his activism in favor of Nestora’s release. José Luis Ávila Báez, her husband, noted regardless that “to date my family has seen no evidence that the homicide has to do with the activism in search of the release of my wife Nestora Salgado, or that the Jalisco cartel or any other criminal group are affiliated or responsible for the crime. The causes of my father’s murder are to be determined by the Jalisco State Attorney General, who must investigate and punish the person(s) who perpetrated the act. For this reason, I request that an expeditious and effective investigation be carried out, so that my father’s murder not remain in impunity.”

On 25 May, 20 days after beginning her hunger strike, Nestora Salgado decided to suspend her consumption of liquids to demand that the State Prosecutor Miguel Ángel Godínez Muñoz agree to meet with her lawyer to review the case. News of a possible transfer are presently hoped for.

For more information (in Spanish):

Lleva Nestora 20 días en ayuno; se espera su traslado al DF, que se acordó hace una semana (El Sur 25 de mayo de 2015)

Deja Nestora de tomar líquidos en demanda de su libertad; cumple 19 días en huelga de hambre (El Sur 24 de mayo de 2015)

Asesinan en Jalisco al suegro de Nestora; la familia no tiene evidencias de que sea por el activismo, declaran (El Sur, 22 de mayo de 2015)

Comunicado completo de José Luis Ávila Baéz (Los AngelesPress, 21 de mayo de 2015)

Trasladarán a Nestora Salgado a un centro de reclusión del fuero común (La Jornada, 19 de mayo de 2015)

Cumple Nestora 15 días en ayuno; Segob retrasa su traslado a Tepepan (Proceso, 19 de mayo de 2015)

Por protestar, empeora la situación de Nestora Salgado en la cárcel (La Jornada, 18 de mayo de 2015)

Torturan a Nestora, que cumple 13 días en huelga de hambre; la llevan a donde comen otras presas (El Sur, 18 de mayo de 2015)

Op-eds (in Spanish):

Nestora Salgado, por Elena Poniatowska (La Jornada, 17 de mayo de 2015)

La comandanta Nestora, por Luis Hernández Navarro (La Jornada, 19 de mayo de 2015)

Nestora: rehén del Estado mexicano, por Magdalena Gómez (La Jornada, 19 de mayo de 2015)

Nestora, mujer de linaloe, por el CDH Tlachinollan (El Sur, 19 de mayo de 2015)

Firma la Acción Urgente: La vida e integridad de Nestora Salgado García Coordinadora de la Policía Comunitaria del Municipio de Olinalá está en grave riesgo (RedTdt)

For more information from SIPAZ (in English):

Guerrero: political prisoner Nestora Salgado, coordinator of the Communal Police of Olinalá, begins hunger strike (16 May 2015)

Guerrero: IACHR calls on Mexican government to guarantee medical attention to Nestora Salgado (8 February 2015)

Guerrero: Delay in release for Nestora Salgado; her daughter claims to have been threatened by phone (5 February 2015)

Guerrero: Death-threat directed against Nestora Salgado’s daughter and Communal Police commander from Olinalá (25 October 2014)

Guerrero: A year after Nestora Salgado’s arrest, organizations demand her immediate release (2 September 2014)


National/International: Inter-American Court resolves that Mexican law on military tribunals remains inadequate

June 9, 2015

On 13 and 14 May, the Inter-American Court on Human Rights (IACHR) published two resolutions regarding the observance of four sentences the Court had handed down against the Mexican State (2009 and 2010), in cases related to abuses committed by Army soldiers (including forcible disappearance, torture, and sexual violence). The Court concludes that exist legislation on military tribunals continues without having standardized with international legal expectations.

The Court indicates that the limitations of existing law were demonstrated clearly by the Tlatlaya massacre in Mexico State: “In this case, if it is that the extrajudicial executions continue to be judged in civil courts, the cause will remain fragmented, as the Secretary for National Defense (SEDENA) has retained the military tribunal as appropriate for the judgment of certain crimes committed by soldiers, thus opening the possibility that the evidence be diverted, and that parallel cases may run, coming to different conclusions.” It determined for this reason that “military jurisdiction is not competent for the investigation, judgment, and punishment of those who violate human rights, particularly when either the perpetrator or victim is a soldier.”

For their part, civil legal organizations have requested that the debate on the Military Justice Code be opened during the next congressional session. They have stressed that “both the Committee against Forcible Disappearances and the United Nations Rapporteur on Torture and Other Cruel, Inhumane, and Degrading Treatments have recommended that Mexico adopt legal measures to exclude human rights violations committed by soldiers from being considered by military tribunals. Instead, these acts must be investigated and judged by civilian authorities.”

For more information (in Spanish):

Fuero militar sigue violando derechos humanos en México: Corte Interamericana (OSC, 18 de mayo de 2015)

Emplaza CoIDH a México cumplir sentencias sobre abusos militares(Proceso, 18 de mayo de 2015)

Insuficiente, la reforma en materia de fuero militar: CIDH (La Jornada, 18 de mayo de 2015)

Reforma al fuero militar en México no cumple la norma internacional: Corte Interamericana de DH (Animal Político, 20 de mayo de 2015)

For more information from SIPAZ (in English):

National: Senate approves reform to Military Justice Code (2 May 2014)


Guerrero: SCJN decision in case of Inés and Valentina “far from the heights” of the SCJN’s resolution on the Rosendo Radilla case (2010)

May 17, 2015

Inés Fernández y Valentina Rosendo (@Amnistía Internacional)

Inés Fernández and Valentina Rosendo (@Amnesty International)

The Tlachinollan Center for Human Rights, which has provided legal counsel for Inés Fernández and Valentina Rosendo, indigenous women who were raped by soldiers in Guerrero in 2002, expressed in a press-release that the Supreme Court for Justice in the Nation (SCJN) has lost all possibility of contributing to the advance of the human rights of indigenous women.  Following several sessions, the Court justices rejected the call made by the Inter-American Court on Human Rights (IACHR) in its decision on the case of the two indigenous women in 2010: for the Mexican State to open a profound analysis of matters of gender, ethnicity, and sexual torture.

Tlachinollan wrote that “the project approved by the SCJN lamentably fails to indicate precisely which obligations the courts have in terms of the legal processes initiated against the suspected perpetrators of the crimes committed against Inés Fernández Ortega and Valentina Rosendo Cantú, a question that the IACHR had alluded to quite explicitly in its sentencing.”  The communique ends: “this resolution is far from the heights represented by the resolution of the case 912/2010, which has to do with Rosendo Radilla, [an activist who was] disappeared by the military in Guerrero in 1974.  It is illuminating in terms of the present status of the SCJN.”

For more information (in Spanish):

Aprueba SCJN alcances de participación del PJF en sentencias de la CIDH(La Jornada, 11 de mayo de 2011)

COMUNICADO | Concluye SCJN sin un análisis profundo en materia de género y etnicidad la revisión de las sentencias de la CoIDH en los casos de Inés y Valentina (Comunicado del Centro de Derechos Humanos de la Montaña Tlachinollan, 11 de mayo de 2015)

Rechaza la Suprema Corte analizar estándares que pidió la Coidh en el caso de Inés y Valentina (El Sur, 12 de mayo de 2015)

Desechan proyecto para juzgar violencia sexual con visión de género (CIMAC Noticias, 12 de mayo de 2015)

For more information from SIPAZ (in English):

Guerrero/National: SCJN examines IACHR sentence in the case of Inés and Valentina, indigenous women who were raped by the military in 2002 (3 May 2015)

Guerrero: Beginning of legal processes against soldiers presumed to be responsible in the cases of Inés Fernández and Valentina Rosendo (15 January 2014)

Guerrero: NGOs call on Peña Nieto to observe the sentences on Inés Fernández y Valentina Rosendo (5 February 2013)

Guerrero: Valentina Rosendo and Inés Fernández receive recognitions of their struggle (16 November 2012)

Guerrero – briefs: Mexican State recognizes responsibility in case of Valentina Rosendo (21 December 2011)


Guerrero: political prisoner Nestora Salgado, Communal Police Commander from Olinalá, begins hunger strike

May 16, 2015

(@kaosenlared.net)

(@kaosenlared.net)

On 5 May, Nestora Salgado García, commander of the Communal Police from Olinalá, who has been imprisoned in a federal institution in Tepic, Nayarit, since August 2013, began a hunger strike amidst the lack of progress in her legal case.  She expressed that she was prepared to die to demand that this process advance: “I do not believe it is just that I will now have spent two years here, with my legal case arrested.  I have never been had the chance to make a broad statement, nor have my accusers ever presented their charges against me.  They have done nothing with me.  I am losing my life and health.”  Her husband, José Luis Ávila Báez, reported that he would sent a report to the Inter-American Commission on Human Rights (IACHR) to denounce that the precautionary measures which were awarded to Nestora Salgado on 28 January still have not been implemented.

Leonel Rivero Rodríguez, Nestora’s counsel, has pressed the federal government to transfer the prisoner somewhere where she can have her health managed and develop the necessary meetings for her legal case to progress.

Meanwhile, governor Rogelio Ortega Martínez affirmed once again that he has newly requested that the state prosecutor review the case for its nullification.  He added that another step could be taken, as the Popular Movement of Guerrero (MPG) had suggested: that is, to say, an amnesty law.

For more information (in Spanish):

Está Nestora Salgado en huelga de hambre en la cárcel de Tepic; su proceso no avanza, se queja (El Sur, 8 de mayo de 2015)

Nestora Salgado, en huelga de hambre (Proceso, 8 de mayo de 2015)

Mantiene Nestora Salgado huelga de hambre; exigen cambiarla de penal (La Jornada, 10 de mayo de 2015)

El agobio en la prisión orilló a Nestora Salgado a ponerse en huelga de hambre (La Jornada, 10 de mayo de 2015)

For more information from SIPAZ (in English):

Guerrero: IACHR calls on Mexican government to guarantee medical attention to Nestora Salgado (8 February 2015)

Guerrero: Delay in release for Nestora Salgado; her daughter claims to have been threatened by phone (5 February 2015)

Guerrero: Death-threat directed against Nestora Salgado’s daughter and Communal Police commander from Olinalá (25 October 2014)

Guerrero: A year after Nestora Salgado’s arrest, organizations demand her immediate release (2 September 2014)


Guerrero: Ayotzinapa – seven months of impunity and struggling for justice

May 3, 2015
DSCF4155

Photo @SIPAZ

On 26 April, 7 months after the forcible disappearance of the 43 students from the Ayotzinapa Rural Normal School, some 400 people installed in Mexico City an “antimonument” to commemorate the fact that this State atrocity continues to go unresolved.  After the antimonument was installed, Melitón Ortega, one of the parents of the disappeared students, stressed that seven months have passed during which the relatives of the disappeared have sought justice and truth, but these months have also implied a great deal of pain and frustration.  Ortega demanded that the Federal Attorney General’s Office attend to the recommendations of the interdisciplinary group of experts from the Inter-American Commission on Human Rights to open new lines of investigation in the case, and to analyze the presumed participation of the military and the former governor Ángel Aguirre in the State crime.

On 23 April, Cuitláhuac and Lenin Mondragón attended the tenth Latin American Conference on Critical Jurisprudence “For Memory and Against Forgetting” that was held at the Center for Interdisciplinary Investigations in the Sciences and Humanities at the National Autonomous University of Mexico (UNAM).  They denounced that the murder of Julio César (the only one of the 43 youth whose remains have been found) has not been adequately covered by the Federal Attorney General’s Office (PGR), for the Guerrero state authorities have not carried out a “scientific investigation” to find and punish those responsible.  They demanded that the authorities provide justice in the case against the students, punishment of the intellectual and material authors of the crime, compensation of damages to the relatives of the disappeared in accordance with international standards, promises of non-repetition, the opening of new lines of investigation, and a formal recognition of the forcible disappearance of the 43 students, the extrajudicial murder of another six persons, including Julio César, and a recognition that Julio was tortured before his murder.

To demand justice, the defense lawyer Sayuri Herrera announced to SDP News that the family-members would request a summons before the Inter-American Court on Human Rights (IACHR) to denounce the case, given that, from their view, enough evidence exists to show that Julio César indeed was tortured.

For more information (in Spanish):

Impunidad, principal ganadora, dicen dos familiares de estudiante desollado (La Jornada, 24 de abril de 2015)

Llevarán a la Corte Interamericana asesinato del normalista Julio César Mondragón (SPDNoticias, 23 de abril de 2015)

Instalan antimonumento contra la impunidad por Ayotzinapa (La Jornada, 27 de abril de 2015)

Ayotzinapa: Siete meses de impunidad y lucha por la justicia (Centro ProDH, 27 de abril de 2015)

For more information from SIPAZ (in English):

Guerrero/International: Brigade for Ayotzinapa travels to Europe (24 April 2015)

Guerrero: IACHR experts confirm that the Ayotzinapa case is a forcible disappearance and a crime against humanity (10 April 2015)

Guerrero: Arrival of IACHR group to Mexico provides hope in the Ayotzinapa case (6 de marzo de 2015)

Guerrero: Investigation “based in scientific proof” requested in the Ayotzinapa case (1 March 2015)


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