Chiapas/National: Occupation of gas stations and burning of electoral offices during CNTE protests in Tuxtla Gutiérrez

June 10, 2015

(@EjeCentral)

(@EjeCentral)

To demand the total suspension of the educational reforms and the presentation with life of the 43 detained or disappeared students from the Ayotzinapa Rural Normal School, together with the boycott of the elections on 7 June and 19 July, teachers from the National Coordination of Educational Workers (CNTE) marched on 2 June in the city of Tuxtla Gutiérrez. There they blockaded access to the local council of the National Electoral Institute (INE), removed books and voting cards, and burned them in front of the offices. Protestors also occupied 14 gas stations with the idea of liberating the gas for free to the population. The gas-station owners then shut off the flow of gas, with the exception of one site, leading to long waiting lines. Beyond this, the protestors set fire to the offices of the Institute for Elections and Citizen Participation (IEPC).

CNTE teachers announced that on 3 June, they will blockade the entrances to the capital city of Chiapas, thus inhibiting passage to freight trucks, carrying merchandise that will be distributed tot he population. There are already reports of the appropriation of Coca-Cola and Bimbo trucks. They reported as well that they would install themselves indefinitely outside the INE offices.

In a comment provided for Chiapas Paralelo, Pedro Gómez Bámaca, the Chiapas CNTE state leader, affirmed the union’s total rejection of the electoral process and its candidates “because the political parties are not interested in us teachers or resolving social needs. Instead, they are interested in perpetuating the power of their representatives and groups.” Beyond this, they communicated their agreement to disallow the installation of electoral booths in the schools where CNTE members work.

It bears stressing that the CNTE has announced that, despite the declaration of the Secretary for Public Security (SEP) to indefinitely suspend the testing of teachers, the electoral boycott will be maintained in 11 states, with protest-actions held in another 16. Indefinite strikes continue in Chiapas, Oaxaca, Guerrero, and Michoacán, with various episodes of burning of electoral cards and occupations of electoral offices.

For more information (in Spanish):

Ayer repartieron gasolina, hoy mercancía, maestros incrementan acciones de protesta(Chiapas Paralelo, 3 de junio de 2015)

Maestros de la CNTE toman 14 gasolineras y oficinas del INE en Chiapas (Aristegui Noticias, 3 de junio de 2015)

Acuerdan maestros toma de oficinas del INE y toma y “liberación” de combustible en 14 gasolineras en Tuxtla (Chiapas Paralelo, 1 de junio de 2015)

Maestros de Oaxaca sustraen papelería electoral y exigen a Peña retiro del Ejército(Proceso, 1 de junio de 2015)

Radicaliza magisterio disidente protestas contra elecciones (El Universal, 3 de junio de 2015)

Inalterable, el boicot electoral en al menos 11 estados, indica la CNTE (La Jornada, 31 de mayo de 2015)

For more information from SIPAZ (in English):

Guerrero: Murders and death-threats against candidates for June elections (17 May 2015)

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Guerrero: SCJN decision in case of Inés and Valentina “far from the heights” of the SCJN’s resolution on the Rosendo Radilla case (2010)

May 17, 2015

Inés Fernández y Valentina Rosendo (@Amnistía Internacional)

Inés Fernández and Valentina Rosendo (@Amnesty International)

The Tlachinollan Center for Human Rights, which has provided legal counsel for Inés Fernández and Valentina Rosendo, indigenous women who were raped by soldiers in Guerrero in 2002, expressed in a press-release that the Supreme Court for Justice in the Nation (SCJN) has lost all possibility of contributing to the advance of the human rights of indigenous women.  Following several sessions, the Court justices rejected the call made by the Inter-American Court on Human Rights (IACHR) in its decision on the case of the two indigenous women in 2010: for the Mexican State to open a profound analysis of matters of gender, ethnicity, and sexual torture.

Tlachinollan wrote that “the project approved by the SCJN lamentably fails to indicate precisely which obligations the courts have in terms of the legal processes initiated against the suspected perpetrators of the crimes committed against Inés Fernández Ortega and Valentina Rosendo Cantú, a question that the IACHR had alluded to quite explicitly in its sentencing.”  The communique ends: “this resolution is far from the heights represented by the resolution of the case 912/2010, which has to do with Rosendo Radilla, [an activist who was] disappeared by the military in Guerrero in 1974.  It is illuminating in terms of the present status of the SCJN.”

For more information (in Spanish):

Aprueba SCJN alcances de participación del PJF en sentencias de la CIDH(La Jornada, 11 de mayo de 2011)

COMUNICADO | Concluye SCJN sin un análisis profundo en materia de género y etnicidad la revisión de las sentencias de la CoIDH en los casos de Inés y Valentina (Comunicado del Centro de Derechos Humanos de la Montaña Tlachinollan, 11 de mayo de 2015)

Rechaza la Suprema Corte analizar estándares que pidió la Coidh en el caso de Inés y Valentina (El Sur, 12 de mayo de 2015)

Desechan proyecto para juzgar violencia sexual con visión de género (CIMAC Noticias, 12 de mayo de 2015)

For more information from SIPAZ (in English):

Guerrero/National: SCJN examines IACHR sentence in the case of Inés and Valentina, indigenous women who were raped by the military in 2002 (3 May 2015)

Guerrero: Beginning of legal processes against soldiers presumed to be responsible in the cases of Inés Fernández and Valentina Rosendo (15 January 2014)

Guerrero: NGOs call on Peña Nieto to observe the sentences on Inés Fernández y Valentina Rosendo (5 February 2013)

Guerrero: Valentina Rosendo and Inés Fernández receive recognitions of their struggle (16 November 2012)

Guerrero – briefs: Mexican State recognizes responsibility in case of Valentina Rosendo (21 December 2011)


Guerrero/National: SCJN examines IACHR sentence in the case of Inés and Valentina, indigenous women who were raped by the military in 2002

May 3, 2015

Inés y Valentina (@Tlachinollan)Inés and Valentina (@Tlachinollan)

On 21 April, the plenary of the Supreme Court for Justice in the Nation (SCJN) began a discussion regarding the sentence provided by the Inter-American Court on Human Rights (IACHR) in August 2010 which condemned the Mexican State for the violation of the human rights of Valentina Rosendo Cantú and Inés Fernández Ortega, indigenous women who were sexually assaulted by soldiers in Guerrero state in 2002.

Valentina and Inés have requested that the SCJN treat their case as it did the Radilla case (a forcible disappearance, also from Guerrero state) to determine the obligations of the judiciary amidst the sentences emitted by the IACHR.  They believe that the discussion within the Supreme Court is critically important, as this could lead to penal processes against soldiers with a focus on sexual torture and the administration of justice with a sensitivity to matters of gender and ethnicity, among other questions.

The Tlachinollan Mountain Center for Human Rights, which has provided counsel for the two indigenous women, has declared that the process of debate “opens the possibility that the SCJN would recognize the symbolic struggle for justice that both women have undertaken, and to hand down criteria that would help indigenous women experience better conditions in their search for justice.  Above all, it would contribute to the cause of having sexual torture by investigated and adequately judged in Mexico.”

However, during one of the initial sessions, the SCJN decided to exclude from consideration the constitutionality of part II of the new article 57 of the Military Justice Code, which has to do with military tribunals.  Civil-society organizations present at the session expressed their concern due to this evident lack of concern for a deep analysis of the question.

For more information (in Spanish):

COMUNICADO “Inicia la SCJN discusión sobre las obligaciones del Poder Judicial de la Federación frente a las sentencias dictadas por la Corte Interamericana de Derechos Humanos en los casos de Inés Fernández y Valentina Rosendo” (Centro de Derechos Humanos de la Montaña Tlachinollan, 21 de abril de 2015)

Discute SCJN sentencia de CIDH por violación a indígenas en 2002 (La Jornada, 21 de abril de 2015)

Resoluciones de COIDH son obligatorias (El Universal, 21 de abril de 2015)

SCJN no revisará ley militar en caso de Valentina Rosendo e Inés Fernández (La Jornada, 23 de abril de 2015)

For more information from SIPAZ (in English):

Guerrero: Beginning of legal processes against soldiers presumed to be responsible in the cases of Inés Fernández and Valentina Rosendo (15 January 2014)

Guerrero: NGOs call on Peña Nieto to observe the sentences on Inés Fernández y Valentina Rosendo (5 February 2013)

Guerrero: Valentina Rosendo and Inés Fernández receive recognitions of their struggle (16 November 2012)

Guerrero – briefs: Mexican State recognizes responsibility in case of Valentina Rosendo (21 December 2011)


Guerrero: Beginning of legal processes against soldiers presumed as responsible in the cases of Inés Fernández and Valentina Rosendo

January 15, 2014

(@justiciaporinesyvalentina.wordpress.com)

(@justiciaporinesyvalentina.wordpress.com)

During the final third of 2013, the Federal Attorney General’s Office (PGR) arrested four soldiers from the Mexican Army who in February and March 2002 presumably raped the Guerrerense indigenous women Valentina Rosendo Cantú and Inés Fernández Ortega.  In both cases, the Mexican State was judged and found guilty by the Inter-American Court on Human Rights in August 2010.  Three of the four subjects remained as soldiers at the time of their arrests.

In a 9 January 2014 press release, the Tlachinollan Mountain Center for Human Rights announced the beginning of the legal processes on the charges of rape, torture, and abuse of authority, among others.  The bulletin emphasized that “this decisive step toward justice for Inés Fernández Ortega and Valentina Rosendo Cantú, nearly twelve years since the occurrence of the acts, would have been impossible without the resolve of the two Me’phaa women.  In this sense, it is an emblematic triumph for all women who, despite the obstacles and adversities, raise their voices and denounce violence.”  Tlachinollan demanded that “the security and integrity of both women, their families, and their representatives be guaranteed.  Toward this end, it will be indispensable that national and international public opinion continue following the course of the trials which have just begun.

For more information (in Spanish):

COMUNICADO | Comienzan procesos penales contra probables responsables de las violaciones graves de Derechos Humanos cometidas contra Inés Fernández y Valentina Rosendo (Tlachinollan, 9 de enero de 2014)

Capturan a militares por violar a indígenas hace 12 años (Animal político, 6 de enero de 2014)

For more information from SIPAZ (in English):

Guerrero: NGOs call on Peña Nieto to observe the sentences on Inés Fernández y Valentina Rosendo (5 February 2013)

Guerrero: Valentina Rosendo and Inés Fernández receive recognitions of their struggle (16 November 2012)

Guerrero – briefs: Mexican State recognizes responsibility in case of Valentina Rosendo (21 December 2011)


Guerrero: Governance pretends to have observed IACHR sentence, claim NGOs

July 20, 2013

DSCF1236

Inés Fernández Ortega, photo @SIPAZ

Civil organizations denounced that the Secretary of Governance claimed to have observed measures that in fact had not been observed in the sentence released against the Mexican State by the Inter-American Court on Human Rights (IACHR) in the cases of Inés Fernández Ortega and Valentina Rosendo Cantú, indigenous women of Guerrero who were sexually abused by soldiers in 2002.  The Center for Justice and International Law (CEJIL) and the Tlachinollan Mountain Center for Human Rights, as well as the Organization of the Me’phaa Indigenous People (OPIM), sent a letter to the Secretary of Governance, Miguel Ángel Osorio Chong, in which they express their concern and confusion in these terms.  “In the response, Governance claimed to have observed measures that in fact have not been observed and makes claims that have very little to do with reality,” they mention.  Furthermore, the organizations reported that in these cases “there exists lack of observation in terms of compensation, health, and education, whose mechanisms of observation have not been realized.  The fault in these terms lies directly with Governance.”

For more information (in Spanish):

ONG: Gobernación finge haber cumplido sentencia de la CIDH (La Jornada, 2 de julio de 2013)

Carta de las ONGs a SEGOB (1 de julio de 2013)

For more information from SIPAZ (in English):

Guerrero: NGOs call on Peña Nieto to observe the sentences on Inés Fernández and Valentina Rosendo (5 February 2013)

Guerrero – briefs: Mexican State recognizes responsibility in case of Valentina Rosendo (21 December 2011)

Guerrero – briefs: NGO informs US authorities regarding Mexico’s obligations under Mérida Initiative (26 November 2011)

Guerrero – briefs: NGO demands that Calderón observe sentence in case of Valentina Rosendo and Inés Fernández (28 November 2011)

Guerrero – briefs: Judge acquits attacker of Radio Ñomndaa Committee member; Interior Ministry evades compliance with sentencing in the case of Inés and Valentina (4 February 2011)

 


Guerrero: death-threats directed against Obtilia Eugenio Manuel, president of the OPIM

February 26, 2013

Obtilia Eugenio Manuel (@Amnistía Internacional)

The National Network of Communication and Urgent Action for Human-Rights Defenders in Mexico has condemned the new death-threats directed against human-rights defender Obtilia Eugenio Manuel, president of the Organization of the Me’phaa Indigenous Peoples (OPIM), based in Ayutla de los Libres.  An anonymous letter was found at midday on 11 February in the OPIM offices which said that “You Obtilia are enjoying precautionary measures, but no matter we will beat you Obtilia and Cuauhtémoc, as you are the leaders… The Inter-American Commission on Human Rights does not protect you from bullets.” It should be remembered that she and all OPIM members enjoy precautionary measures, as awarded by the Inter-American Court on Human Rights (IACHR) in 2009.

The death-threat, as asserts the communique, makes mention that it is not clear that it was soldiers who raped Inés Fernández Ortega, a Me’phaa indigenous woman and member of the OPIM who took her case before the IACHR.  The IACHR in turn released a sentence of condemnation for the Mexican State in October 2010.

The urgent bulletin of the National Network details that “Lamentably, this is not the first time that Obtilia Eugenio has received this type of threat against her life, as related directly to her denunciations of human-rights violations committed in the state of Guerrero.  Obtilia Eugenio has been victimized by permanent harassment and has been forced to leave the state of Guerrero so as to protect her physical and psychological life, as well as that of her family.”

For more information (in Spanish):

Amenazan de muerte a indígena que denunció violación por parte de militares (Proceso, 20 de febrero de 2013)

Boletín de prensa de la Red Nacional de Comunicación y Acción Urgente de Defensoras de Derechos Humanos en México

For more information in Spanish (in English):

Guerrero: Lucio Cabañas’ widow and her sister are murdered (17 July 2011)

Guerrero: The ecologist campesino Javier Torres Cruz is murdered (6 May 2011)

Guerrero – briefs:  Concern for the safety of the inhabitants of La Morena (28 December 2010)

Guerrero: briefs – New threats against leaders of the OPIM; inclusion of resources for La Parota in federal budget; Invitation to the sixth anniversary of Radio Ñomndaa (14 December 2010)

Guerrero: briefs – NGOs present amicus brief to Inter-American Court on case of environmentalists; activist is detained (September 23, 2010)

Guerrero: Torres reappears with signs of torture (29 December 2008)


Guerrero: Valentina Rosendo and Inés Fernández receive recognitions of their struggle

November 16, 2012

Photo @Tlachinollan

In observance of the inauguration of the OAS IX Meeting of Committee of Experts of the Mechanism for Continuation of the Implementation of the Inter-American Convention to Prevent, Sanction, and Eradicate Violence against Women “Belém Do Pará” (MESECVI), Valentina Rosendo Cantú, a Me’phaa indigenous woman from the state of Guerrero, received a recognition from the hands of Patricia Olamendi, Coordinator of the Committee of Experts of the MESECVI, for her invaluable support for the defense and promotion of the human rights of women on the American continent.  This recognition was also extended to Inés Fernández Ortega, who could not attend the meeting.  Referring to the implementation of the sentence handed down by the Inter-American Court on Human Rights (October 2010), Valentina Rosendo said, “Today, we have advanced, but though the government says that it has done things to help women and make justice, investigations are missing.”

For more information (in Spanish):

Boletín de prensa de 14 de noviembre de 2012

Valentina Rosendo Cantú recibe reconocimiento del Comité de Expertas del MESECVI de la Convención de Belém do Pará (Cencos, 14 de noviembre 2012)

For more information from SIPAZ (in English):

Guerrero  briefs: Mexican State recognizes responsibility in case of Valentina Rosendo (21 December 2011)

Guerrero – briefs: NGO informs US authorities regarding Mexico’s obligations under Mérida Initiative (26 November 2011)

Guerrero – briefs: NGO demands that Calderón observe sentence in case of Valentina Rosendo and Inés Fernández (28 November 2011)

Guerrero – briefs: Judge acquits attacker of Radio Ñomndaa Committee member; Interior Ministry evades compliance with sentencing in the case of Inés and Valentina (4 February 2011)