National: Activist Rosario Piedra Ibarra is elected new president of the CNDH

November 11, 2019
medalla_belisario_rosario_ibarra-7-e1573161168619

@Cuartopoder

On November 7, the Senate elected the new head of the National Human Rights Commission (CNDH). With 76 out of 114 votes cast in her favor, Rosario Piedra Ibarra, human rights activist and daughter of the founder of the Eureka! Committee, an organization of mothers and relatives of the disappeared, was elected as the new ombudsman, while candidates Arturo Peimbert Calvo and José de Jesús Orozco Henríquez received 24 and 8 votes respectively.

After the vote, members of the National Action Party (PAN) denounced that in reality 116 instead of 114 legislators voted and that there was fraud in the process. “We demand the annulment of the vote to elect the incumbent of the @CNDH. [. . . ] We cannot allow FRAUD to be done in the Senate of the Republic”, Martha Márquez of the PAN reported on Twitter. It should be noted that the only people empowered to count votes are the secretaries of the Board of Directors of the Chamber where the PAN is represented by one secretary.

PAN senators also criticized that Rosario Piedra Ibarra was a candidate for federal congresswoman for Morena: “Today Morena did not vote in favor of the Mexicans, they voted for a president of the @CNDH who will act under the command of the President”.

I am never going to submit to a partisan idea that would be contrary to what is in my own conscience“, emphasized the new president of the CNDH before the accusations. She also stated that she wants to prevent the CNDH from becoming a instance of “simulation” with the promise of putting herself “in the shoes of the victims”.

On voting day she announced on her Twitter account: “A new period for human rights begins today. I heartily thank the people who place their trust in me and rest assured that I will work the same way I have for over 40 years. May this achievement be for all of us.”

For more information:

Rosario Piedra Ibarra en Twitter (November 7, 2019)

Rosario Piedra hace historia: Es la primera luchadora social que llega a la Presidencia de la CNDH (SinEmbargo November 7, 2019)

Oposición acusa fraude en elección de titular de CNDH; es un trámite concluido, dice Morena (Animal Político November 7, 2019)

For more information from SIPAZ:

National: CNDH Demands Clarification of Crimes against Journalists in Mexico – 90% Remain in Impunity (November 8, 2019)

National/International: UNO Presents Diagnostic of Protection Mechanism of Human Rights Defenders and Journalists (September 2, 2019)

Oaxaca: Founder and Director of Community Radio Murdered. Tenth Journalist Murdered under AMLO Government (May 10, 2019)

 


National: Yaqui leader Mario Luna is released and declared innocent

October 8, 2015

Fernando Jiménez y Mario Luna, representantes del pueblo yaqui. Foto @ Benjamín FloresFernando Jiménez and Mario Luna, representatives of the Yaqui people. Photo @
Benjamín Flores

On 23 September, Mario Luna Delgado, leader of the Yaqui people, was released from prison no. 2 in Hermosillo, Sonora, after having been imprisoned since 11 September 2014. His release was expedited by the fact that the corresponding judge found no evidence supporting the charges against him: that is, kidnapping and robbery of a vehicle. Mario Luna had led protests and organized roadblocks in the community of Vícam against the extraction of water from the dam system on the Yaqui River, which was to be transferred to the city of Hermosillo. Luna opposes the construction of the Independence Aqueduct.

This release took place 10 days before the departure of Guillermo Padrés Elías as governor of Sonora state, who is to be replaced by a representative of the National Action Party (PAN).

It bears mentioning that Fernando Jiménez, another of the leaders of the Yaqui nation, had been released on 28 August, after a Yaqui committee together with representatives from Amnesty International submitted a petition with 15,000 signatures to the Secretary of Governance demanding the release of the detained and the application of due process in both cases.

For more information (in Spanish):

Tras un año preso, declaran inocente al líder yaqui Mario Luna (Proceso, 23 de septiembre de 2015)

Liberan al líder yaqui Mario Luna (La Jornada, 23 de septiembre de 2015)

Dejan en libertad a Mario Luna (El Imparcial, 23 de septiembre de 2015)

For more information from SIPAZ (in English):

Chiapas/Nacional: Caravan from Yaqui Nation in defense of water arrives in San Cristóbal (17 May 2015)

Chiapas/National: CNI and EZLN express solidarity with Yaquis of Sonora against the looting of water (21 July 2013)

National/Chiapas: CNI and General Command of the EZLN demand release of Mario Luna (16 September 2014)


Mexico: Final results of the 2015 midterm elections

June 25, 2015

(@Portico online)

(@Portico online)

On Sunday, June 7, 2015, more than 83 million Mexicans voted for 1,996 public offices, including 9 governorships, 500 federal deputies, and hundreds of local offices in different states of the Republic.

A week after the elections, upon finalizing the calculation of votes, the National Electoral Institute (INE) reported that the deputies chosen by direct votes and proportional representation within the Chamber of Deputies would include 203 seats for the PRI (which will retain the majority vote), 108 for the PAN, 56 for PRD, 47 for the Green Ecologist Party (PVEM), 35 for MORENA, 26 for the Citizens’ Movement, 8 for Social Encounter, 10 for New Alliance (PANAL), and 6 for the Labor Party (PT). 41% of the offices will be held by women.

The election registered a participation of 47.72% of eligible voters, while the percentage of blank votes reached 4.76% of the total.

For more information (in Spanish):

¿Cuántos legisladores tendrá cada partido en la Cámara de Diputados? (Animal Político, 14 de junio de 2015)

INE confirma resultados para diputados federales; PRI obtuvo más de 11 milliones de votos (Sdp Noticias, 14 de junio de 2015)

PRI será mayoría en San Lazaro; finaliza el conteo (El Universal, 14 de junio de 2015)

Ganadores de las elecciones del 7 de junio del 2015 (El Economista, 15 de junio de 2015)

For more information from SIPAZ (in English):

Guerrero: PRI wins elections within violent context (25 June 2015)

Chiapas: abstentionism and blank votes “win” in midterm elections (25 June 2015)

Oaxaca: Violent election day: 440 incidents, 92 arrests, injured, disappeared, and one killed (25 June 2015)


Guerrero: PRI wins elections within violent context

June 25, 2015

150607-Policia-Federal-invade-col-Tepeyac-Tlapa

Federal police invade Tepeyac community, Tlapa. Photo @Tlachinollan

With a margin of 41%, the preliminary results of the Guerrero State elections place the PRI-PVEM candidate, Héctor Astudillo Flores, as the winner. Astudillo gained 465 mil 263 votes, 7% more than his most popular rival, the PRD-PT candidate, Beatriz Mojica Morga. The candidate for the Citizens’ Movement (MC), Luis Walton Aburto, took third place, with 91,651 votes. Beyond these, comes the National Action Party candidate (PAN), Jorge Camacho Peñaloza (58,005 votes); the MORENA candidate, Pablo Amílcar Sandoval (30,355 votes), and the New Alliance Party (PANAL), Karime Sevilla (19,625 votes).

In the mayorships, the PRI took 36, the PRD 24, the MC 7, the PAN 4, and the PT and PVEM 2 each, with PANAL taking 1. According to these results, the PRI will retake control of Acapulco, Iguala, and Tixtla, and it will maintain power in Chilpancingo, Taxco, and Chilapa, while the PRD will continue to govern in Zihuatanejo and Cocula, and it will recover Ayutla and Metlatónoc.

On election day, the process took place within a violent context in many parts of the state. In Tlapa de Comonfort, police and soldiers attacked citizens (including two women and a girl) who had kidnapped federal officials, whom they wanted to exchange for 9 imprisoned teachers. The group was arrested by the authorities at the headquarters of the State Coordination of Educational Workers of Guerrero (CETEG) and one house in particular. Abel Barrera, director of the Tlachinollan Mountain Center for Human Rights, arrived to the site to mediate a dialogue and interchange between the arrested teachers, who had been transferred by helicopter to Mexico City, and the federal officials. Barrera reported that the Secretary for Governance had accepted the exchange, but that the teachers would be handed over in Chilpancingo. Nonetheless, at night, federal police fired tear gas and live ammunition at the citizenry to disperse them. One youth died by gunfire for this reason.

Tlachinollan has demanded that the security forces that participated in this attack be investigated and sanctioned. The Agustín Pro Juárez Center for Human Rights published an Urgent Action on 8 June that demands that federal and state authorities “guarantee the security of the people of Tlapa and of the people arrested by the federal police at the CETEG offices,” beyond “carrying out an independent investigation,” among other things. Crescenciano Gallardo Sánchez, spokesperson for the CETEG in the Costa Grande, observed that “whoever wins the election, the protests carried out by social organizations in the state will continue, to demand the return with life of the 43 students of the Raúl Isidro Burgos Rural Normal School of Ayotzinapa, who were forcibly disappeared on 26 September of last year in Iguala, as well as to demand the release of all political prisoners, especially the communal leader Nestora Salgado García.

A day before the elections were held, Saturday 6 June, there was a confrontation involving members of the United Front for Security and Social Development in Guerrero (FUSDEG) in a rural zone of the Acapulco municipality which left 16 dead and an unspecified number of injured. Nonetheless, the mayor, Luis Uruñuela, expressed that the events do not have to do with the elections, and he claimed that the State Attorney General would investigate the incident.

For more information (in Spanish):

Cómputo del Prep coloca a Astudillo Flores como ganador de la elección (La Jornada de Guerrero, 9 de junio de 2015)

Federales y militares disparan contra civiles en Tlapa; reportan un muerto (La Jornada de Guerrero, 7 de junio de 2015)

Policía ingresa a Tlapa y rescata a federales retenidos; confirman muerte de una persona (Sin Embargo, 7 de junio de 2015)

Gobierno estatal rompió la negociación antes de operativo en Tlapa, denuncian (Centro ProDH, 9 de junio de 2015)

Lamenta el alcalde el enfrentamiento del Fusdeg en Xolapa que dejó 16 muertos (La Jornada de Guerrero, 8 de junio de 2015)

Se proclama vencedor Héctor Astudillo con ventaja de 14 puntos sobre Mojica (La Jornada de Guerrero, 8 de junio de 2015)

Gane quien gane la elección, seguirán las protestas de organizaciones: Ceteg (La Jornada de Guerrero, 8 de junio de 2015)

ACCIÓN URGENTE (Tlachinollan, 7 de junio de 2015)

ACCIÓN URGENTE (Centro de DDHH Pro Juárez)

For more information from SIPAZ (in English):

Guerrero/National: 8 months after the forcible disappearance of the 43 students from the Rural Normal School of Ayotzinapa, there is no progress (9 June 2015)

Guerrero/International: Eurocaravan for Ayotzinapa prohibited from protesting in front of Mexican embassy in Spain (7 June 2015)

Guerrero: Ayotzinapa – seven months of impunity and struggling for justice (3 May 2015)


National: Broad societal rejection of the General Law on Water leads to its tabling

March 21, 2015

(@fan.mexico.net)

(@fan.mexico.net)

On 5 March, deputies from the Institutional Revolutionary Party (PRI), the National Action Party (PAN), and the Green-Ecologist Party of Mexico (PVEM) approved the General Law on Water in committee.  Among the controversial points stipulated by this law is the privatization of the provision and construction of water infrastructure throughout the country, a move that is made with the supposed “public interest” in mind, as well as the participation of finance-capitalists and private entities that would replace the public service, in addition to the regulation of water use for hydraulic fracturing (fracking).

Legislators in opposition have indicated that the law has been passed only to grant immunity to the firms that already exploit large amounts of water, such as Coca Cola and Nestlé.  The PRD deputy Aleida Alavez Ruiz indicated that it is a “shadily” edited law, given that it claims to defend the human right to water, but then succumbs to a commercial view of the vital substance, as it would impose taxes on all forms of its consumption and eliminate the subsidies that support thousands of families.

In a pronunciation, more than 5,000 persons and 1,000 scientists rejected the Law in question (also known as the “Korenfeld Law”), and they have called on society to mobilize itself when the proposal comes up for consideration again.  The document challenges the adoption of  “a model of management that has proven to be unsustainable, and that now favors more the commercialization of water toward a burgeoning in private enterprise in the realm of infrastructure and services.”  It is stressed also that the initiative omits completely the right to health and freedom from pollution, as “the impunity to pollute lives on,” and “concessions of huge hydraulic works are being promoted which use massive amounts of energy, thus contributing to global warming.”

On 9 March, Manlio Fabio Beltrones, the parliamentary coordinator for the PRI, reported that the Council on Political Coordination of the Congress had agreed to postpone discussion of the new law so as to provide “the time that is necessary to clarify the questions and information” in such matters.

On 10 March, however, civil organizations and hundreds of persons held a forum outside the Congres to protest what they see as the “privatization” of water.

For more information (in Spanish):

Posicionamiento de la Generación de candidatos a Doctores en Ciencias Sociales (2015-2019) de la UAM – Xochimilco

Avalan diputados dictamen que facilita la privatización del agua (La Jornada, 5 de marzo de 2015)

Coca Cola y Nestlé están entre las grandes beneficiarias de la nueva Ley del agua (Sin Embargo, 9 de marzo de 2015)

OSC y más de 5 mil personas demandan desechar la iniciativa de Ley General de Aguas (Pronunciamiento, 9 de marzo de 2015)

Diputados frenan “el tiempo que sea necesario” la Ley de Aguas, tras las protestas (Sin Embargo, 9 de marzo de 2015)

Ley de aguas afecta a millones para beneficiar a la insustria, acusa protesta en San Lázaro (Sin Embargo, 10 de marzo de 2015)

Repudio Social contra la ley general de aguas (La Jornada, 11 de marzo de 2015)


National: approval of law on social movement that some have characterized as an “anti-protest law”

December 17, 2014

Movilización en la Ciudad de México, 20 de noviembre de 2014 (@SIPAZ)

Mobilization in Mexico City, 20 November 2014 (@SIPAZ)

On 2 December, deputies from the PRI, PAN, PVEM, and PANAL parties approved a bill on “social movement,” or constitutional changes that some NGOs and analysts worry could allow the authorities to suppress protests and more broadly restrict freedom of expression, reunion, and petition.  This comes within the context of multitudinous mobilizations against the government of Enrique Peña Nieto over the case of the disappeared 43 normalist students from Ayotzinapa.

Some PRD, PT, and Citizens’ Movement legislators have qualified this bill as an “anti-protest law.”  Yet it still was approved 292 to 100, and thus will proceed to the Senate.  Once approved by the Senate, it must be approved by at least 17 state congresses.

Those comprising the front for the Liberty of Expression and Social Protest and Greenpeace Mexico have made an energetic call on the federal congress to avoid instituting any disposition that would seek to restrict the rights to freedom of expression, meeting, and association.  These groups indicated that it is alarming that the reform take place “within a context of enormous social discontent and public mobilizations against which public force has used disproportionate force, leading to violations of the freedom of expression, meeting, social protest, and even health.”  It is for these reasons that the General Law on Movement may seek to further restrict the right to social protest.

For more information (in Spanish):

Aprueban diputados ley antimarchas en medio de protestas por Ayotzinapa (Proceso, 2 de diciembre de 2014)

PRI y PAN buscan aprobar reforma que reglamente las manifestaciones(La Jornada, 3 de diciembre de 2014)

 ¿Ley antimarchas? Puntos clave de lo aprobado por diputados (Aristegui Noticias, 3 de diciembre de 2014)

El PRD condena Ley Antimarchas, pero en el DF la impulsa, acusan activistas (Sin Embargo 4 de diciembre de 2014)

ONG se declaran en alerta por eventuales intentos de cercar la libertad de expresión (La Jornada, 4 de diciembre de 2014)

For more information from SIPAZ (in English):

Chiapas: State congress approves initiative on “legitimate use of force” (18 May 2014)

National: Creation of the Front for the Freedom of Expression and Social Protest (26 April 2014)


National: 10 points from EPN regarding security, and first reactions

December 15, 2014

Enrique Peña Nieto (@Wikipedia)

Enrique Peña Nieto (@Wikipedia)

On 27 November, a day after 2 months had passed since the forcible disappearance of 43 normalist students in Iguala, Guerrero, President Enrique Peña Nieto publicly announced 10 actions to be taken in terms of public security, as well as in prosecution the administration of justice.  These measures include the following:

1. To submit on 1 December a bill against the Infiltration of Organized Crime in the municipal authorities which would allow the federal government to take control of security in municipalities where there are indications of collusion between local authorities and organized crime.

2. An initiative to redefine the competence of each authority with regard to fighting crime.

3. The obligatory creation of state police that will substitute the “more than 1,800 weak municipal police.”

4. A national number for emergencies: 911.

5. A single identification card.

6. A special federal force located in the region of Tierra Caliente that would cover municipalities in Guerrero and Michoacán.

7. A solution for justice “that too often is slow, complex, and costly.”

8. Different actions in terms of human rights that include the following: provide Congress with the ability to expedite the general laws on torture and forcible disappearance; strengthening the protocols and proceedings in cases of torture, forcible disappearance, and extrajudicial executions; creation of a national system to search for disappeared persons, as well as a national genetic information database, and the entrance into law of a General Law on Victims.

9. Support from the federal executive for the National Anti-Corruption System and the Regulatory Law for Constitutional Reforms in terms of transparency that is being discussed in the federal congress.

10. Transparency, accountability, and popular participation.

Beyond the ten points, EPN announced a strategy “for comprehensive development to reduce poverty,marginalization, and inequality in Chiapas, Guerrero, and Oaxaca.”

In reaction, the parliamentary groups of the Party for Democratic Revolution (PRD) and the National Action Party (PAN) lamented that the federal executive had not engaged in self-criticism in its transfer of responsibility to the local level, or even really provided a truthful diagnostic of the crisis in the country.

With regards to this latter point, human-rights organizations and victims’ groups denounced that the attention provided to the serious problem of forcible disappearances continues being inadequate.  They recalled that this is not the first time that the present government announces search plans and actions, with no results to date.  They lamented that there has not been any progress in terms of consultation for the construction of the proposal with those who for year have denounced the exponential increase in the number of disappearances in Mexico.   These groups warned furthermore that a large part of the measures that were announced correspond to the legislative branch, and so do not imply immediate actions that would help advance the investigations of thousands of cases of forcible disappearances that have been denounced in recent years.  Specifically, they affirmed that “we consider that, amidst the magnitude of the crisis of disappearances, it is reproachable that the central message today would not be recognition of the magnitude of this crisis but would instead omit immediate and urgent measures to be taken in terms of justice to guarantee that in all cases of disappearances that have been denounced, justice and truth prevail […].  We lament that today, two months following the forced disappearance of the 43 normalist students from Ayotzinapa, the president has not revealed any concrete actions to deepen the search for the students, whose whereabouts still to date has not been clarified using scientific evidence.  Neither has there been any pivot to the parents who have experienced rage and negation since 26 and 27 September 2014, amidst the promises of those who to date still have yet to observe them.”

For more information (in Spanish):

Estos son los 10 puntos que anunció Peña Nieto en respuesta al caso Ayotzinapa (Animal Político, 28 de noviembre de 2014)

Presenta Peña Nieto nuevo plan de justicia (27 de noviembre de 2014)

Propuesta de 10 puntos de EPN confronta a bancadas en el Senado (La Jornada, 27 de noviembre de 2014)

Propone PRD ampliar decálogo de Peña; “insuficiente” el punto de la corrupción, dice (Proceso, 27 de noviembre de 2014)

Comunicado completo de las OSC (27 de noviembre de 2014)

Ante crisis son insuficientes medidas anunciadas por EPN: derechohumanistas (Radio Fórmula, 28 de noviembre de 2014)