International: IGIE Presents Second Report on Ayotzinapa in the European Parliament

October 8, 2016

Ayotzi1.pngProtest in front of the European Parliament. Photo @Marco Appel

On September 26, the Interdisciplinary Group of Independent Experts (IGIE) officially presented its second report on the Ayotzinapa case to the Human Rights Subcommittee of the European Parliament and also demanded “that human rights take their place in the negotiations that the European Union (EU) is currently holding with the Mexican government for the “modernization” of the free trade agreement.”

In the meeting of the subcommittee, coinciding with the second anniversary of the disappearance of the 43 student teachers from Ayotzinapa, IGIE members Francisco Cox and Claudia Paz y Paz also considered “quite disappointing” the appointment of Thomas Zeron as technical secretary of the National Council for Public Safety immediately after resigning as director of the Criminal Investigation Agency and responsible for solving the disappearance of the students. According to Cox, in an interview before his intervention at the European Parliament, “We hope that the follow-up mechanism (which the Inter-American Commission on Human Rights and the Mexican government launched) is given all the access we saw blocked at the end of our mandate.”

Before the IGIE presentation in Brussels, Amnesty International and a group of Mexican residents held a protest in Luxembourg Square, located opposite the European Parliament. “Two years later, 43 students are still missing in Mexico” read a banner in English placed on top of a monument surrounded by 43 human silhouettes with pasted photographs of the disappeared youths.

For more information in Spanish:

Pide GIEI-Ayotzinapa a Unión Europea incluir derechos humanos en renegociación del TLC (Educa, Servicios Para una Educación Alternativa A.C., a 28 de septiembre 2016)

Pide el GIEI a Eurocámara incluir derechos humanos en acuerdo comercial con México(Proceso, a 26 de septiembre 2016)

For more information from Sipaz:

Nacional: Ayotzinapa, dos años de desasosiego, dolor e impunida  (30 de septiembre de 2016)

Nacional: Se aprueba la implementación del Mecanismo de Seguimiento para el caso Ayotzinapa (30 de septiembre de 2016)

Guerrero/México: GIEI concluye su trabajo México entregando un segundo informe (28 de abril de 2016)

Guerrero: Two Student Teachers from Ayotzinapa Murdered

October 8, 2016

Ayotzi.pngDesinformémonos Photo @Aurora Roja

On October 4 (5:50 pm), five passengers were shot dead during an assault on public transport, including the students from the Ayotzinapa Normal Rural School: Johnatan Morales Hernandez and Filemon Tacuba Castro.

The Ministry of Public Security of the state confirmed that it was an armed assault on the Chilpancingo-Tixtla road. According Sur newspaper “and according to an audio broadcast on social networks, the attackers were inside the unit and knew that several of the occupants were students from Ayotzinapa.”

The attackers killed the students Jonatan Morales Hernandez, a fourth-year student, Group A of Saucito community in the Municipality of Tecoanapa, and Filemon Tacuba Castro, also a fourth-year student, Group B, from Apantla, Ayutla de los Libres Municipality, Guerrero.

Jonatan Hernandez Morales and Filemon Tacuba Castro were travelling with others on public transport from Chilpancingo to Tixtla where the Normal school is located. “A source from the State Police reported that two victims died where the assault occurred and the other three died while receiving medical care.” The other gunshot victims are a woman, a girl and an eight-year-old boy.

According to Radio Formula, “with great sadness and pain, the parents of the 43 students missing from Iguala on September 26, 2014, as well as the students of the Raul Isidro Burgos Normal Rural School said farewell” this October 5 to the two murdered youths recalling that “they can cut all the flowers, but never stop the spring.”

For more information in Spanish:

Confirman normalistas de Ayotzinapa asesinato de dos de sus compañeros en carretera Chilpancingo-Tixtla (Desinformémonos, a 5 de octubre 2016)

Matan en Chilpancingo a cinco pasajeros de una Urvan; dos eran alumnos de Ayotzinapa (El Sur periódico de Guerrero, a 5 de octubre 2016)
Velan en normal de Ayotzinapa a estudiantes asesinados, padres de 43 condenan su muerte ( RadioFórmula, a 05 de octubre de 2016)

For more information from Sipaz:

Nacional: Ayotzinapa, dos años de desasosiego, dolor e impunidad

Nacional: Se aprueba la implementación del Mecanismo de Seguimiento para el caso Ayotzinapa

National: The CNDH Presents its Report on Recommendations on Human Rights Violations

September 29, 2016

SE CNDHLuis Raul Gonzalez Perez, CNDH president, Photo@Luis Barrón, SinEmbargo

On June 8, National Human Rights Commission (CNDH) presented its report on recommendations for human rights violations in Mexico City.

According to the CNDH, the states that have received the most recommendations from 1990 to the present are Guerrero, Oaxaca, Chiapas, Mexico City and Veracruz.

The commission’s report states, “that in the last 26 years 2,537 recommendations were issued to 1,102 authorities, of which 361 are still pending compliance with some of the recommended points.”

Raul Gonzalez Perez, president of the CNDH, stated “that the federal authorities with the most recommendations are the Attorney General’s Office (PGR), the Mexican Social Security Institute (IMSS), the Secretariat of National Defense (Sedena) and the executive powers of Chiapas and Oaxaca, with 105 and 104 cases respectively.”

The report notes that, “[in] the breakdown by state, the Guerrero authorities top the list with 136, followed by Oaxaca with 134, Chiapas with 127, Mexico City with 100 and Veracruz with 93.” The 320 outstanding recommendations are related to 530 issued between 2011 and 2016, of which 60 percent have not been met in full.

The National Security Commission (CNS), IMSS, PGR, the Department of Defense and the Governor of Guerrero are the authorities that must fulfill most of the recommendations. “Some 28 of these outstanding recommendations are more than six years old, 57 between four and six, 132 three to four, 128 between one and two, and 16 less than a year.”

According to Sin Embargo, the most important points of non-compliance with these recommendations are “related to guarantees of non-repetition, attention to victims and processes to determine administrative and criminal responsibilities of public servants.”

For more information in Spanish:

Guerrero, Oaxaca, Chiapas y la CdMx, los estados que más violan los derechos humanos: CNDH (Sin Embargo, a 08 de julio 2016)


National: March for Resignation of Enrique Peña Nieto

September 28, 2016

epnCall for march for resignation of Peña Nieto

On September 15, the symbolic commemoration day of “El Grito” – the cry for the Independence of Mexico – thousands of people responded to the call launched on social networks for a march to demand the resignation of Enrique Peña Nieto.

#RenunciaYa, is the hashtag with which this non-partisan demonstration was called for on social networks since September 2, just after the publication of the Government’s fourth report. Led by parents of the 43 student teachers from Ayotzinapa, followed by farmers from Atenco, machete in hand, about 4,000 citizens, mostly young, began the #RenunciaYa protest, according to Animal Politico. The protesters left the Angel of Independence monument with the aim of reaching the Zocalo to face the president. However, at the Palace of Fine Arts, thousands of riot police, deployed by the Ministry of Public Security of Mexico City, blocked their passage. However, in the Zocalo, a small group of protesters who had managed get through started whistling and shouting slogans against the president just as President Enrique Peña Nieto appeared. According to La Jornada, “a young man showed a poster criticizing the federal administration and was immediately surrounded by elements of the Federal and Presidential Police. Some people demanded that the police allow the youth to express himself, to which they responded “we are only following orders.” Federal Police kept the young man surrounded until the fireworks ended, he was photographed and they made video of the youth and finally two policemen said they would accompany him to the exit.”

In Chiapas, the governor, Manuel Velasco Coello, did “El Grito” from an alternative site to the square of Tuxtla Gutierrez, as it was occupied by teachers opposed to the education reform bill.

For their part, the Las Abejas of Acteal Civil Society Organization, in their last statement, give several examples of why, according to them, “there is no longer independence.” They claim that, “this heroic and historic struggle for the independence of Mexico […] has been betrayed by the PRI governments and other political parties in Mexico who have been in power.” Because “The idea of the struggle, independence in 1810, meant that Mexico was independent, sovereign, democratic. […] However, the edge of that independence began to end with the government of Carlos Salinas de Gortari with agreements and commercial, political and military treaties with neoliberal and capitalist countries, one of them is: the North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA) between Mexico, the United States and Canada.”

In addition, the Xinich’ Coordinator of Social Organizations remembered September 15 with a statement in which it demands the removal of Enrique Peña Nieto as an “incompetent” in addition to “delivering our nation into the hands of foreigners.” It also expressed support for the struggle of the teachers against the so-called educational reform and demanded “the repeal of structural reforms, justice for the people massacred at Viejo Velasco, Acteal, for the 43 disappeared student teachers of Ayotzinapa, for Nochixtlan, Oaxaca, compliance with the San Andrés agreements signed between the federal government and the EZLN…”

 In Oaxaca, in the state capital, the governor, Cué Monteagudo, did his sixth and last “Grito” from the balcony of the government palace amid shouts of “murderer” and “traitor”. According to Educa, “elements of the State Police prevented the entry of teachers from Section 22 into the square to give their alternative ‘Grito’ with teargas, sparking a confrontation”. At least 20 people sustained minor injuries.

For more information in Spanish:

En méxico ya no existe independencia, es por las mal llamadas reformas constitucionales (Las abejas de Acteal, 22 de septembre de 2016)

#Chiapas Xinich’ recordó el “15 de Septiembre” exigiendo la renuncia de EPN, la abrogación de las reformas estructurales y el cumplimientos de los “Acuerdos de San Andrés” (Koman Iles, 20 de septiembre)

Marchan para exigir la renuncia de Peña Nieto (La Jornada, a 16 de septiembre 2016)

15 de septiembre: Policías repliegan marchas en Oaxaca y Chiapas (Educa, a 15 de septiembre 2016)

Miles de personas dan el Grito en el Zócalo (La Jornada, a 15 de septiembre 2016)

Renuncia ya y los acarreados: dos marchas rumbo al Zócalo (Animal político, a 16 de septiembre 2016)

Hay apertura para la crítica, dice presidencia sobre posible rechifla a Peña durante el Grito (Animal político, a 14 de septiembre 2016)

15 razones para marchar y gritar #RenunciaYA (Animal político, a 6 de septiembre 2016)

Ciudadanos convocan a marchar hoy 15 de septiembre para exigir renuncia de Peña (Animal político, a 2 de septiembre 2016)

 For more information from Sipaz:

Nacional : cuarto informe del gobierno de Peña Nieto (12 de septiembre 2016)


National: Back to School with no Sign of Resumption of Dialogue between Teachers and Government

September 27, 2016

teachersTeachers’ movement sit-in in, Tuxtla Gutierrez, September 11 @ SIPAZ

On September 19, teachers of Sections 7 and 40 of the National Union of Education Workers (SNTE) in Chiapas began the 2016-2017 school year after four months of work stoppage to demand the repeal of the education reform bill, passed in 2013. Section 22 in Oaxaca had done the same since September 7. In both cases, no incidents occurred.

Now that school activities have returned to normal throughout the country, teachers’ leaders reiterated their call for the federal government to return to the national negotiating table. They told media that they maintain their three axes of struggle: “strengthen the reorganization stage, promote legislative means to respond to our demand for repeal of educational reform and continue the construction of an alternative education proposal.”

The head of the Federal Ministry of Public Education (SEP), Aurelio Nuño Mayer, has maintained his position: there will be dialogue in Michoacan, Guerrero, Oaxaca and Chiapas “to be able to settle local issues in these four states; that is to say administrative problems.” He reiterated that under no circumstances will they accept tables to discuss the repeal of educational reform.

For more information in Spanish:

Nuño: pese a conflicto con la CNTE, las clases están plenamente restauradas (La Jornada, 24 de septiembre de 2016)

CNTE insiste al gobierno que regrese a negociar (La Jornada, 24 de septiembre de 2016)

Sección 22 de la CNTE pacta pagos y ascensos con el gobierno (Proceso, 23 de septiembre de 2016)

Regresan a clases tras 120 días de paro magisterial en Chiapas (La Jornada, 19 de septiembre de 2016)

‘‘Nos dejaron solos’’, reprochan varios docentes de Chiapas a los de Oaxaca (7 de septiembre de 2016)

En el eventual diálogo con la CNTE sólo se tratarán temas administrativos: Nuño (La Jornada, 6 de septiembre de 2016)

Los 114 días que sacudieron a México (La Jornada, 6 de septiembre de 2016)

For more information from SIPAZ:

Nacional : impasse en dialogo entre el Magisterio y el gobierno; parcial regreso a clases (2 de septiembre de 2016)

Chiapas: Desalojo violento hacia el plantón de maestros y maestras en San Cristóbal de Las Casas (22 de julio de 2016)

Oaxaca/ Nacional: La CNTE y la Segob acuerdan mesas de negociación (13 de julio de 2016)

Oaxaca: Organizaciones de Derechos Humanos presentan informe sobre represión en Nochixtlán (11 de julio de 2016)


Chiapas/Oaxaca: Actualización de las protestas magisteriales; al menos 6 muertos en Oaxaca (21 de junio de 2016)

Chiapas: Letter from Roberto Paciencia Cruz on International Prisoners’ Day

September 27, 2016

prisoners.jpgImage @ Beatriz Aurora

This September 24, as part of International Prisoners Day, Roberto Paciencia Cruz, unjustly imprisoned in Penitentiary No. 5, San Cristobal de Las Casas, Chiapas, adherent to the Sixth Declaration of the Lacandon Jungle of the EZLN, shares his word. In an open letter to public opinion, the state media, national and international alternative media, the Sixth, the brothers and sisters of Believing Peoples, to the Diocese of San Cristobal de Las Casas, independent organizations, the National Indigenous Congress and the EZLN, in the name of all those unjustly imprisoned, Roberto reveals the pain, preoccupations and injustice that they are suffering by being separated from their families. He claims that “those who are most punished by these injustices” are the prisoners’ families. He points out the lack of consideration by the authorities for them: “the governors do not care that the family of a prisoner is crying, or go to sleep hungry or that our children walk barefoot for lack of support from their parents.”

Roberto ends his letter inviting “all state, national and international independent organizations to join this cause in demand for our freedom.”

It should be remembered that despite giving ample evidence of his innocence, more than three years of his detention, Patience Roberto Cruz has still not been sentenced.

For more information in Spanish:

Velasco Coello el acérrimo enemigo de indígenas, a quienes se les fabrica delitos y se les encierra en la cárcel (Revolución TRESPUNTOCERO, 11 de agosto de 2016)

 For more information from Sipaz:

Chiapas: Niegan entrada a visitas del injustamente preso, Roberto Paciencia Cruz, en el CERESO No. 5   (30 de agosto de 2016)

Chiapas: Roberto Paciencia Cruz, tres años preso en el Centro Estatal de Reinserción Social de Sentenciados (CERSS) número 5 (19 de agosto de 2016)


Chiapas: Roberto Paciencia escribe a Alejandro Díaz (24 de junio de 2016)



Chiapas: Roberto Paciencia se asume como Adherente a La Sexta (25 de mayo de 2016)

Chiapas: Denuncia Roberto Paciencia desatención en su salud visual (24 de febrero de 2016)

National: Official Visit to Mexico of UNO Working Group on Business and Human Rights

September 26, 2016

ONU.jpgPavel Sulyandziga and Dante Pesce, United Nations Working Group, during the presentation of their preliminary report. Photo:@Jesús Villaseca.

From August 29 to September 7, two representatives of the Working Group on Business and Human Rights of the UN made an official visit to Mexico: Pavel Sulyandziga, a human rights defender of Russian origin, who currently serves as president of the Working Group, and Chilean Dante Pesce, who has a long history of working with civil organizations both nationally and internationally. The purpose of the visit was, first, to identify cases of damages to individuals, communities and the environment due to business activities. After, to promote respect for human rights on the part of any company implementing the three Guiding Principles of the United Nations on business and human rights. The first principle states that, “the State is responsible to respect, protect and enforce human rights.” The second defines that “companies must comply with the laws made by the state and respect human rights.” The third states that, “Those affected should have access to redress mechanisms.”

Prior to the arrival of the Working Group, more than 100 civil society organizations, groups, communities and academics prepared a report to give an overview of the situation at national level. This coalition documented 68 cases that show serious violations and abuses of human rights by the State and companies from different sectors, and a lack of access to remediation for victims. It shows that the most frequently violated rights are: to land and territory (32 cases), access to information (28 cases) and to a healthy environment (22 cases). The sectors where most abuses were documented were: mining (11 cases), hydrocarbons (9), energy (8), construction (8) and industrial agriculture (6). In addition, more than 50% of cases of intimidation and threats against opponents of business projects were documented.

During their ten-day visit, members of the Working Group went to Mexico City, the States of Mexico, Oaxaca, Jalisco and Sonora, where they held meetings with various actors: officials from the three levels of government; companies like Grupo Bimbo, Grupo Mexico, Cemex, Pemex and CFE; civil society organizations and human rights defenders. They also received 81 testimonies from individuals and representatives of communities affected by various business activities, lack of access to information and consultation and on behalf of victims of violations of labor rights, and victims of serious impact to their health and environment. In Oaxaca, they listened to indigenous communities in the municipalities of El Espinal and Juchitan de Zaragoza affected by wind farm projects, who claim that “the whole consultation process was considered defective, since windmills had already been installed in the region without any prior consultation.” In the State of Mexico, they visited the Otomi-Mexica indigenous community in San Francisco Xochicuautla, opposed to a compulsory purchase order issued in October 2012 without any prior consultation in order to build the Toluca-Naucalpan highway on their land. Despite obtaining a restraining order, the construction of the highway has continued with the approval of state and federal authorities. The representatives of the Working Group reported that the Grupo Higa, builders of the project, never responded to their request for an interview.

On September 7, members of the working group presented a preliminary report on the results of their visit at a press conference. At the conference, Pavel Sulyandziga said: “It became clear that the main concerns about human rights violations linked to business are related to improper exercise of due diligence by the government and companies in the design and implementation of large scale projects. These are mainly projects in the mining, energy, construction and tourism sectors, which often affect indigenous communities. “

Furthermore, the preliminary report addresses challenges regarding labor rights in the country to remedy “the precarious situation of workers hired temporarily, the lack of access to social security, low wages and a minimum wage which is currently below the level [of the cost of] the basic food basket and is not sufficient to allow workers to support themselves and their families”, and “the weak capacity of the labor inspectorate to effectively monitor compliance with labor standards. “

The final report will be submitted in June 2017, at the 35th session of the Human Rights Council of the United Nations Organization. Meanwhile, the Working Group calls on the Mexican Government to “advance transparency, consultation, due diligence and respect for people and the environment” and on companies to “maintain standards of human rights and avoid seeking profit from impunity, corruption and lack of transparency and accountability.” It concluded by saying that there is much to be done to improve the current crisis of human rights in Mexico: “greater efforts are needed to change public policies, practices, mentalities but also to foster a culture of transparency, integrity, ethical behavior and democratic values.”

 Para más información: ( Proceso, a 24 de agosto de 2016)
Visita a México del Grupo de Trabajo sobre Empresas y DDHH: Puntos desde la Sociedad Civil (Asociación Interamericana para la Defensa del Ambiente (AIDA), a 29 de agosto de 2016)

12 claves sobre la investigación de la ONU a empresas y los derechos laborales en México (Animal político, a 8 de septiembre 2016)
Boletín: El Estado mexicano debe cumplir las recomendaciones del Grupo de Trabajo de la ONU sobre empresas y derechos humanos ( Centro de Derechos Humanos Fray Bartolomé de las Casas, a 08 de septiembre 2016)

Deberá acatar México recomendaciones de la ONU sobre empresas y derechos humanos: ONGs (Aristegui Noticias, a 08 de septiembre 2016)

Declaración del Grupo de trabajo de Naciones Unidas sobre empresas y derechos humanos al final de su visita a México Ciudad de México, 7 de septiembre de 2016 ( Oficina del Alto Comisionada de las Naciones Unidad Derechos Humanos, a 09 de septiembre de 2016)

Concluye visita de grupo de trabajo de la ONU en México ( La Jornada, a 17 de septiembre 2016)

Para más información de Sipaz:

Nacional: Irrupciones en territorios indígenas para la implementación de megaproyectos: San Francisco Xochicuautla y Atenco (4 de abril de 2016)

Nacional: Xochicuautla obtiene cancelación de la autopista (17 de marzo de 2016)

Oaxaca: Indígenas zapotecos se amparan por violaciones graves al derecho a la consulta (21 de agosto de 2015)