Guerrero/National: Nestora Salgado, newly accused

June 29, 2015

(@Revolución tres punto cero)

(@Revolución tres punto cero)

Nestora Salgado García, the ex-commander from the Communal Police (PC) of Olinalá, has been told by the Guerrero State Attorney General that she now faces three additional charges, including kidnapping, robbery, and homicide. Her attorney, Sandino Rivero, reported that her new accusers are unknown, and that the identity of the presumed murder victims is also unknown. The charges are still informal, but they will soon be applied against her. Furthermore, he adds that these three new charges were not detailed in her original arrest on 21 August 2013, nearly two years ago. According to CIMAC News, the defense counsel’s analysis is that the State Attorney “had been keeping” these other charges, thus indicating that its office would not desist, despite the calls made by the Guerrero State Governor, Rogelio Ortega.

The PC ex-commander has been imprisoned on three charges of kidnapping of people who were being re-educated at the Justice House in El Paraíso. She is presently being held in the Center for Social Readaptation in Tepepan, where she had been transferred after a hunger-strike that lasted 31 days, one she undertook to demand her transfer and that of her PC comrades who are also imprisoned. Until 29 May, she had been held in the high-security prison in Tepic, Nayarit, 1,100 kilometers from her land of origin.

According to the “Sin Embargo” media, beyond having raised consciousness about irregularities in the health center and promoting unions in Olinalá to re-educational campaigns, Salgado revealed that, before her arrest, she had shown several officials videos evidencing the rapes of children. These authorities then went to an Admiral of the Navy, a General from the Secretary for National Defense (SEDENA), and the then-governor, Ángel Aguirre Rivero, who then committed himself to referring the matter to the Federal Attorney General (PGR), but in the end nothing was investigated. Nestora holds that she surely disturbed powerful interests with her denunciations of these cases of the rapes of children, with this being the actual reason she has been imprisoned.

In an interview with Proceso, she adds that “they are hurt that I have told them that the system is corrupt; they are trying to bury my voice, which was heard.” She assures that the system has failed everyone. “If I am released, as I hope I will (it must be this way), or if I must give my life for this struggle, I will do it. I will not be silent; I am not afraid. I am someone who believes in the systematic re-education of the people (of the CRAC), and I believe we can indeed change many things—not just in Guerrero, but throughout the country.”

For more information (in Spanish):

La delincuencia nos respetó, el que quiso destruirnos fue el gobierno”: Nestora Salgado (Proceso, 22 de junio de 2015)

Ahora Fiscalía de Guerrero acusa a Nestora Salgado de homicidio(Cimac Noticias, 19 de junio de 2015)

Nestora revela que mostró a jefes militares y a Aguirre videos de abuso a menores (Sin Embargo, 22 de junio de 2015)

A punto de ser liberada, la ex comandanta Nestora Salgado acusada de secuestro, robo y homicido, nuevamente (Revolución tres punto cero, 22 de junio de 2015)

For more information from SIPAZ (in English):

Guerrero/National: Nestora Salgado is transferred to a Mexico City prison (10 June 2015)

Guerrero: Still on hunger strike, Nestora Salgado continues to hope for transfer as her health declines (9 June 2015)

Guerrero: political prisoner Nestora Salgado, coordinator of the Communal Police of Olinalá, begins hunger strike (16 May 2015)

Guerrero: IACHR calls on Mexican government to guarantee medical attention to Nestora Salgado (8 February 2015)


Chiapas: Minerva, half of her life disappeared, with no justice

June 29, 2015

Minerva Guadalupe Pérez Torres

Minerva Guadalupe Pérez Torres

On 20 June 2015, Minerva Guadalupe Pérez Torres would have had her thirty-eighth birthday. That same day in 1996, she was “headed to the Masojá Shucjá community, Tila municipality, Chiapas, to visit her ill father. On her route, in the Miguel Alemán community, she was intercepted by members of the ‘Development, Peace, and Justice’ paramilitary group, who kidnapped her, tortured her sexually and otherwise for three days, and then forcibly disappeared her. Nearly two decades after, her whereabouts are entirely unknown,” indicates the Fray Bartolomé de Las Casas Center for Human Rights (CDHFBLC). Beyond this, a public bulletin reported that the relatives of Minerva and other forcibly disappeared and extrajudicially executed persons are receiving notes “to confront their aggressors, the paramilitary leaders of Development, Peace, and Justice: Diego Vázquez Pérez, Sabelino Torres Martínez, Marcos Albino, and Samuel Sánchez, who are ordered to appear before a judge or face a fine of $2,048 [Mexican pesos] if they fail to comply.”

This aforementioned group was trained and protected by the State Police and the Mexican Army in the 1990s as a counter-insurgency weapon, as demonstrated in the Chiapas Campaign Plan 94. The CDHFBLC documented that Development, Peace, and Justice carried out 85 executions, 37 forcible disappearances, and forcibly displaced more than 4,500 people.

For more information (in Spanish):

Minerva Guadalupe: Verdad y Justicia hasta encontrarte (CDHFBLC, 23 de junio de 2015)

La indígena chiapaneca Minerva Guadalupe Pérez, lleva desaparecida más de la mitad de su vida (Desinformémonos, 23 de junio de 2015)

Desaparición forzada en Chiapas, bajo una loza de impunidad (Centro Prodh, 23 de junio de 2015)

For more information from SIPAZ (in English):

Chiapas: 18 years since the disappearance of Minerva Pérez, her case remains unpunished (25 June 2014)

Chiapas: 17 years after the forced disappearance of Minerva Guadalupe Pérez Torres, her case is taken up at the IACHR (25 June 2013)

Chiapas: 16 years of impunity in the case of the forced disappearance of Minerva Guadalupe Pérez Torres (25 June 2012)

Chiapas: Masojá Shucjá, commemoration of the victims of the victims of the conflict of ’95 and ’96 (7 October 2011)


Guerrero: One year since the arrest of the CECOP leader, Marco Antonio Suastégui

June 29, 2015

Photo @Pueblo Guerrero

Members of the Council of Ejidos and Communities Opposed to the La Parota Dam (CECOP) protested on 17 June at the offices of the Judiciary in Acapulco, where they demanded that authorities from the three levels of government immediately release their leader Marco Antonio Suástegui, alleging his innocence, with this being the reason they will not rest until he is free. Marco Antonio Suástegui, who has been imprisoned for a year, founded the Communal Police in the Common Lands of Cacahuatepec, and for years he opposed the La Parota hydroelectric dam project. Upon the completion of a year since the arrest of the CECOP leader, the Tlachinollan Mountain Center for Human Rights urged the Superior Tribunal for State Justice, based in Acapulco, to resolve the three appeals that have been presented against the prison sentence. The organization denounced that the Tribunal “has delayed its decisions on the appeals for no reason, thus prolonging the process.” It also said that the motions against imprisonment demonstrated violations to due process, including the fact that, at the time that Suastégui declared himself, he was not allowed to have an attorney present.

For more information (in Spanish):

Protestan integrantes de la CECOP; piden la libertad de Marco Antonio Suástegui (Bajo Palabra, 17 de junio de 2015)

Ha dilatado las decisiones sobre los recursos de apelación en el caso de Marco Antonio Suástegui sin fundamento alguno, retrasando el proceso, acusó Tlachinollan (Pueblo Guerrero, 18 de junio de 2015)

CECOP protesta en el poder Judicial en Acapulco (Pueblo Guerrero, 17 de junio de 2015)

Video Libertad para Marco Antonio Suastégui (Tlachinollan)

Caso la Parota (Tlachinollan)

For more information from SIPAZ (in English):

Guerrero: return of CECOP spokesperson to Guerrero prison (23 April 2015)

Guerrero: The Navy has tried to arrest him, denounces brother of CECOP spokesperson (30 December 2014)

Guerrero: Attack on CECOP members leaves 5 dead (6 December 2014)


Chiapas: Polluted water given to prisoners at Prison No. 5 in San Cristóbal de Las Casas

June 29, 2015

Foto @ Chiapas Paralelo

Photo @ Chiapas Paralelo

Alejandro Díaz Santiz, currently held in Prison No. 5 of San Cristóbal de Las Casas, who is organized in solidarity with the Voz del Amate and adheres to the Sixth Declaration of the Lacandon Jungle, has called on the National Human Rights Commission (CNDH) and the State Commission on Human Rights (CEDH) to intervene within the prevailing situation of lack of potable water being consumed in the institution. He denounced that the water comes from a deteriorated cistern that contains fissures, such that sewage from the prison enter. He postulated this as being the reason for diarrheal and dermatological diseases.

The promise made by director Pascual Martínez Cervantes is that he will resolve this problem; however, this problem has existed for a long time, and we have seen an increasing trend of more ill prisoners,” he explained to Chiapas Paralelo. He added that within the prison purified water is sold, but the prisoners lack the means with which to buy it.

For more information (in Spanish):

Reos del penal de San Cristóbal consumen agua contaminada, piden intervención de CNDH (Chiapas Paralelo, 15 de junio de 2015)

For more information from SIPAZ (in English):

Chiapas: Alejandro Díaz expresses his solidarity with the disappeared students of Ayotzinapa and their families (30 December 2014)

Chiapas: new denunciation from prisoner Alejandro Díaz Santis upon concluding fast (26 October 2014)

Chiapas: Prisoner Alejandro Díaz Santis fasting to demand justice (11 October 2014)

Chiapas: 13 days of fasting and praying by Alejandro Díaz Santís to demand his release (14 July 2014)


Chiapas/Guerrero: Delegation of relatives and comrades of Ayotzinapa students tour communities of the National Indigenous Congress (CNI)

June 29, 2015

Delegación de Ayotzinapa en Palenque, Chiapas @OmarEl44

Ayotzinapa delegation in Palenque, Chiapas @OmarEl44

On June 16, a caravan of relatives and comrades of the disappeared and murdered students from Ayotzinapa arrived to Chiapas to meet with indigenous communities organized within the National Indigenous Congress (CNI) who adhere to the Sixth Declaration of the Lacandona Jungle. Doña Bertha Nava and Don Tomás Ramírez, the parents of Julio César Ramírez Nava, who was murdered on September 26, 2014 in Iguala, Guerrero, Doña Cristina Bautista Salvador, mother of Benjamín Ascencio Bautista (disappeared), and Omar García, a student from the Rural Normal School, comprised the caravan. The caravan began its first day in the community of San Francisco, municipality of Teopisca, with the participation of Semilla Digna, a collective from the Chiapas highlands, the Network in Defense of Indigenous Peoples of the Highlands of Chiapas, and the Las Abejas Civil Society. Omar García noted that “Ayotzinapa has united many of us, and if we are not all against the system, we still work together, because we do not count ourselves by number, but rather by strength of relationships that are weaved in this struggle.Regarding the pain of Acteal, he said, what you have suffered, we too have suffered. Now we must confront that pain, together, with you.”

On June 17, the caravan continued onto San Sebastián Bachajón, municipality of Chilón, with the presence and participation of members organized in the ejido of San Sebastián Bachajón, representatives of communities that make up the People United in Defense of Electrical Energy (PUDEE) and the ejido of Tila. In Cumbre Nachoj, the headquarters of the ejido where the meeting took place, Doña Berta expressed that “in Tixtla Guerrero, we thought it was just us, but all of us have been beaten down by the government in one way or another.” The conclusion of the caravan took place in Palenque with the organization XINICH that is comprised of indigenous communities of the northern Lacandon jungle, ejidatarios from San Sebastián Bachajón, the Autonomous Council of the Coastal Zone, human-rights defenders, and the civil society in solidarity, demanding justice for Ayotzinapa and also for the case of the massacre in the Viejo Velasco community in the Ocosingo municipality that continues in impunity and took place in 2006.

For more information (in Spanish):

Que no nos pisoteen, que no somos gusanos, somos seres humanos y estamos en pie de lucha”, madres de Ayotzinapa, en Palenque Chiapas.(Radio Pozol, 20 de junio de 2015)

#Ayotzinapa visita CNI Chiapas: San Francisco (Koman ilel, 19 de junio de 2015)

Encuentro entre familiares de los normalistas de Ayotzinapa y comunidades del CNI en Chiapas – San Sebastián Bachajón (Radio Zapatista, 17 de junio de 2015)

#Ayotzinapa visita a las comunidades del CNI en Chiapas: Día 1, San Francisco (Koman Ilel, 16 de junio de 2015)

For more information from SIPAZ (in English):

Guerrero/National: 8 months after the forcible disappearance of the 43 students from the Rural Normal School of Ayotzinapa, there is no progress (9 June 2015)


Lacking budget and political will, the Law on the Rights of Children and Adolescents in Chiapas could prove illusory

June 29, 2015

© SIPAZ  Protesta de las niñas y niños (septiembre 2014)

© SIPAZ Children’s protest (September 2014)

Civil-society organizations that comprise the National Front for the Rights of Childen and Adolescents expressed their concern regarding the implementation of the Law on the Rights of Children and Adolescents in Chiapas (LDNNACH), which was approved on June 2. These organizations write that “Though this Law may signify a great advance against backwardness, we believe it to be basic for it be supported with investment and the political support of the State Executive, the Congress, and the local municipalities, which must develop and construct a normative, institutional, and political state of law that is capable of guaranteeing the effective exercise of the rights of children and adolescents in Chiapas.”

These organizations expressed their worries regarding the limitations of the Law in terms of “inverting the grave situation of rights-violations of the nearly 2 million children and adolescents who live in the state, 84% of whom live in poverty, and 1 in three of whom speak some indigenous language. Chiapas is an entry point for hundreds of Central American children who are fleeing violence in their countries, such that we demand respect for the highest international human-rights standards to promote the active participation of civil society in the processes of legal and institutional regulation.”

The organizations insist on the importance of the point that the Prosecutorial Office for the Protection of the Rights of Children, Adolescents, and the Family be part of a higher institution, and not to lack the necessary elements for the special protection of children in the interests of social welfare.

The communique adds that, “With special concern we see that [the State] omitted to establish the responsibility and obligation of the State to assign resources to guarantee the right to food, housing, health,and education for children and adolescents who have been orphaned, or attended to by Centers for Social Assistance, thus placing the responsibilities for their caretaking on civil-society organizations.”

The organizations also warned that “migrant children and adolescents and refugee minors will continue to go without protection from arbitrary arrest and deportation.”

For these reasons, the organizations called on “the corresponding authorities to respond to their obligations to observe the rights set forth in the Convention on the Rights of the Child, and not to legislate under the mandate of the LGDNNA, but instead to guarantee the informed and effective participation of children and adolescents in the decision-making processes which affect their immediate and future surroundings, and to generate broad, transparent, and inclusive mechanisms.”

For more information (in Spanish):

Sin presupuesto ni voluntad política, Ley de Derechos de Niñas, Niños y Adolescentes en Chiapas podría quedar en letra muerta, chiapasparalelo, 11 de junio de 2015

En riesgo Ley de derechos de niñas, niños y adolescentes en Chiapas, Regeneracion, 20 de mayo de 2015

For more information from SIPAZ (in English):

Chiapas/National: Mobilization #x1heightlaw in favor of the human rights of children and adolescents (1 October 2014)

National/Chiapas: “little to celebrate” for Children’s Day (16 May 2014)

Chiapas: Forum on “The rights of childhood and adolescence in southeastern Mexico” (15 March 2014)


Mexico: Final results of the 2015 midterm elections

June 25, 2015

(@Portico online)

(@Portico online)

On Sunday, June 7, 2015, more than 83 million Mexicans voted for 1,996 public offices, including 9 governorships, 500 federal deputies, and hundreds of local offices in different states of the Republic.

A week after the elections, upon finalizing the calculation of votes, the National Electoral Institute (INE) reported that the deputies chosen by direct votes and proportional representation within the Chamber of Deputies would include 203 seats for the PRI (which will retain the majority vote), 108 for the PAN, 56 for PRD, 47 for the Green Ecologist Party (PVEM), 35 for MORENA, 26 for the Citizens’ Movement, 8 for Social Encounter, 10 for New Alliance (PANAL), and 6 for the Labor Party (PT). 41% of the offices will be held by women.

The election registered a participation of 47.72% of eligible voters, while the percentage of blank votes reached 4.76% of the total.

For more information (in Spanish):

¿Cuántos legisladores tendrá cada partido en la Cámara de Diputados? (Animal Político, 14 de junio de 2015)

INE confirma resultados para diputados federales; PRI obtuvo más de 11 milliones de votos (Sdp Noticias, 14 de junio de 2015)

PRI será mayoría en San Lazaro; finaliza el conteo (El Universal, 14 de junio de 2015)

Ganadores de las elecciones del 7 de junio del 2015 (El Economista, 15 de junio de 2015)

For more information from SIPAZ (in English):

Guerrero: PRI wins elections within violent context (25 June 2015)

Chiapas: abstentionism and blank votes “win” in midterm elections (25 June 2015)

Oaxaca: Violent election day: 440 incidents, 92 arrests, injured, disappeared, and one killed (25 June 2015)


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