Guerrero/National: Incoming Government Confirms Creation of Truth Commission for Ayotzinapa Case

August 13, 2018

ayotzi(@SIPAZ Archive)

On August 1st, Alejandro Encinas Rodriguez, the next deputy secretary of Human Rights of the Ministry of the Interior, reported that he met with the parents of the 43 students of the Normal Rural School of Ayotzinapa, who disappeared in Guerrero in September 2014, to whom he endorsed the commitment to create a truth commission. He argued before media that the truth commission has constitutional bases and announced that others will be set up, even of a regional nature, to address the problem of disappearances in the country. He explained that if the ruling of the second unitary court in Tamaulipas last June is not met, it will be agreed directly with the parents of the missing student teachers so that the Commission becomes a reality.

He asserted that, “it is a matter of political will, not just of a judicial nature. There is political will and there will be a commission.” In addition to revealing that “we will evaluate each of the problems; all cases will be seen to. They can be regional, thematic commissions, on specific cases. We will analyze each issue in a particular way.”

For more information in Spanish:

Sí habrá comisión de la verdad para Ayotzinapa, afirma Alejandro Encinas (La Jornada, 2 de agosto de 2018)

Alista próximo gobierno Comisión de la Verdad para caso Ayotzinapa (MVS Noticias, 1 de agosto de 2018)

Encinas promete a padres de normalistas de Ayotzinapa encontrar la verdad (SDP Noticias, 1 de agosto de 2018)

El equipo de AMLO alista la comisión de la verdad por el caso Ayotzinapa (ADN Político, 1 de agosto de 2018)

For more information from SIPAZ:

Guerrero/Nacional : Denuncian obstrucción hacia la conformación de una comisión de la Verdad en el caso Ayotzinapa (30 de julio de 2018)

Guerrero: Graduaron los compañeros de los 43 estudiantes de Ayotzinapa (16 de julio de 2018)

Guerrero/Nacional : CNDH informa que se tiene a un preso inocente por el caso Ayotzinapa (22 de junio de 2018)

Guerrero/Nacional/Internacional : Llamados a redigirir investigación en el caso Ayotzinapa (14 de junio de 2018)

Guerrero/Nacional: Tribunal Federal ordena la creación de una Comisión de la Verdad para reponer la investigación en el caso Ayotzinapa(6 de junio de 2018)

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Mexico: 5 years since the massacre of 72 migrants in San Fernando, Tamaulipas

September 11, 2015

La 72 Hogar Refugio Para Personas Migrantes @VICE “La 72,” Refuge Home for Migrants @VICE

Five years ago, on 23 August 2010, 72 bodies of migrants appeared in San Fernando, Tamaulipas. 58 men and 14 women, principally from Central and South America, were kidnapped and executed in a ranch in San Fernando, close to the border with Texas. The indignation over the case was immediate. San Fernando recalled all those who are made invisible during their passage through Mexico in search of a new life. Since that time, the authorities have arrested a number of individuals but have not published information regarding whether anyone has been sentenced. Amnesty International (AI) has warned that the lack of investigation in the case “gives a green light to the criminal groups that terrorize and murder those who cross Mexico in search of security and a better life.” AI also hypothesizes that those responsible belong to criminal gangs, and it suspects that many of these worked in collusion with local security agents.

In Tenosique, Tabasco, the year after these events transpired, in honor of the 72 victims, there was founded the “72 Refuge Home for Migrants,” which provides housing for migrants en route to the U.S. AI specified that, since the massacre in San Fernando, hundreds of other men, women, and children who sought to reach the United States via Mexico have been harassed, disappeared, kidnapped, raped, forced into sexual slavery, and massacred.

For more information (in Spanish):

La historia de la 72: Un mensaje de esperanza frente a masacres de migrantes (VICE, 25 de agosto de 2015)

Masacre en San Fernando: lo que la PGR le oculta a las familias (Proceso, 22 de agosto de 2015)

A 5 años de masacre de 72 migrantes en San Fernando, caso sigue impune: Amnistía Internacional (Animal Político, 22 de agosto de 2015)

Falta de justicia a cinco años de una masacre convierte a México en una ‘zona de riesgo’ para migrantes (Amnistía Internacional, 21 de agosto de 2015)

Denuncia Amnistía impunidad a cinco años de la masacre de San Fernando (Proceso, 21 de agosto de 2015)

For more information from SIPAZ (in English):

National: Four years after the massacre of San Fernando, “La 72” denounces new operations against migrants (2 September 2014)


National: Four years after the San Fernando massacre, “La 72” denounces new operations against migrants

September 2, 2014

Albergue "La 72", Tenosique (@SIPAZ)Migrant Home “La 72″, Tenosique (@SIPAZ)

At the end of August, there was a commemoration held of the four years since the San Fernando massacre (August 2010), which took place in Tamaulipas. A group of armed persons belonging to the Zetas cartel kidnapped and murdered 72 migrants (58 men and 14 women), most of them originally from Central or South America. It is suppsoed that the kidnapped migrants were executed because they did not pay extortion fees and refused to join the criminal group. In Tenosique, Tabasco, the following year, to commemorate the 72 who were murdered, the “La 72” Migrant Home was established, being a center that offers hospitality and rest to migrants en route to the United States.

Members of “La 72” denounced that on 12 August, the National Institute on Migration (INM) and the federal police carried out an operation at the Tenosique station against migrants who had crossed into Mexico through the Tabasco border. Once the train arrived, “72” staff report that approximately 20 federal police and 10 INM agents “attacked many verbally and others were followed on the train tracks,” adding that that a half hour later, they saw INM patrols full of “arrested” migrants in the cabs. In light of this incident, the staff of “La 72” declared that “we newly repudiate the return by the INM and federal police to these sorts of detention operations, since rather than provide security to migrants, they expose fleeing migrants to risk of mutilation and death by passing trains. The so-called ‘rescues’ of migrants that the INM likes to say it carried out are in reality bold persecutions in which there is extreme verbal and psychological violence.” Furthermore, they stressed that in the INM operations the Beta group had also participated, having changed from its previous role of “protector of migrants […] into a type of intelligence [agency] for the INM delegation in Tabasco.”

On 15 August, Fray Tomás González Castillo, director of “La 72,” declared that a permanent operation had been activated in Tenosique, and he denounced the attempt by the INM (with assistance from the federal police) to dismantle the refuge by means of “comfort” operations in the migrants’ home and in the city, instead of targeting areas in which criminal groups act. These operations are “comfortable,” says Fray Tomás, because “the INM does not carry out its operations in rural areas, there where the human-traffickers are capturing migrants. These are practically the bases on which the groups work with impunity to ‘cross’ Central Americans from Guatemala to Mexico.”

For more information (in Spanish):

Alerta urgente: Operativos INM y PF en Tenosique (“La 72″, 13 de agosto de 2014)

Federales y Migración aniquilarán refugio La 72 (Proyecto Ambulante, 18 de agosto de 2014)

De la fosa clandestina a la fosa común (Chiapas Paralelo, 25 de agosto de 2014)

Impunidad, a cuatro años de la masacre de San Fernando (Red Política, 25 de agosto de 2014)

For more information from SIPAZ (in English):

National/Chiapas: Massive raids against migrants and attack on human-rights defenders (3 May 2014)

National: Migrant pilgrimage arrives in Mexico City (2 May 2014)

Chiapas: March from Suchiate river to denounce abuses against migrants, and beginning of hunger strike (29 April 2013)


National: Harassment of home of director of Article 19 shortly before publication of report “Dissent in silence: violence against the press and criminalization of protest, Mexico 2013”

March 28, 2014

Darío Ramírez (@Desinformémonos)

Darío Ramírez (@Desinformémonos)

On 16 March, the home of the General Director of the Mexico and Central American Office of Article 19 belonging to Darío Ramírez was harassed.  Work documents as well as other valued objects and computers were stolen, according to a denunciation submitted to the Attorney General’s Office of Mexico City (PGJDF).  The press release distributed by Article 19 after the act stressed that this is “the fifth security incident that personnel from the organization have faced […] since April 2013.”  Beyond this, the acts took place two days before the organization released its report “Dissent in Silence: Violence against the press and criminalization of protest, Mexico 2013.”  In this sense, the bulletin expressed that “we are concerned that the harassment of the home would be a message of intimidation for those who seek to inhibit our work in favor of freedom of expression.”

On 18 March, however, there was held an event to present the 2013 report as planned, which indicates that each 26.5 hours a journalist is attacked in Mexico.  In 2013, Article 19 documented 330 aggressions against journalists and media institutions (59% more than in 2012), including 59 against women.  These statistics are the highest since 2007, though in 2013 five journalists died, two fewer than in 2012.  More than 60 attacks on journalists took place during protests, in a way that the report indicates as showing the “authorities choosing for the path of repression and direct confrontation.”  In 59.3% of the cases, a public official has been responsible.  Although the problem revolves around states already noted in the country (such as Veracruz, Chihuahua, Coahuila, and Tamaulipas), Article 19 notes that the documented attacks allow one to see a “pattern of dissemination toward other states” such as, for example, Mexico City, Oaxaca, Michoacán, Guerrero, Tlaxcala, Baja California, and Zacatecas.

For more information (in Spanish):

Funcionarios públicos y crimen organizado, principales agresores de periodistas (Analisis Centro Prodh, 19 de marzo de 2014)

2013, el año más violento para la prensa en México: Artículo 19 (Animal político, 18 de marzo de 2014)

Primer año de Peña, el más violento para la prensa desde 2007: Artículo 19(Proceso, 18 de marzo de 2014)

Informe completo 2013 (Artículo 19, 18 de marzo de 2014)

Allanan la casa del Director de Artículo 19; solicita protección (Aristegui Noticias, 18 de marzo de 2014)

Comunicado de Artículo 19 (Artículo 19, 17 de marzo de 2014)

For more information from SIPAZ (in English):

National: Article 19 receives death-threats (23 April 2013)


National: Thousands of teachers march against the educational reform

October 4, 2013

DSCF1389

Sit-in of teachers in Tuxtla Gutiérrez, Chiapas. Photo @SIPAZ

On 11 September, dissident teachers from several Mexican states (Aguascalientes, Baja California, Chiapas, Durango, Guerrero, Jalisco, Michoacán, Morelos, Nayarit, Oaxaca, Querétaro, Tamaulipas, Tlaxcala, Yucatán, and Veracruz) joined the protests organized by the National Coordination of Educational Workers (CNTE), which marched starting at 10am in Mexico City toward Los Pinos.  The Secretary for Public Education that day distributed the decrees which are to reform the General Law on Education demanding the expeditious institution of the laws recommended by the National Institute for the Evaluation of Education and the General Union of Professional Teaching Services, which entered in law on 12 September.

In Guerrero, some 5000 teachers from the State Coordination of State Educational Workers (CETEG) marched on the Sol Highway to protest the educational reform and its secondary laws.  In the protest participated teachers from the central and mountainous regions of Guerrero, principally, who went on strike in response to the call for mobilization on the part of the CNTE.

In Oaxaca, the Unions of Workers from the “Benito Juárez” Autonomous University of Oaxaca (STEUABJO) and of Educational Workers from the Oaxaca State Conalep (SUTDCEO) held a 12-hour strike to observe the national general strike called for by the CNTE.  Similarly, the Unified Front for Struggle (FUL) and the Popular Assembly of the Peoples of Oaxaca (APPO), teaching students, and retired teachers participated in marches, occupations of buses, and blockades of the TV Azteca office, preventing the exit of dozens of workers.

In Tuxtla Gutiérrez, Chiapas, approximately 1,500 teachers from Sections 7 and 40 marched, closing the four access-routes to the capital during the entirety of the day.  15 days after having begun the mobilizations and protest actions against educational reform, the teachers on that day added to their demand a rejection of the fiscal and energy reforms, in parallel terms to social organizations and campesinos.  By means of social networks and text messages, on 10 September there began a calumnious campaign in the media opposed to the teachers’ movement in Chiapas.

For more information (in Spanish):

Maestros de Guerrero marchan sobre Autopista del Sol (Informador, 12 de septiembre de 2013)

Maestros preparan megamarcha en Guerrero (La Prensa, 11 de septiembre de 2013)

Marchan maestros en los estados contra la Reforma Educativa (Excelsior, 11 de septiembre de 2013)

Protestan profesores en 17 estados en apoyo a la CNTE (Animal Político, 11 de septiembre de 2013)

Marchan Ceteg y MPG contra las reformas educativa y energética (La Jornada de Guerrero, 12 de septiembre de 2013)

Inician maestros paro nacional (Proceso, 11 de septiembre de 2013)

A través de Facebook, amenazan de muerte a maestros chiapanecos (Proceso, 10 de septiembre de 2013)

La mirada femenina del derecho a la educación en México, por tres maestras de Oaxaca (Desinformémonos, 9 de septiembre de 2013)

En Oaxaca, sindicatos y organizaciones realizaron manifestaciones de apoyo a la CNTE (Página3.mx, 11 septiembre de 2013)