National: Article 19 Report “From the Digital to the Tangible”

December 5, 2016

a19

At the end of November, the organization for freedom of expression, Article 19, presented its “Third Quarterly Report: From the Digital to the Tangible”, in which it documented that 70% of attacks against the press are committed by the authorities and that only three out of 88 attacks registered against media or journalists are investigated by the Attorney General’s Office during that period.

It also pointed out that in nine months in 2016 there have been ten murders of journalists in Mexico, a number that exceeds the homicides of communicators in 2015.

Moreover, and as the title of the report evokes, there has been an increase in threats using the Internet and social networks: “Attacks in digital space aim to infuse fear, feelings of persecution and insecurity before the perception of an imminent risk. In addition, they manage to spread the sensation to close circles like family and friends and even journalists’ sources. This virulence could be documented with greater clarity during the third quarter, where direct attacks are observed mainly against those who defend human rights and share information critical of governments”, it said. Of the total threats received by journalists between July and September, six out of ten were made through social networks like Twitter.

For more information in Spanish:

2016 bate récord de periodistas asesinados durante gobierno de Peña: van 10 en 9 meses (Animal Político, 30 de noviembre de 2016)

Sólo 3 de las 88 agresiones a la prensa del último trimestre son investigadas por PGR: Artículo 19 (Sin Embargo, 30 de noviembre de 2016)

Tercer Informe Trimestral: De lo digital a lo tangible (Artículo 19, 30 de noviembre de 2019)

 For more information from SIPAZ:

Nacional : amenazan por Twitter al Centro Miguel Agustín PRODH (3 de octubre de 2016)

Oaxaca/Nacional: Allanan casa de fotoperiodista que cubrió hechos en Nochixtlán(14 de septiembre de 2016)

Oaxaca: Asesinaron a dos comunicadores en una semana (30 de junio de 2016)

 


Oaxaca: Alejandro Murat Takes Office as Governor

December 5, 2016

Governor.jpg@Twitter Murat

In the early morning of December 1 and in an alternate location, Alejandro Murat Hinojosa (of the Institutional Revolutionary Party, PRI) took office as the new governor of Oaxaca. The event took place in an alternate venue to the Congress facilities, which was taken over by teachers from Section 22 of the National Coordinator of Education Workers (CNTE), who also organized 37 road blocks in several parts of the state in the same context.

In a statement, Section 22 described the taking of office as “spurious and without consensus.” It emphasized that “a taking of office that arrives hidden from the Oaxacans, with hunger for power and ambition for authority is doomed to failure because it is not public, consensual and open to the peoples and communities.”

In a political declaration from the social movement, some 20 social organizations denounced that, “emboldened and thirsty for power before the arrival of the PRI to government, its political operators have begun to confront the popular movement, as has been observed in different scenarios.” It warned: “The immediate objective of the PRI is to continue the path of imposing structural reforms, allowing them to exploit natural resources (minerals, oil, gas, timber, etc.), obtain cheap labor (the health service is an example of embezzlement of millions, with popular insurance and universalization being rejected as fraud); to generate greater infrastructure for the transportation of goods (the trans- isthmus corridor, the highway to the isthmus and coast) and to advance with the liquidation of indigenous, social, trade union and human rights resistances, which have been examples at national level. “

Therefore, they called on “all democratic, progressive and revolutionary forces in Oaxaca to close ranks before the return of the PRI.”

On the same day, Murat Hinojosa announced the composition of his cabinet in which the appointment of a marine in charge of the Secretariat of Public Security, Frigate Captain Jose Raymundo Tuñón Jauregui who is also paratrooper of the Marine Corps and served as military attaché for several years in the United States is notable.

For more information in Spanish:

De madrugada y en sede alterna, Murat toma protesta como gobernador de Oaxaca (Aristegui Noticias, 1ero de diciembre de 2016)

A escondidas y de madrugada, Murat rinde protesta como gobernador de Oaxaca (Proceso, 1ero de diciembre de 2016)

“Espuria y sin consenso”, la toma de protesta de Murat: CNTE (Proceso, 1ero de diciembre de 2016)

Cerrar filas en el movimiento social, ante el retorno del PRI en Oaxaca (Declaración política de organizaciones sociales del estado, 1ero de diciembre de 2016)

Alejandro Murat da a conocer a su Gabinete legal (Página 3.mx, 1ero de diciembre de 2016)

Nombra Murat a Capitán de la Marina como titular de la SSP en Oaxaca (NVI Oaxaca, 1ero de diciembre de 2016)

 For more information from SIPAZ:

Nacional : Resultados de las elecciones del 5 de junio (16 de junio de 2016)


National: “Women Human Rights Defenders We Believe and Create” Campaign Launched

December 3, 2016

whrd

From November 25 to December 10, simultaneous activities will be carried out in 15 states within the framework of the “Women Defenders of Human Rights We Believe and Create” campaign, which seeks to disseminate a series of printed and electronic materials to make the contribution of women human rights defenders visible, as well as the adverse environment they to do their work.

The Human Rights Defenders Network in Mexico (RNDDHM in its Spanish acronym), which is composed of 222 feminist activists and groups that defend women’s human rights in 23 states, denounced that between 2010 and 2016, 41 women human rights defenders were murdered, 11 of whom were journalists.

They pointed out that the most attacked defenders are those who defend the right of women to a life free of violence, information rights and freedom of expression and the defense of the Earth, territory and natural resources, observing from 2012 “that the factious use of the system of procuration and administration of justice to inhibit and to diminish the work of the defenders is more frequent.”

For more information in Spanish:

Presentarán campaña “Defensoras de DH Creemos y Creamos” (CIMAC Noticias, 29 de noviembre de 2016)

Presentan la campaña “Defensoras de Derechos Humanos Creemos y Creamos” (Segunda a Segundo, 30 de noviembre de 2016)

Cápsula 1 Defensoras de Derechos Humanos Creemos y Creamos (Red Nacional de Defensoras de México, 25 de noviembre de 2016)

Cápsula 2 Defensoras de Derechos Humanos Creemos y Creamos (Red Nacional de Defensoras de México, 1ero de diciembre de 2016)

Principales agresores de defensoras y periodistas son servidores públicos: CIDHM (Desinformémonos, 30 de noviembre de 2016)

 For more information from SIPAZ :

México: Quinto aniversario de la Red Nacional de Defensoras de Derechos Humanos en México (RNDDHM) (14 de diciembre de 2015)

Chiapas/Internacional: Denuncian grave situación de defensor@s al Consejo de Derechos Humanos de la ONU; se presenta Defensoras somos Todas (12 de marzo de 2015)

 


Chiapas: Movement in Defense of Life and Territory 12-Day Pilgrimage Ends in San Cristobal de Las Casas

December 2, 2016

pilgrimsPhoto@SIPAZ

On November 25, after a 12-day walk through 11 indigenous municipalities in the North, Jungle area and Highlands of Chiapas, thousands of pilgrims arrived in San Cristobal de Las Casas, where they denounced the threats and insecurity that they live with in the villages where they come from.

The members of the pilgrimage belong to the Movement in Defense of Life and Territory (MODEVITE in its Spanish acronym) and the Believing Peoples of the parishes of Candelaria, Huixtan, Cancuc, Tenejapa, Oxchuc, Ocosingo, Altamirano, Chilon, Sitala, Yajalon and Salto de Agua: “We are the Movement in Defense of Life and Territory (MODEVITE), composed of ten parishes from 11 municipalities and 1 ejido. We are located in the high region of Chiapas. We started more than four years ago from the Believing Peoples of the Diocese of San Cristobal de Las Casas to stop the clandestine sale of alcohol in our communities but also our struggle stopped for a time the megaproject of government to build the San Cristóbal – Palenque highway. What are we looking for? Our goal is to organize and encourage the indigenous peoples of the area to build our autonomy as indigenous peoples and thus defend our Mother Earth; we want good living from our culture and that is why we say NO to everything that damages the lives of our children and our communities, NO to bad government and NO to the megaprojects that want to take away our territory.”

They declared: “We walk to unite with one voice, to give voice to the earth that calls for respect and protection, which demands from all an attitude of care and gratitude. This pilgrimage has been a moment of grace for us, because we have been able to converse, reflect and dream as one people.” They emphasized that as indigenous peoples they feel that their community belonging to Mother Earth “is our spirituality, so we believe that not only do we have to denounce the destruction of our territory by the ambition of extractivists, but we must take care of it. That is why strengthening our community roots is the way to take care of our common home.” In Oxchuc, a community torn by post-electoral conflict, the pilgrims also spoke of their right as indigenous peoples to govern themselves.

In one of the communiqués published during these days, MODEVITE announced that it will join the proposal of the National Indigenous Congress (CNI) to consult its communities on the appointment of an independent indigenous candidate for the next elections: “A change is needed among us and that is why we join the proposal of the National Indigenous Congress to consult our communities about the decision to participate in the next national elections with an independent indigenous candidate. We share the same objective, we believe that it is necessary to strengthen the voice of our indigenous peoples on the political agenda and that is why we want to take this initiative to our communities and municipalities.”

When they entered San Cristobal de Las Casas on November 25, they met with the women’s organizations that were taking part in the International Day against Violence against Women and arrived together to the center of the city: “Today, for example, being International Day against Violence against Women, we remember that women continue to be victims of sexism, alcoholism and the assistance-based government programs. The women  of MODEVITE claim the right to exercise our self-determination as indigenous women to care for Mother Earth and the life of our communities.”

For more information in Spanish:

“Signos de muerte” en territorios indígenas de Chiapas, (Proceso, 25 de noviembre de 2016)

Es tiempo de manifestar nuestras inquietudes, no permitamos que las piedras empezar a gritar, por eso el pueblo de dios está presente ante esta mega peregrinación (Las Abejas de Acteal, 25 de noviembre de 2016)

Se suma MODEVITE a la consulta convocada por el CNI para buscar candidata mujer indígena independiente, Chiapasparalelo, 25 de noviembre de 2016

Movimiento Indígena de Chiapas consultara plan de candidata presidencial, El Universal, 25 de noviembre de 2016

Defender los ejidos, fuerza organizativa de los territorios: Pueblo Creyente en Megaperegrinación (Comunicado del MODEVITE en Candelaria, 24 de noviembre de 2016)

En contra de este sistema económico de despojo: Pueblo Creyente en Megaperegrinación (Comunicado del MODEVITE en Huixtán, 23 de noviembre de 2016)

No queremos autopistas ni proyectos capitalistas: Pueblo Creyente en Megaperegrinación (Comunicado del MODEVITE en Tenejapa, 22 de noviembre de 2016)

Claman indígenas por desterrar a los partidos políticos y formar autogobiernos en Chiapas (Revista Proceso, 21 de noviembre de 2016)

Por la autonomía y resistencia de nuestros pueblos originarios: Pueblo Creyente en Megaperegrinación (Comunicado del MODEVITE en Cancúc, 21 de noviembre de 2016)

Tenemos el derecho como pueblos indígenas de autogobernarnos: Pueblo Creyente en Megaperegrinación (Comunicado del MODEVITE en Oxchuc, 20 de noviembre de 2016)

Modevite cumple 7 días de peregrinación por Chiapas, (La Jornada, 20 de noviembre de 2016)

En respeto a la tierra, el territorio, la autonomía y nuestra cultura: Pueblo Creyente en Megaperegrinación (Comunicado del MODEVITE en Ocosingo, 19 de noviembre de 2016)

El agua es un derecho, no una mercancia: Pueblo Creyente en Megaperegrinación (Comunicado del MODEVITE en Chilón, 18 de noviembre de 2016)

Exigimos la cancelación de concesiones mineras y proyectos hidroeléctricos: Pueblo Creyente en megaperegrinación (Comunicado del MODEVITE en Yajalón, 17 de noviembre de 2016)

Nos comprometemos a defender la Madre Tierra: Pueblo Creyente en Megaperegrinación (Comunicado del MODEVITE en Tumbalá, 16 de noviembre de 2016)

Indígenas de Chiapas inician peregrinación de 12 días contra megaproyectos, Proceso, 15 de noviembre de 2015

Queremos la buena vida para nuestras comunidades originarias: Pueblo Creyente en Megaperegrinación (Comunicado del MODEVITE en Salto de Agua, 14 de noviembre de 2016)

For more information from SIPAZ:

Chiapas: Día Internacional de Lucha Contra la Violencia hacia las Mujeres (28/11/2016)

 

 


Mexico/Guatemala: International Human Rights Observation Mission on Guatemala-Mexico Border

December 1, 2016

gm1“72” Refuge for Migrant Persons, Tenosique, Mexico. Photo@SIPAZ

An International Human Rights Observation Mission on the Guatemala-Mexico Border (MODH in its Spanish acronym) was held from November 10 to 16 to document and highlight the situation of systematic violations of human rights in the border region between Guatemala and Mexico.

The MODH was made up of 24 human rights defenders from countries such as Colombia, El Salvador, Ecuador, Spain, Mexico, the United States and Canada, and more than 30 who accompanied them belonging to the member organizations of the Cross-border Migration and Gender Coordination Committee (MTMG in its Spanish acronym) on both the Mexican and Guatemalan sides [of the border].

The MODH divided along two routes, both beginning their journey in the City of Guatemala.

– Route one passed through: Quetzaltenango, Huehuetenango, La Mesilla and on the Mexican side to Comalapa Border, Tapachula, Suchiate, Acacoyagua, Mapastepec, Tonala and Arriaga.

– Route two passed through: Coban, Sayaxche, Santa Elena and on the Mexican side, Tenosique, Palenque, Salto de Agua and Ocosingo.

They travelled in vehicles to a total of 30 locations and 2,211 kilometers of the cross-border region. Both routes met on November 15 in San Cristobal de Las Casas where they shared their experiences and observations.

GM2.jpgPhoto@SIPAZ

The observers had the opportunity to listen to problems of more than 70 organizations and collectives as well as different ways of combating them. They interviewed approximately 1,600 people affected by dispossession, violence against migrants and refugees, and gender-based violence, including members of the Mam, Quiche, Q’anjobal, Kakchiquel, Tseltal, Tsotsil, Tojolabal, Zoque, Chol and mestizos. The MODH visited places that are directly affected by this violence, and were able to verify and document not only constant situations of injustice but also that, in spite of this, people are still fighting for life and dignity.

Among the observations of the MODH, are:

– Since 2012, the number of Central American people who are arriving at the Guatemala/Mexico border has seen a steady increase.

– The number of women migrants has risen, accounting for almost 20% of the migration phenomenon.

– Although migrants from Guatemala, Honduras and El Salvador are the majority, people from other countries, such as the Congo, are now being registered.

– As a consequence of the implementation of energy, mining, agro-industrial, tourism and infrastructure projects, an accelerated dispossession of territory is happening, due to forced displacement, alteration of ecosystems, pollution of agricultural soils and water sources, as well as damage to health, divisions and impacts on the livelihoods of campesino and indigenous communities.

– There is “a common pattern of criminalization, persecution and repression of migrant women and human rights and territory defenders that can lead to loss of liberty and even murder.”

– Even the MODH was watched and harassed in some places by security and intelligence agents in both countries.

– In general, a lack of access to justice for those affected and the prevalence of impunity in the case of those who dare to report can be seen.

– The testimonies revealed a deep crisis of human rights violations with multiple cases of threats, criminality, trafficking, disappearance, kidnapping, robbery, assault, torture, mass murder, rape and sexual abuse, femicide, and corruption, among others.

GM3.jpgNovember 16: The MODH presents its findings in San Cristobal de Las Casas, Chiapas, where it also met with the “Caravan of Mothers of Disappeared Migrants.”

The MODH warned: “In most cases of human rights violations heard by the Mission, a direct responsibility of public authorities is identified, in collusion with organized crime and national and transnational corporations, which act through co-optation and corruption of the justice system, supported by the presence of private security companies and groups of armed civilians.”

For more information in Spanish:

Denuncian persecución a migrantes, mujeres y defensores en frontera sur (Desinformémonos, 21 de noviembre de 2016)

Patrón en la frontera sur, criminalización y persecución a mujeres, migrantes y defensores (Proceso, 17 de noviembre de 2016)

Comunicado final de la MODH (Voces mesoamericanas, a 16 de noviembre de 2016)

Plan Frontera Sur potencia deportaciones, acusan ONG (La Jornada, 13 de noviembre de 2016)

Inicia Misión Internacional de Observación de Derechos Humanos en la Frontera Guatemala-México (MODH) (Red Nacional de Organismos Civiles de derechos Humanos, Todos los Derechos para Todos y Todas, a 10 de noviembre de 2016)

For more information from SIPAZ:

Nacional/Internacional: anuncian Misión Internacional de Observación de Derechos Humanos en la frontera Guatemala-México (4 de noviembre de 2016)

 

 


Chiapas/National: New EZLN Communiqué Clarifies Joint Proposal with CNI

November 29, 2016

galSubcomandante Galeano (Photo@SIPAZ archives)

On November 17, 33 years after its foundation, the Zapatista Army of National Liberation (EZLN) published an extensive communiqué titled “A History to Understand”, in which it gives further details about the proposal of consultation with the peoples that make up the Indigenous National Congress (CNI in its Spanish acronym) to examine the convenience of naming a national council of government and an indigenous woman candidate for the 2018 elections.

Subcomandante Galeano clarified that, although the proposal was launched by the EZLN, “the CNI is who will decide whether or not to participate with a delegate of its own, and, if necessary, it will have the support of Zapatismo.” But, “No, neither the EZLN as an organization nor any of its members will run for a popular election position in the 2018 electoral process. No, the EZLN is not going to become a political party. No, the EZLN is not going to present a Zapatista indigenous woman as a candidate for the presidency of the Republic in the year 2018. No, the EZLN has not altered its course to any degree, nor will it continue its struggle along the electoral route institutional.” He ratified that “the EZLN does not struggle to take the Power.”

Subcomandante Galeano added that in making the proposal to the CNI, the EZLN stated “that it did not matter whether or not they won the Presidency of the Republic, that what was going to matter was the challenge, irreverence, insubordination, the total rupture of the image of the indigenous, subject to the alms and the image of pity so rooted on the institutional right and who, would say it, also on the left of ‘real change’ and its organic intellectuals addicted to the opium of social networks – that their daring would make the whole political system vibrate and that it would have echoes of hope not in one but in many of the Mexicans below … and the world.”

For more information in Spanish:

Comunicado “Una historia para tratar de Entender (EZLN, 17 de noviembre de 2016)

Lo importante es la insumisión, no ganar la presidencia con candidata indígena: EZLN (Proceso, 17 de noviembre de 2017)

 For more information from SIPAZ:

Chiapas/Nacional : Candidata presidencial “no es decisión de una persona” (Subcomandante Moíses) (15 de noviembre de 2016)

Chiapas /Nacional: Polémica después de la propuesta planteada por el EZLN y el CNI en octubre (24 de octubre de 2016)

Chiapas / Nacional : CNI y EZLN realizarán consulta para nombrar a una candidata indígena hacia las elecciones presidenciales de 2018 (15 de octubre de 2016)

 


Chiapas: Roberto Paciencia Released

November 28, 2016

robertopacienciaRoberto Paciencia. Photo@CDHFBC

On the afternoon of November 24, Roberto Paciencia Cruz, an indigenous tsotsil (Chenalhó), adherent to the Sixth Declaration of the Lacandon Jungle, was released having been acquitted.

Patcencia Cruz was received by relatives, friends and ex-prisoners in the Cathedral Square of San Cristobal de Las Casas, where a small party had been organized to demand his release since morning. “I was imprisoned for three years and three months, accused of the crime of kidnapping that I did not commit because I had nothing to do with it. Accused me just because justice is very regrettable in the country”, he said in an interview with media.

The “No Estamos Todxs” Working Group stated in a release: “Roberto, a former prisoner adherent to the Sixth Declaration of the Lacandon Jungle of the EZLN, is one of those people who do not keep silent, do not legitimize barbarism and are ready to take on the consequences of their cry of conscience and rebellion. In this way, through his voice he has denounced the human rights violations suffered by the prison population by the prison authorities and has inspired the awakening of other prisoners within the prison. This was one more case of a system of racist and classist state justice for which the fact of being poor and indigenous is a crime enough to imprison us. But also, an example of how the jail can be another trench of struggle from which to follow the relief of those who fought before and set an example for those who continue fighting for their freedom.”

For more information in Spanish:

Chiapas: absuelven a indígena tzotzil preso desde hace tres años (La Jornada, 24 de noviembre de 2016)

Pronunciamiento del Grupo de Trabajo « No estamos todxs » (24 de noviembre de 2016)

Vídeo (Regeneración Radio, 24 de noviembre de 2016)

 For more information form SIPAZ :

Chiapas: Juez dictaminará sentencia a Roberto Paciencia (15 de noviembre de 2016)

Chiapas: Procesión fuera del CERSS No.5 en exigencia de la liberación de Roberto Paciencia Cruz (31 de octibre de 2016)

Chiapas: Roberto Paciencia Cruz, injustamente preso, denuncia la negacion del acceso a sus visitas por segunda vez (a 19 de octubre 2016)

Chiapas: Carta de Roberto Paciencia Cruz en el marco del día internacional de los presos (24 de septiembre de 2016)