Guerrero: Article 19 urges to investigate political motivations in the case of the murder of the journalist, Gabriel Soriano

November 4, 2018
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@Article 19


In a statement on October 28, the organization for freedom of expression Article 19 urged to investigate possible political motivations in the case of the murder of journalist Gabriel Soriano Kuri. This fact occurred four days earlier in an armed attack in Acapulco, after Soriano ended to give technical support to the journalistic coverage of Radio & Television Guerrero (RTG) to a report of Governor Hector Astudillo Flores.

The Attorney General’s Office has been disseminating a version of the facts according to which the murder was allegedly due to a “road incident”. However, Article 19 referred that one day after the murder of Soriano, a dismembered body was found in the La Poza neighborhood, located in the Diamond Zone of Acapulco with a message that, according to a photo circulating in the media, says the following: “Here you have to respect me fucking government; if you continue to have deals with the Cida (Independent Cartel of Acapulco) that will be the end of you all, journalists and government, you are going to suck my cock. Here (…) the “amarillos” (the Yellows) prevail.

Article 19 recalled that on more than one occasion it has expressed that “Guerrero exemplifies the institutional weakness and the infiltration capacity of organized crime in public entities.” It demanded to clarify whether the assassination of Gabriel was an attack directed and perpetrated by alleged members of organized crime with political motivations. “If so, this homicide would be an unprecedented event because it would confirm that drug trafficking is using the press as cannon fodder to politically press public authorities to achieve their ends. This would signal the beginning of a new form of organized crime violence against journalism”, said.

It also urged the Protection Mechanism for Human Rights Defenders and Journalists to take measures to guarantee the life and personal integrity of the family of Gabriel Soriano as well as of his fellow RTG colleagues.

For more information (in Spanish) :

No hay despegue de violencia, sino asesinatos que causan impacto: gobernador (Acapulco News, 30 de octubre de 2018)

Exige la Felap investigar a fondo el asesinato de Gabriel Soriano (La Jornada de Guerrero, 29 de octubre de 2018)

Llaman a a investigar motivaciones políticas detrás de asesinato del periodista en Guerrero (Centro Pro DH, 30 de octubre de 2018)

El homicidio de Gabriel Soriano en Acapulco: ¿una nueva forma de violencia del narcotráfico contra el periodismo? (Artículo 19, 28 de octubre de 2018)

For more information from SIPAZ:

Guerrero: Radio and TV Broadcaster from Guerrero Murdered (November 1, 2018)

National/International: UN and IACHR Rapporteurs for Freedom of Expression Call on Mexico to Increase its Efforts to Protect Journalists (December 27th, 2017)

Guerrero: Intimidation of El Sur Reporter Zacarias Cervantes Reported (November 30th, 2017)

Guerrero: Attack on Proceso Correspondent (June 14th, 2017)

Guerrero: Xochistlahuaca Reporter Shot at in Ometepec (June 7th, 2017)

Guerrero: Journalist Cecilio Pineda Murdered (March 8, 2017)

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Guerrero: 4 communal police killed in El Fortín, Tixtla

December 26, 2015

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Image of the funeral of one of the murdered communal police

Photo @Sergio Ocampo

On 27 November were buried the four members of the justice house La Patria es Primero (“The Nation First”), affiliated with the Regional Coordination of Communal Authorities-Communal Police (CRAC-PC), who were killed the previous Thursday in Tixtla by presumed members of organized-crime groups.  The prosecutorial office of Guerrero state released a communique reporting that it will “investigate the aggression perpetrated against seven members of the CRAC-PC’s justice house […] in which four of these agents lost their lives in the Tixtla municipality.”  According to the representatives of the justice house in question, behind the execution of their comrades the responsibility likely belongs to the organized-crime groups Los ardillos and Los rojos that are battling over control of the Tixtla plaza.

For more information (in Spanish):

Sepultan a 4 policías comunitarios asesinados en El Fortín, Guerrero (La Jornada, 28 de noviembre de 2015)

Matan en Tixtla a 4 integrantes de la policía comunitaria (La Jornada, 26 de noviembre de 2015)

Asesinato de cuatro policías comunitarios en Tixtla es una declaratoria de guerra: CRAC (Cambio de Michoacan, 27 de noviembre de 2015)


Chiapas: Center for Women’s Rights in Chiapas denounces threats

December 26, 2015

CDMCh

On 2 December, the Center for Women’s Rights in Chiapas, A.C. (CdmCh) publicly denounced threats it had received. That same day, “at 4:20pm, we received a telephone call from a man calling himself ISIDRO LARA or NICANDRO DÍAZ, who identified himself as commander of the Zetas cartel and extorted the General Coordination, adding that he knew where we live, and that if we did not pay there would be consequences, and that the workers and their families would be targeted.”

The CdmCh added that “this incident joins other acts of intimidation that have occurred in the last month, given that on 26 November, around 1:00pm, one of the comrade defenders received a call to her cell phone from a woman who extorted her by saying she had kidnapped one of her relatives. Beyond this, it has been observed that outside the central office […] two vehicles without licenses patrol the zone. One of the vehicles was carrying three men who hid their faces.”

One element that worsens alarm amidst these threats has to do with the fact that, as the CdmCh affirmed, those who have made the calls have known the private information of workers at the organization.

Since 2004, CdmCh has been working to advance human rights, without discrimination based on gender, class, or ethnicity, and it has investigated and analyzed the human-rights violations of women.

For more information (in Spanish):

Denuncia completa del Centro de Derechos de la Mujer de Chiapas (2 de diciembre de 2015)

Denuncian defensoras en Chiapas intento de extorsión (CIMAC Noticias, 3 de diciembre de 2015)

Boletín: Preocupación por la intimidación, vigilancia y amenazas al Centro de Derechos de la Mujer de Chiapas (CDHFBC, 4 de diciembre de 2015)

Exigen protección para Centro de Derechos de la Mujer de Chiapas (La Jornada, 5 de diciembre de 2015)

For more information from SIPAZ (in English):

Chiapas: During International Women’s Day on 8 March, a meeting, a march, and a rally (10 March 2015)

National: Multiple activities for International Women’s Day (16 March 2014)

Chiapas: Forum on “The rights of childhood and adolescence in southeastern Mexico” (15 March 2014)

Oaxaca: Request of activation of Gender Alert amidst increase in number of femicides (2 March 2014)


Mexico: 5 years since the massacre of 72 migrants in San Fernando, Tamaulipas

September 11, 2015

La 72 Hogar Refugio Para Personas Migrantes @VICE “La 72,” Refuge Home for Migrants @VICE

Five years ago, on 23 August 2010, 72 bodies of migrants appeared in San Fernando, Tamaulipas. 58 men and 14 women, principally from Central and South America, were kidnapped and executed in a ranch in San Fernando, close to the border with Texas. The indignation over the case was immediate. San Fernando recalled all those who are made invisible during their passage through Mexico in search of a new life. Since that time, the authorities have arrested a number of individuals but have not published information regarding whether anyone has been sentenced. Amnesty International (AI) has warned that the lack of investigation in the case “gives a green light to the criminal groups that terrorize and murder those who cross Mexico in search of security and a better life.” AI also hypothesizes that those responsible belong to criminal gangs, and it suspects that many of these worked in collusion with local security agents.

In Tenosique, Tabasco, the year after these events transpired, in honor of the 72 victims, there was founded the “72 Refuge Home for Migrants,” which provides housing for migrants en route to the U.S. AI specified that, since the massacre in San Fernando, hundreds of other men, women, and children who sought to reach the United States via Mexico have been harassed, disappeared, kidnapped, raped, forced into sexual slavery, and massacred.

For more information (in Spanish):

La historia de la 72: Un mensaje de esperanza frente a masacres de migrantes (VICE, 25 de agosto de 2015)

Masacre en San Fernando: lo que la PGR le oculta a las familias (Proceso, 22 de agosto de 2015)

A 5 años de masacre de 72 migrantes en San Fernando, caso sigue impune: Amnistía Internacional (Animal Político, 22 de agosto de 2015)

Falta de justicia a cinco años de una masacre convierte a México en una ‘zona de riesgo’ para migrantes (Amnistía Internacional, 21 de agosto de 2015)

Denuncia Amnistía impunidad a cinco años de la masacre de San Fernando (Proceso, 21 de agosto de 2015)

For more information from SIPAZ (in English):

National: Four years after the massacre of San Fernando, “La 72” denounces new operations against migrants (2 September 2014)


Guerrero: Tlachinollan dedicates its XXI activity report to parents of the disappeared from Ayotzinapa

September 11, 2015

imagenTlachiInformeOn Saturday 29 August, with the participation of some 3000 persons, the Tlachinollan Mountain Center for Human Rights celebrated its XXI anniversary in the city of Tlapa de Comonfort, Guerrero. Tlachinollan dedicated its activity report, entitled From the Trenches of Ayotzinapa, the Defense of Education and the Lives of the Children of the People, to the mothers and fathers of the 43 disappeared students from the Isidro Burgos Rural Normal School of Ayotzinapa. Due to the events of 26 September 2014, “we left aside being just an office of lawyers and accompaniers to fully join the struggle of this exemplary movement,” said dijo Abel Barrera, director of Tlachinollan. He spoke of a movement that has “unmasked the reality of this country in which the military, parties, and firms collude with organized crime.”

Beyond this, he denounced that there exists a systematic pattern of attacks on the rural normal schools, particularly Ayotzinapa, and that, nearly a year after the acts, not one legal case has been initiated due to the forcible disappeared, nor has the possible responsibility of the 27th Infantry Batallion of Iguala for the crimes, which also included six other executions and torture. The representative of the UN High Commissioner’s Office in Mexico for Human Rights, Jesús Peña Palacios, indicated that “the State should never stop seeking out the disappeared until they are found.” A father of one of the 43 disappeared, Mario César González, also participated, saying that not knowing where his son causes him great despair, and that it is a sort of pain he would not wish anyone else to experience. The event ended with a march for the Ayotzinapa case toward the center of Tlapa, where a rally was held that incorporated the participation of many people.

For more information (in Spanish):

Desnuda Ayotzinapa “patrón de ataque a normales rurales” (La Jornada, 29 de agosto de 2015)

De ¡Eureka! a Tlachinollan (Carlos Fazio en La Jornada, 31 de agosto de 2015)

XXI_Informe_Tlachinollan  (agosto de 2015)

El Estado nunca debe de dejar la búsqueda de un desaparecido, dice representante de la ONU en Tlapa (El Sur de Acapulco, 30 de agosto de 2015)


National/International: Army and security forces involved in extrajudicial executions, torture, and forcible disappearances: US State Department

July 21, 2015

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The U.S. State Department has released its annual report on the human-rights situation in Mexico. It indicated that, in 2014, the Mexican Army and security forces were involved in forcible disappearances and murder, as in the cases of the 43 disappeared youth from Ayotzinapa and the 22 civilians killed in Tlatlaya. In this sense, the report notes that “significant problems related to human rights include the police and military due to their involvement in serious abuses, such as extrajudicial murders, torture, forcible disappearances, and physical abuse.” Furthermore, the report shared the conclusions come to by Juan Méndez, the United Nations Special Rapporteur, who denounced that these crimes are the consequence of the various irregularities that exist within the Mexican judicial system. “Impunity and corruption continue to be serious problems, particularly at the state and local levels, in the armed forces, and the judiciary,” the report notes. With reference to organized crime, it mentions that “organized-crime groups are also responsible for numerous murders, frequently acting with impunity and in alliance with corrupt state, local, and federal security officials.”

With respect to the Tlatlaya case in Mexico State, which took place on 30 June 2014, the report reviewed the confrontation between civilians and soldiers in which “22 individuals were killed under suspicious circumstances, some of them after having surrendered.” With regard to the forcible disappearance of the 43 students from the Rural Normal School of Ayotzinapa, the report sustained the conclusions which the Federal Attorney General’s Office had come to, maintaining the charges against the mayor of Iguala, José Luis Abarca, and his wife, who were directly accused of responsibility for the disappearance of the students.

Beyond this, State highlighted other serious human-rights problems in Mexico, including the lamentable conditions in prisons and arbitrary arrests. In addition, the State report mentioned the death-threats and violence directed against human-rights defenders and journalists, abuse against migrants, domestic violence, human trafficking, abuse against people with disabilities, social and economic discrimination against the indigenous population, the exploitation of child labor, and attacks and threats against the gay community.

It should be mentioned that the conclusions of the report will serve as evidence for the U.S. Congress to consider when reviewing the amount of economic assistance to be granted next year to Mexico.

For more information (in Spanish):

Informe del Departamento de Estado de Estados Unidos en materia de Derechos Humanos 2014, versión en inglés: Mexico 2014 Human Rights Report

Ejército y fuerzas de seguridad de México, involucradas en asesinatos y desaparición de personas: EU (Proceso, 25 de junio de 2015)

Unilateral informe de EU sobre derechos humanos, responde Gobierno de México (Aristegui Noticias, 27 de junio de 2015)

Impunidad y corrupción son “problemas serios” en México, advierte EU(CNN México, 25 de junio de 2015)


National/Chiapas/Oaxaca/Tabasco: Founding of the Collective of Defenders of Migrants and Refugees (CODEMIRE)

April 23, 2015

Conformación Codemire (@izq.mx)

CODEMIRE Group (@izq.mx)

In an 8 April press-conference, there was announced the founding of the Collective of Defenders of Migrants and Refugees (CODEMIRE), comprised of 28 migrant homes located in southern, centrla, and northern Mexico.  Members of the new grouping expressed their rejection of the Southern Border Plan, launched by President Enrique Peña Nieto in July 2014, considering it to have contributed to greater human-rights violations against the migrants who cross through Mexico toward the United States.  They added that in comparison with 2013, there was a 47% increase int he number of arrests in 2014–not just on the border, but also aboard buses, on highways, and on freight-trains, among other locations.  They stressed that migrants’ vulnerability has not declined, for they face multiple challenges: extortion by the police, agents from the National Migration Institute (INM), the Navy, and the Army; kidnapping, disappearance, rape, and assault from organized-rime groups “that have found more fertile land after this plan was implemented.”

The members of the new collective have announced that they will unify their efforts toward the end of attending to and defending migrants transiting through the country, and protecting the rights-defenders of this populace who are threatened with death, criminalized, and persecuted for carrying out their work.

They called on the Mexican State to observe its obligation of providing security and protection to migrants; to cease the operations of migratory verification which imperil life, physical integrity, and human rights; to suspend the Southern Border Plan; and never to allow a plan of this magnitude to be implemented again without social scrutiny.

For more information (in Spanish):

Crean red de albergues y casas para desplazados (La Jornada, 9 de abril de 2015)

Defensores de migrantes en México rechazan Plan Frontera Sur (Chiapas Paralelo, 9 de abril de 2015)

Organizaciones exigen la cancelación del programa Frontera Sur, por “poner en riesgo” a migrantes (Emeequis, 8 de abril de 2015)

Fore more information from SIPAZ (in English):

Mexico/National: Honduran migrant dies of drowning in presence of INM agents, says La 72 (22 March 2015)

Mexico/Tabasco: INM agent’s legal demand against Fray Tomás González(13 November 2014)

Mexico/Chiapas: Caravan of Central American Mothers, “Bridges of Hope,” in San Cristóbal (16 December 2014)

National/Chiapas: Massive raids against migrants and attack on human-rights defenders (3 May 2014)