Chiapas: 18 years since the Acteal massacre

December 27, 2015

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Acteal, 22 December 2015 (@SIPAZ)

On 22 December 2015, 18 years since the massacre of 45 indigenous persons in Acteal, Chenalhó municipality, the Las Abejas Civil Society (organization to which the victims had pertained) carried out a pilgrimage and a commemoration of the events to denounce the impunity that continues to prevail in the case. In a communique, Las Abejas stressed that, “the bad government investigating the intellectual authors of this crime through the badly named ‘Supreme Court for Justice in the Nation,’ that is to say, the ‘Supreme Court for the Rich and Criminals,’ has ordered the massive release of the paramilitaries who performed the massacre. As far as we can tell, only 2 are left incarcerated, and at any moment will they also be released. Thus it remains clear to us that justice will not be granted by the government, because the Mexican State is the one that gave the order for the massacre, such that it is a criminal party and cannot rightfully be judge in the case. The Mexican justice system is expired and rotten. It is very clear that, if we wish to have true justice, we organized peoples of Mexico must construct a true, dignified, thorough, and humane justice.” Las Abejas ended the communique stressing that “Memory is an act of Justice!”

For his part, the director of the Fray Bartolomé de las Casas Center for Human Rights (CDHFBC), Pedro Faro Navarro, denounced that in the Acteal case, “there has been no justice, and the wall of impunity persists.” He added that “state officials, including Ernesto Zedillo, clearly knew what was happening in Chenalhó, in terms of the precedents and the moment at which the massacre was happening, due to reports from the Mexican Army which had been deployed in the Highlands region, thus confirming the direct participation of the Mexican State in the Acteal massacre. The national context shows us that justice will not come from above, nor from those in power or those who administer the State, let alone the existing power-groups or anyone who manipulates and corrupts [the people], who are the owners of the justice system in Mexico.” He noted that for this reason, the Las Abejas Civil Society “is building through its steadfastness another justice,” such that “one possible conclusion is that the future of the people who have been degraded and discriminated against will need no justice from the State.”

For more information (in Spanish):

La memoria es un acto de Justicia – XVIII Conmemoración de la masacre de Acteal (Sociedad Civil Las Abejas de Acteal, 22 de diciembre de 2015)

Boletín 18 aniversario de la masacre de Acteal (Centro de Derechos Humanos Fray Bartolomé de Las Casas, 22 de diciembre de 2015)

Impune, el “crimen de Estado” en Acteal: Las Abejas (La Jornada, 22 de diciembre de 2015)

Acteal: 18 años de violencia (La Jornada, 23 de diciembre de 2015)

Conmemoran 18 años de matanza de Acteal (El Universal, 23 de diciembre de 2015)

Acteal: 18 años de impunidad (Desinformemonos, 22 de diciembre de 2015)

A 18 años de la matanza de Acteal persiste la impunidad: Frayba (Proceso, 23 de diciembre de 2015)

For more information from SIPAZ (in English):

Chiapas: Las Abejas reject ‘friendly solution’ with Mexican State (25 October 2015)

Chiapas: Monthly commemoration by Las Abejas de Acteal (8 October 2015)

Chiapas: Las Abejas of Acteal denounce 6 years of release of paramilitaries (10 September 2015)

Chiapas: A member of the Las Abejas Civil Society is murdered (2 July 2015)

Chiapas: TPP pre-audience judges Mexican State for crimes against humanity (27 July 2014)

 

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Guerrero: update in the Ayotzinapa case

December 17, 2014

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Photo @SIPAZ

The parents and relatives of the disappeared normalist students have rejected the version presented by the Federal Attorney General’s Office (PGR) that the youth were burned and reduced to ashes in the garbage-dump of Cocula, Guerrero.  The families held that the remains of Alexander Mora Venancio, the only one of the 43 students who has been identified, were provided by the government to maintain the version of the three narco-hitmen who confessed to burning the remains of the students after killing them.  “The Argentinian investigators cannot confirm that these remains were found in Cocula, because they were not present at the time of the discovery of the remains [of Alexander Mora], such that the black bags containing the remains were open,” said a representative.  The director of the Institute for Forensic Medicine in Innsbruck, Austria, affirmed that expectations are “very low” that the laboratory will be able to identify the human remains that were presumably found in Cocula, because the conditions to which they were consciously exposed converted them to a “very challenging” state.

Beyond this, civil-society organizations have defended the legal representatives of the families of the 43 students disappeared by the police in Iguala, after it was reported that the Center for Investigation and National Security (CISEN), associated with the Secretary of Governance, had qualified them as a “danger for governance,” making reference to members of the Tlachinollan Mountain Center for Human Rights.  In a communique, 19 human-rights organizations denounced and lamented that the government would try to discredit human-rights defenders and use public resources to weaken the movement for the disappeared in place of employing the capacities of intelligence agencies to combat the infiltration and corruption of the “narco-State” and ensure that grave human-rights violations do not remain in impunity.

On 3 December, the UN Office of the High Commissioner for Human Rights (OACNUDH) visited the Rural Normal school of Ayotzinapa to meet with relatives and friends of the disappeared students.  The visit was part of a follow-up campaign that the OACNUDH has provided in the case.  The Office reiterated its solidarity and energetic denunciation of the events of Iguala.

In a communique from 10 December, the German Coordination for Human Rights in Mexico demanded that the government of Enrique Peña Nieto clarify the role played by the Mexican Army and federal police in the disappearance of the 43 students.  In this way, it also demanded that Angela Merkel’s government suspend negotiations regarding security agreements with Mexico until the latter government provides a report on the general situation of human rights in Mexico.  On 10 December, the German daily Tages Zeitung reported that at least 36 of the weapons presumably used against the normalist students of Ayotzinapa were G-36 German assault rifles, produced by the Heckler & Koch corporation.  A day previous, on 9 December, deputies of the green parties in the European Parliament protested inside the parliament building in Brussels, demanding that the Mexican government use all possible means of finding the disappeared students from the Raúl Isidro Burgos Rural Normal School alive.

For more information (in Spanish):

Defienden 19 ONG a Vidulfo Rosales y Abel barrera ante ataques del CISEN (El Sur de Acapulco, 9 de diciembre de 2014)

Comunicado de prensa – ONU-DH visita a familiares y compañeros de los normalistas en Ayotzinapa y reitera su respaldo a sus demandas de justicia (Tlachinallon, 3 de diciembre de 2014)

Defendamos a Tlachinollan ante ataques del Cisen (EDUCA, 9 de diciembre de 2014)

Son “muy bajas” las expectativas para identificar los restos de Cocula, dice la universidad de Austria (El Sur de Acapulco, 9 de diciembre de 2014)

Ayotzinapa: Vivos los queremos (El Topil, diciembre de 2014)

Comunicado de prensa (Coordinación alemana, 10 de diciembre de 2014)

Acuerdo de seguridad Alemania-México: inminente y poco transparente(Deutsche Welle, 10 de diciembre de 2014)

Se utilizaron armas alemanas en ataque a normalistas (Proceso, 10 de diciembre de 2014)

For more information from SIPAZ (in English):

Oaxaca: State police strike leads to 153 officers being fired

September 29, 2014


Protesta con el lema "Basta de política" @ Enfoque Oaxaca

Banner at protest: “Enough of politics” @ Enfoque Oaxaca

Since 14 September, some 600 state police officers of Oaxaca have been on strike to demand the resignation of the Secretary for Public Security, Alberto Esteva Salinas, and the commissioner of the State Preventive Police, Cuauhtémoc Zúñiga Bonilla, in addition to other police chiefs, whom they accuse of corruption and of embezzlement of public campaign funds.  Based in the barracks of Santa María Coyotepec, they denounced that 2.5 million pesos worth of travel allowances had yet to be paid, and they manifested being tired of arbitrary actions, demanding an increase in salary, the provision of uniforms twice a year, and an eight-hour workday.  Similarly, the coastal region saw a similar police strike, while in the Tehuantepec Isthmus, police were arrested by Mexican Army units as they traveled to the capital city to support the action.

On 16 September, half a hundred state police invaded the end of the commemorative march to march the 204th anniversary of the beginning of (formal) independence for Mexico, an event which was not attended by Governor Gabino Cué Monteagudo.  Using the slogans “Enough of politics” and “Out with the corrupt [ones] Alberto Esteva and Cuahutemoc Zuñiga (sic),” among others, police demonstrated their repudiation of the situation and showed the bad state of the equipment they use, in addition to uniforms, which were shown to have damaged logos, discoloration, and other damages.

On 18 September, the president of the Permanent Commission for Citizens’ Protection and Security from the local congress affirmed that an initial agreement had been made to pay the travel allowances in arrears, as well as to provide uniforms and boots to police.  Nonetheless, other media mentioned that Esteva Salinas, Secretary of Public Security, fired 153 members of the State Preventive Police, who are presumed to have initiated the strike.

It should be recalled that this is the second police strike this year.  The first took place in March, when police in revolt also requested ameliorative reforms and resignations.

For more information (in Spanish):

Policías de Oaxaca permiten acceso a personal administrativo (Milenio, 18 de septiembre de 2014)

Paro de policías desnuda corrupción en SSP, les adeudan 2.5 mdp solo de viáticos (Página 3, 16 de septiembre de 2014)

‘Desaira’ Cué el desfile; policías lo utilizan para protestar (Enfoque Oaxaca, 16 de septiembre de 2014)

Gabino Cué da ultimátum a policías en rebeldía e ignora sus demandas(Página 3, 17 de septiembre de 2014)

Despiden a 153 policías que “instigaron” al paro laboral en Oaxaca(Proceso, 18 de septiembre de 2014)

Audio-Video:

En paro de labores contradesfiló la SSP en #Oaxaca (Voces de Oaxaca, 17 de septiembre de 2014)


Guerrero: Beginning of legal processes against soldiers presumed as responsible in the cases of Inés Fernández and Valentina Rosendo

January 15, 2014

(@justiciaporinesyvalentina.wordpress.com)

(@justiciaporinesyvalentina.wordpress.com)

During the final third of 2013, the Federal Attorney General’s Office (PGR) arrested four soldiers from the Mexican Army who in February and March 2002 presumably raped the Guerrerense indigenous women Valentina Rosendo Cantú and Inés Fernández Ortega.  In both cases, the Mexican State was judged and found guilty by the Inter-American Court on Human Rights in August 2010.  Three of the four subjects remained as soldiers at the time of their arrests.

In a 9 January 2014 press release, the Tlachinollan Mountain Center for Human Rights announced the beginning of the legal processes on the charges of rape, torture, and abuse of authority, among others.  The bulletin emphasized that “this decisive step toward justice for Inés Fernández Ortega and Valentina Rosendo Cantú, nearly twelve years since the occurrence of the acts, would have been impossible without the resolve of the two Me’phaa women.  In this sense, it is an emblematic triumph for all women who, despite the obstacles and adversities, raise their voices and denounce violence.”  Tlachinollan demanded that “the security and integrity of both women, their families, and their representatives be guaranteed.  Toward this end, it will be indispensable that national and international public opinion continue following the course of the trials which have just begun.

For more information (in Spanish):

COMUNICADO | Comienzan procesos penales contra probables responsables de las violaciones graves de Derechos Humanos cometidas contra Inés Fernández y Valentina Rosendo (Tlachinollan, 9 de enero de 2014)

Capturan a militares por violar a indígenas hace 12 años (Animal político, 6 de enero de 2014)

For more information from SIPAZ (in English):

Guerrero: NGOs call on Peña Nieto to observe the sentences on Inés Fernández y Valentina Rosendo (5 February 2013)

Guerrero: Valentina Rosendo and Inés Fernández receive recognitions of their struggle (16 November 2012)

Guerrero – briefs: Mexican State recognizes responsibility in case of Valentina Rosendo (21 December 2011)


Guerrero: Popular Police of Olinalá denounces military invasions of communities

June 10, 2013

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Photo @Tiyako Felipe

On 27 May, the Regional Coordination for Justice and Security-Communal and Popular Police (CRSJ-PCP) released a communique in which it denounces and demands the immediate withdrawal of the Mexican Army that invaded the communal territory of Temalacatzingo, Olinalá municipality, on 26 May, where the PCP has presence.  In the communique, the PCP reported that the incursion took place 10 days after it released its political manifesto, in which it “stresses the means by which we are building popular sovereignty.  These governmental actions we see as a manner of continuing with its politics of intimidation, harassment, and repression toward the communities where we have organized, under the principle of the life of popular sovereignty, thus forming our Communal and Popular Police as a means of self-defense amidst different types of violence.”  In the communique, the Coordination demands that “the government of Guerrero and Mexico immediately withdraw the Army from our communal territory.  Here we do not need your services; here we take care of ourselves and protect ourselves.”

For more information (in Spanish):

Denuncia Policía Popular de Olinalá incursiones militares en comunidades (La Jornada de Guerrero, 29 de mayo de 2013)

Policía Ciudadana y Popular (PCP) de Guerrero exige el retiro inmediato del ejército del territorio comunal de Temalacatzingo, Olinalá. (Somos el medio, 29 de mayo de 2013)

Luchando por la soberanía popular (Agencia Subversiones, 20 de mayo de 2013)

For more information from SIPAZ (in English):

Guerrero: Social insurrection in Olinalá against organized crime (9 November 2012)