Guerrero: Ayotzinapa – seven months of impunity and struggling for justice

May 3, 2015
DSCF4155

Photo @SIPAZ

On 26 April, 7 months after the forcible disappearance of the 43 students from the Ayotzinapa Rural Normal School, some 400 people installed in Mexico City an “antimonument” to commemorate the fact that this State atrocity continues to go unresolved.  After the antimonument was installed, Melitón Ortega, one of the parents of the disappeared students, stressed that seven months have passed during which the relatives of the disappeared have sought justice and truth, but these months have also implied a great deal of pain and frustration.  Ortega demanded that the Federal Attorney General’s Office attend to the recommendations of the interdisciplinary group of experts from the Inter-American Commission on Human Rights to open new lines of investigation in the case, and to analyze the presumed participation of the military and the former governor Ángel Aguirre in the State crime.

On 23 April, Cuitláhuac and Lenin Mondragón attended the tenth Latin American Conference on Critical Jurisprudence “For Memory and Against Forgetting” that was held at the Center for Interdisciplinary Investigations in the Sciences and Humanities at the National Autonomous University of Mexico (UNAM).  They denounced that the murder of Julio César (the only one of the 43 youth whose remains have been found) has not been adequately covered by the Federal Attorney General’s Office (PGR), for the Guerrero state authorities have not carried out a “scientific investigation” to find and punish those responsible.  They demanded that the authorities provide justice in the case against the students, punishment of the intellectual and material authors of the crime, compensation of damages to the relatives of the disappeared in accordance with international standards, promises of non-repetition, the opening of new lines of investigation, and a formal recognition of the forcible disappearance of the 43 students, the extrajudicial murder of another six persons, including Julio César, and a recognition that Julio was tortured before his murder.

To demand justice, the defense lawyer Sayuri Herrera announced to SDP News that the family-members would request a summons before the Inter-American Court on Human Rights (IACHR) to denounce the case, given that, from their view, enough evidence exists to show that Julio César indeed was tortured.

For more information (in Spanish):

Impunidad, principal ganadora, dicen dos familiares de estudiante desollado (La Jornada, 24 de abril de 2015)

Llevarán a la Corte Interamericana asesinato del normalista Julio César Mondragón (SPDNoticias, 23 de abril de 2015)

Instalan antimonumento contra la impunidad por Ayotzinapa (La Jornada, 27 de abril de 2015)

Ayotzinapa: Siete meses de impunidad y lucha por la justicia (Centro ProDH, 27 de abril de 2015)

For more information from SIPAZ (in English):

Guerrero/International: Brigade for Ayotzinapa travels to Europe (24 April 2015)

Guerrero: IACHR experts confirm that the Ayotzinapa case is a forcible disappearance and a crime against humanity (10 April 2015)

Guerrero: Arrival of IACHR group to Mexico provides hope in the Ayotzinapa case (6 de marzo de 2015)

Guerrero: Investigation “based in scientific proof” requested in the Ayotzinapa case (1 March 2015)


Guerrero/Nacional: SCJN examines IACHR sentence in the case of Inés and Valentina, indigenous women who were raped by the military in 2002

May 3, 2015

Inés y Valentina (@Tlachinollan)Inés and Valentina (@Tlachinollan)

On 21 April, the plenary of the Supreme Court for Justice in the Nation (SCJN) began a discussion regarding the sentence provided by the Inter-American Court on Human Rights (IACHR) in August 2010 which condemned the Mexican State for the violation of the human rights of Valentina Rosendo Cantú and Inés Fernández Ortega, indigenous women who were sexually assaulted by soldiers in Guerrero state in 2002.

Valentina and Inés have requested that the SCJN treat their case as it did the Radilla case (a forcible disappearance, also from Guerrero state) to determine the obligations of the judiciary amidst the sentences emitted by the IACHR.  They believe that the discussion within the Supreme Court is critically important, as this could lead to penal processes against soldiers with a focus on sexual torture and the administration of justice with a sensitivity to matters of gender and ethnicity, among other questions.

The Tlachinollan Mountain Center for Human Rights, which has provided counsel for the two indigenous women, has declared that the process of debate “opens the possibility that the SCJN would recognize the symbolic struggle for justice that both women have undertaken, and to hand down criteria that would help indigenous women experience better conditions in their search for justice.  Above all, it would contribute to the cause of having sexual torture by investigated and adequately judged in Mexico.”

However, during one of the initial sessions, the SCJN decided to exclude from consideration the constitutionality of part II of the new article 57 of the Military Justice Code, which has to do with military tribunals.  Civil-society organizations present at the session expressed their concern due to this evident lack of concern for a deep analysis of the question.

For more information (in Spanish):

COMUNICADO “Inicia la SCJN discusión sobre las obligaciones del Poder Judicial de la Federación frente a las sentencias dictadas por la Corte Interamericana de Derechos Humanos en los casos de Inés Fernández y Valentina Rosendo” (Centro de Derechos Humanos de la Montaña Tlachinollan, 21 de abril de 2015)

Discute SCJN sentencia de CIDH por violación a indígenas en 2002 (La Jornada, 21 de abril de 2015)

Resoluciones de COIDH son obligatorias (El Universal, 21 de abril de 2015)

SCJN no revisará ley militar en caso de Valentina Rosendo e Inés Fernández (La Jornada, 23 de abril de 2015)

For more information from SIPAZ (in English):

Guerrero: Beginning of legal processes against soldiers presumed to be responsible in the cases of Inés Fernández and Valentina Rosendo (15 January 2014)

Guerrero: NGOs call on Peña Nieto to observe the sentences on Inés Fernández y Valentina Rosendo (5 February 2013)

Guerrero: Valentina Rosendo and Inés Fernández receive recognitions of their struggle (16 November 2012)

Guerrero – briefs: Mexican State recognizes responsibility in case of Valentina Rosendo (21 December 2011)


Chiapas: Demand for implementation of arrest-order against former PRI deputy accused of femicide

May 3, 2015
(@Radio Pozol)

@Radio Pozol

In a 21 April communiqué, the Fray Bartolomé de las Casas (CDHFBC) urged the Chiapas State Attorney General (PGJE) to execute the arrest-order against the former PRI deputy Elmar Darinel Díaz Solórzano, accused of the murder of Tatiana Trujillo Rodríguez five years ago.  To date, the case has evaded justice.

The CDHFBC expressed its “indignation amidst the lack of capacity and commitment on the part of the authorities charged with implementing justice in Chiapas state.”  It recalled that the judge Mariano Domínguez Hernández, then working in the Ocosingo jurisdiction, ordered the release of Díaz Solórzano on 1 April 2014 “in a sentence rife with grave irregularities.”  It questioned as well that the minimum sentence be just 25 years’ imprisonment, something that would “perpetuate impunity in the case, being undue, given the previous context of extreme violence that occurred during the murder of Tatiana Trujillo.”  With regard to compensation for incurred damages, the judges accepted two direct legal motions that dictate a minimum amount of 54.49 pesos, in accordance with the minimum wage.  In response, the CDHFBC expressed that this amount “does not take into account the economic solvency of the accused, who at the time of the crime was a local deputy of the Institutional Revolutionary Party (PRI), and had previously been a federal deputy as well.  Beyond this, the aforementioned resolution de-emphasizes the concept of comprehensive compensation, in accordance with the General Law on Victims, which in article 26 stipulates that victims ‘have the right to be compensated in an opportune, broad, transformational, comprehensive, and effective manner for the damages they have incurred as a consequence of the crime…  including measures of restitution, rehabilitation, compensation, satisfaction, and promises of non-repetition.”

For more information (in Spanish):

Boletín Elmar Darinel Díaz, profugo de la justicia (CDHFBC, 21 de abril de 2015)

Exige el Frayba reaprehensión de exdiputado feminicida (Proceso, 21 de abril de 2015)

For more information from SIPAZ (in English):

Chiapas: Impunity in the case of Tatiana Trujillo (16 September 2014)

Chiapas: State complicity in femicide is denounced (2 May 2014)

Chiapas: Commemoration of the murder of Itzel Janet Méndez-Pérez and other victims of femicide (26 April 2014)

Chiapas: Amidst increase in femicide and impunity, civil organization proclaims permanent Gender Alert (30 March 2014)

National: Multiple activities for International Women’s Day (16 March 2014)


Chiapas: Commemoration of 2 years since the murder of Juan Vázquez Guzman in San Sebastián Bachajón

April 28, 2015
(@vivabachajon.wordpress.com)

(@vivabachajon.wordpress.com)

On April 24, various activities were held in San Sebastián Bachajón in the conmemoration of 2 years since the murder of Juan Vasquez Guzman. Juan was the spokesman of the adherents to the Sixth Declaration of the Lacandon Jungle convened by the EZLN in this ejido, same that has been organized to defend their lands that are at the entrance to the waterfalls of Agua Azul.

For more information from SIPAZ (in spanish):

A 2 años de su asesinato Juan Vázquez Vive! (Blog de los Ejidatarios de San Sebastián Bachajón, 24 de abril de 2014)

For more information from SIPAZ (in English):

Chiapas: legal motion denied to the ejidatarios of San Sebastián Bachajón (April 24, 2015)

Chiapas: Regional headquarters of San Sebastián Bachajón burned down; autonomous journalists attacked (10 April 2015)

Chiapas: new national and international brigade in solidarity with San Sebastián Bachajón (1 March 2015)

Chiapas: Tensions maintained in San Sebastián Bachajón(10 February 2015)

Chiapas: first report of the caravan of adherents to the Sixth to San Sebastían Bachajón after the violent displacement of 9 January (29 January 2015)

Chiapas: Indigenous ejidatarios from San Sebastián Bachajón are forcibly cleared from the entrance of the Agua Azul waterfalls (21 January 2015)


Oaxaca: At 5-years since the murder of human rights defenders Bety Cariño and Jyri Jaakkola

April 28, 2015

Jyri

April 20 marks five years since the murder of the human rights defenders Bety Criño and Jyri Jaakkola (from Finland), who died while participating in a humanitarian caravan to San Juan Copala in the Triqui zone of the state of Oaxaca. To date, little has advanced “in the apprehension and the trial of those responsible, despite the fact that they are already identified.”, denounced Karla Michael Salas, President of the National Association of Democratic Lawyers (ANAD). She informs that if 14 orders of apprehension were put in place against the suspects, one of those listed already died and only three have been arrested. She manifested that, “there is a policy of simulation with these detentions, because they only occur when there is pressure or visits from Euro Mps (who give follow-ups on the the case) or from the family of Jyri. That cannot be considered as a truthful way to punish the ones guilty.”

As part of the commemoration, various actions and protests were held. Carmen Trujillo, sister to Bety, said that “at 5 years of the murder of Jyri and Bety, a response does not exist and there are two people detained, but that does not mean that the problem has been solved to its roots.” Omar Esparza, widow of Bety Cariño and leader of the organization MAIZ, from his part said the protests will not end until there is progress and until justice is reached.

For more information from SIPAZ (in Spanish):

Cinco años del asesinato de Cariño y Jaakkola (La Jornada, 26 de abril de 2015)

A 5 años de la emboscada en Copala hoy recuerdan a Bety y Jyri (NssOaxaca, 26 de abril de 2015)

For more information from SIPAZ (in English):

Oaxaca: Two female witnesses threatened in the murder case of Bety Cariño and Jyri Jaakkola (March 1, 2015)

Oaxaca: 4 years and 7 months later, presumed murderer of human-rights defenders Bety Cariño and Jyri Jaakkola is apprehended (February 8, 2015)


Chiapas: Civil society Las Abejas denounce human rights violations in the country and show solidarity with various processes

April 24, 2015

abejas

Acteal (@Civil Society Las Abejas)

On April 22, as part of the monthly commemoration of the masacre of December 1997 in the municipality of Chenalho, members of Civil Society Las Abejas de Acteal held an event in the same community and through a communique, denounced “the policies of the ´bad´ state and federal government against organized peoples who fight, resist, and build their autonomy” in Chiapas and Mexico.

In the same letter, they sympathized with the families of the 43 missing students from Ayotzinapa, acknowledging their current tour in Europe; with the Believing People of Simojovel,“because the fight of said community against alcohol, drugs, and violence, is fair and necessary”; and with the forcibly displaced families of Primero de Agosto (municipality of Las Margaritas, Chiapas) who demand justice and the return to their poblado (community). They warned that “we can continue with more examples of the things we know why they happen, because Mexico is kidnapped and ruled by narco-politicians.”

Despite the panorama, they rescued that, “Although the ´bad´governments have wanted to bury the truth and have tried to divide our organization, but with our memory, conviction, and hope, they have failed.” Likewise, they invited “the men and women of good hearts who also fight like us, to stay awake and organized, to defend life, to defend Mother Earth from the clutches of the ´bad´ governments and monster murderer-capitalist neoliberal system.”

For more information from SIPAZ (in Spanish):

Comunicado de Las Abejas de Acteal 22 de abril de 2015 (Sociedad Civil Las Abejas, 22 de abril de 2015)

For more information from SIPAZ (in English):

Chiapas: Communiqué from the Las Abejas Civil Society in observance of the monthly commemoration of the Acteal massacre (April 21, 2015)

Chiapas: Las Abejas de Acteal reject dams and high electricity prices, affirming “Free Rivers and Free People” instead  (April 10, 2015)

Chiapas: Las Abejas Civil Society expresses solidarity with the relatives and comrades of the disappeared students from Ayotzinapa, Guerrero (February 5, 2015)


Chiapas: Rise in threats against the priest and members of the Believing People in Simojovel

April 24, 2015

Peregrinación del Pueblo Creyente de Simojovel a Tuxtla Gutiérrez (@SIPAZ)

Pilgrimage of the Believing People of Simojovel to Tuxtla Gutiérrez (@SIPAZ)

In a communique released on April 13 by the Believing People of Simojovel, the movement’s members denounce an increase in the threats, persecutions, and harassment against their priest, Marcelo Pérez, as well as against members of the Parish Council and the Believing People from this municipality.  These acts were exacerbated by a mass-march held from March 23 to 26, which ended with the participation of thousands in Tuxtla Gutiérrez, the state-capital of Chiapas.  Providing a larger historical account, the Believing People reviewed the latest incidents, including the fact that a million-peso bounty has been placed on Marcelo, in addition to the presence of armed groups near the location where the Parish Council carries out its activities, the threat to “do as inActeal,” as well as the arbitrary arrest of the catechist who read the press-release before the start of the pilgrimage.

Despite all of this, the Believing People reiterated that they will “continue to fight peacefully for the dignified life of the people, amidst so many injustices, the corruption of the authorities, drug-trafficking, drug-politicians who ambitiously seek to obtain government posts this year–amidst the arms trade, the opening of new bars, and the general decomposition of the social fabric.”

For more information (in Spanish):

Tras peregrinación, incrementan amenazas contra Padre Marcelo y Pueblo Creyente de Simojovel (Chiapas Paralelo, 15 de abril de 2015)

Continúan amenazas a la vida del sacerdote Marcelo Pérez e integrantes del Pueblo Creyente y Consejo Parroquial de Simojovel(Comunicado de la parroquia de Simojovel, 13 de abril de 2015)

For more information from SIPAZ (in English):

Chiapas: OMCT and FIDH urge protection of Simojovel priest (23 April 2015)

Chiapas: New threats against members of the Believing People in Simojovel after their fifth pilgrimage demanding security and peace (12 November 2014)

Chiapas: Urgent Action concerning threats to Marcelo Pérez, priest of Simojovel (28 June 2014)


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