Chiapas: Believing People Pilgrimage

February 5, 2017

Believing Pople .pngBelieving People Pilgrimage in San Cristóbal, 2016 Photo: El Heraldo de Chiapas

On January 25, members of Believing Peoples of the Diocese of San Cristóbal de Las Casas held a pilgrimage on the fifth anniversary of the death of Jtatik Samuel Ruíz and also for the commemoration of the 25th anniversary of the Diocesan Coordination of Women (CODIMUJ).

About 4,000 people came from the municipalities of Comitan, Frontera Comalapa, Chicomuselo, Altamirano, Tila, Las Margaritas, Ocosingo, Chilon, La Trinitaria, La Independencia, San Cristóbal, Chenalho, San Juan Chamula, Larrainzar, Oxchuc, among others. They met in the Cathedral Square of San Cristobal de las Casas to remember Jtatik Samuel in prayer.

As Believing Peoples, they proposed building autonomy in the communities, recovering the structure of government, resisting the projects and recovering the autonomous and community governments, facing the 2018 elections, as the political parties are already controlling and organizing their people In communities.

Believing Peoples denounce “the poverty that is increasing by the rise of [the price of] gasoline, gas, electricity, tortilla, transportation and everything. We denounce the nationalist egotism of the new government in the United States, which excludes emigrants and who only looks out for their economic interests, without solidarity with less developed countries. “

For more information in Spanish:

http://www.prensalibrechiapas.com/2014/index.php/secciones/portada/item/4226-realizan-peregrinacion-por-el-sexto-aniversario-luctuoso-de-jtatik-samuel (Prensa Libre Chiapas, a 25 de enero de 2017)

Pueblo Creyente: “Denunciamos los proyectos de muerte” (Chiapas Denuncia, a 25 de enero de 2017)

For more information from SIPAZ:

Entrega del 5to reconocimiento jTatik Samuel Jcanan Lum

Chiapas: Pueblo Creyente de Simojovel rechaza diálogo con los hermanos Gómez

Chiapas: El Pueblo Creyente peregrinó en Tuxtla en apoyo a las y los maestros

 


Mexico/Guatemala: International Human Rights Observation Mission on Guatemala-Mexico Border

December 1, 2016

gm1“72” Refuge for Migrant Persons, Tenosique, Mexico. Photo@SIPAZ

An International Human Rights Observation Mission on the Guatemala-Mexico Border (MODH in its Spanish acronym) was held from November 10 to 16 to document and highlight the situation of systematic violations of human rights in the border region between Guatemala and Mexico.

The MODH was made up of 24 human rights defenders from countries such as Colombia, El Salvador, Ecuador, Spain, Mexico, the United States and Canada, and more than 30 who accompanied them belonging to the member organizations of the Cross-border Migration and Gender Coordination Committee (MTMG in its Spanish acronym) on both the Mexican and Guatemalan sides [of the border].

The MODH divided along two routes, both beginning their journey in the City of Guatemala.

– Route one passed through: Quetzaltenango, Huehuetenango, La Mesilla and on the Mexican side to Comalapa Border, Tapachula, Suchiate, Acacoyagua, Mapastepec, Tonala and Arriaga.

– Route two passed through: Coban, Sayaxche, Santa Elena and on the Mexican side, Tenosique, Palenque, Salto de Agua and Ocosingo.

They travelled in vehicles to a total of 30 locations and 2,211 kilometers of the cross-border region. Both routes met on November 15 in San Cristobal de Las Casas where they shared their experiences and observations.

GM2.jpgPhoto@SIPAZ

The observers had the opportunity to listen to problems of more than 70 organizations and collectives as well as different ways of combating them. They interviewed approximately 1,600 people affected by dispossession, violence against migrants and refugees, and gender-based violence, including members of the Mam, Quiche, Q’anjobal, Kakchiquel, Tseltal, Tsotsil, Tojolabal, Zoque, Chol and mestizos. The MODH visited places that are directly affected by this violence, and were able to verify and document not only constant situations of injustice but also that, in spite of this, people are still fighting for life and dignity.

Among the observations of the MODH, are:

– Since 2012, the number of Central American people who are arriving at the Guatemala/Mexico border has seen a steady increase.

– The number of women migrants has risen, accounting for almost 20% of the migration phenomenon.

– Although migrants from Guatemala, Honduras and El Salvador are the majority, people from other countries, such as the Congo, are now being registered.

– As a consequence of the implementation of energy, mining, agro-industrial, tourism and infrastructure projects, an accelerated dispossession of territory is happening, due to forced displacement, alteration of ecosystems, pollution of agricultural soils and water sources, as well as damage to health, divisions and impacts on the livelihoods of campesino and indigenous communities.

– There is “a common pattern of criminalization, persecution and repression of migrant women and human rights and territory defenders that can lead to loss of liberty and even murder.”

– Even the MODH was watched and harassed in some places by security and intelligence agents in both countries.

– In general, a lack of access to justice for those affected and the prevalence of impunity in the case of those who dare to report can be seen.

– The testimonies revealed a deep crisis of human rights violations with multiple cases of threats, criminality, trafficking, disappearance, kidnapping, robbery, assault, torture, mass murder, rape and sexual abuse, femicide, and corruption, among others.

GM3.jpgNovember 16: The MODH presents its findings in San Cristobal de Las Casas, Chiapas, where it also met with the “Caravan of Mothers of Disappeared Migrants.”

The MODH warned: “In most cases of human rights violations heard by the Mission, a direct responsibility of public authorities is identified, in collusion with organized crime and national and transnational corporations, which act through co-optation and corruption of the justice system, supported by the presence of private security companies and groups of armed civilians.”

For more information in Spanish:

Denuncian persecución a migrantes, mujeres y defensores en frontera sur (Desinformémonos, 21 de noviembre de 2016)

Patrón en la frontera sur, criminalización y persecución a mujeres, migrantes y defensores (Proceso, 17 de noviembre de 2016)

Comunicado final de la MODH (Voces mesoamericanas, a 16 de noviembre de 2016)

Plan Frontera Sur potencia deportaciones, acusan ONG (La Jornada, 13 de noviembre de 2016)

Inicia Misión Internacional de Observación de Derechos Humanos en la Frontera Guatemala-México (MODH) (Red Nacional de Organismos Civiles de derechos Humanos, Todos los Derechos para Todos y Todas, a 10 de noviembre de 2016)

For more information from SIPAZ:

Nacional/Internacional: anuncian Misión Internacional de Observación de Derechos Humanos en la frontera Guatemala-México (4 de noviembre de 2016)

 

 


Mexico: Mothers of Disappeared Migrants “Looking for Life on Roads of Death”

November 28, 2016

Mothers.jpgXII Mothers of Disappeared Migrants Caravan, Comitan de Dominguez, Chiapas, November, 2016. Photo@SIPAZ

On November 15, the XII Caravan of Central American Mothers entered Mexico to search for their missing children. The Caravan will pass through 11 states and 30 localities that the mothers who make up the twelfth caravan will tour from November 15 to December 3, 2016, called “We Look for Life on the Roads of Death” in memory of comrade Berta Caceres.

On November 15, delegations from Nicaragua, Guatemala, Honduras, and El Salvador met at La Mesilla border in the Guatemalan department of Huehuetenango to enter Mexican territory and cover part of the migratory route in search of traces of their children. The press release explains: “This year we have decided to move along new routes. The point of entry marks the beginning of a route that, although not new, has been growing since the plans for containment and detention of the Southern Border Plan, which has forced transit through the territory to blur increasing the risks and threats during the trip”.

Under the auspices of the Mesoamerican Migrant Movement and supported by a large network of Mexican and international humanitarian organizations, the caravan seeks to make the absence of thousands of Central Americans who have been disappearing in Mexico for decades visible.

For more information in Spanish:

COMUNICADO: Caravana de Madres de Migrantes Desaparecidos 2016, Movimiento Migrante Mesoamericano, 8 de noviembre de 2016

Ingresa a México caravana de madres migrantes, El Universal, 15 de noviembre de 2016

11 estados en 19 días: Así será el viaje de madres de migrantes desaparecidos por México, Animal Político, 12 de noviembre de 2016

Ingresa a México la Caravana de Madres de migrantes desaparecidos (Proceso, 15 de noviembre de 2016)

Ingresa a México la doceava Caravana de Madres Centroamericanas (La Jornada, 15 de noviembre de 2016)

Madres de desaparecidos en México y Centroamérica “hermanan” su dolor en Hemiciclo a Juárez (Proceso, 24 de noviembre de 2016)

For more information from SIPAZ:

Oaxaca/Nacional: Viacrucis del Migrante exige derecho de refugio para migrantes (31/03/2016)

Nacional/Internacional: WOLA presentó nuevo informe: “Siguen violaciones a Derechos Humanos de migrantes” (19 de noviembre de 2015)

México: 5 años de la masacre de 72 migrantes en San Fernando, Tamaulipas (26 de agosto de 2015)

Nacional/internacional: La CIDH expresa su preocupación ante el endurecimiento de las autoridades mexicanas hacia los migrantes y sus defensores en la frontera Sur (17 de junio de 2015)

Nacional: XI Caravana de Madres Migrantes Centroamericanas en busca de sus hijos está en camino por México (14/12/2015)


National/International: International Observation Mission on Human Rights on Guatemala – Mexico Border Announced

November 6, 2016

guatemala.pngFacebook page for the International Observation Mission on Human Rights on the Guatemala – Mexico Border. Photo@MODH

On October 26, the start of an International Observation Mission on Human Rights on the Guatemala-Mexico Border (MODH in its Spanish acronym), to be held from November 10 to 16, was announced.

This initiative arose from multiple meetings between organizations on both sides of the border, which have been in dialogue and gradually weaving a “social and civic alliance between peoples of Guatemala and southern Mexico to visualize our path, the causes that unite us in the defense of human rights, and the struggles that we share in defense of territories, gender and migration.”

 The MODH will begin on November 10 in Guatemala City and from there two observation paths of about a thousand kilometers will be opened. Both arrive in San Cristobal de Las Casas on November 16, performing several public actions there.

Observers from countries like Brazil, Canada, Colombia, Ecuador, El Salvador, Spain, the United States, Guatemala, Honduras and Mexico have been confirmed, all of them being people with extensive experience in migration and human rights.

The MODH invited “all individuals, communities and organizations in Guatemala and Mexico to be encouraged to join this direct action, to follow up and disseminate their contents and results, as a form of defense of human rights and a call for a paradigm change for this region of Latin America.”

For more information in Spanish:

COMUNICADO, Mesa Transfronteriza Migraciones y Género, Misión Internacional de Observación de Derechos Humanos en la Frontera Guatemala – México (Misión Internacional de Observación de Derechos Humanos en la Frontera Guatemala – México, a 26 de octubre de 2016)

Integrarán Misión Internacional de Observación de Derechos Humanos en la Frontera GUatemala-México (Diario de Chiapas, 27 de octubre de 2016)

For more information from SIPAZ:

Nacional/internacional: La CIDH expresa su preocupación ante el endurecimiento de las autoridades mexicanas hacia los migrantes y sus defensores en la frontera Sur (17 de junio de 2016)

Nacional/Internacional: WOLA presentó nuevo informe: “Siguen violaciones a Derechos Humanos de migrantes” (19 de noviembre de 2015)

 


Chiapas: Maximiliano Gordillo Martinez Reappears after 52 Days Missing

September 8, 2016

max

In a joint statement published on September 2, the Fray Bartolome de Las Casas Center for Human Rights (CDHFBC), Meso-American Voices and La 72 Shelter for Migrants, reported that the youth Maximiliano Gordillo Martinez, who was missing since May 7 when he was stopped at a checkpoint of the National Migration Institute (INM) in Tabasco, reappeared alive.

Located on August 29, Maximilian is now with his family. They denounced that “since his arrest by INM federal agents on May 7 last at the immigration checkpoint at Chablé, Tabasco, until the day of his location on August 29, Maximiliano -a youth of 18 from the municipality of Socoltenango- was the victim of crimes and serious violations of his human rights, through the blame of the Mexican state. “

They claimed that “the documenting and analysis of the case continues in order to define the terms of the follow-up”, while asking for “sensitivity and respect to the processes of healing and strengthening as concrete ways of expressing solidarity”.

They stated that “what Maximiliano lived through reveals the magnitude of the structural, institutional and social violence suffered by Mexicans and people from other countries during their movements to migratory destinations within our country. But it also reminds us that the demand for and realization of truth, justice and full reparation imply a conscious and mobilized civil society.”

For more information in Spanish:

Tras 52 días de desaparecido, joven indígena aparece con vida en Chiapas (Revista Proceso, 3 de septiembre de 2016)

Reaparece joven mexicano detenido por el INM desde mayo (La Jornada, 3 de septiembre de 2016)

A casi cuatro meses de que el INM lo desapareciera, indígena chiapaneco es hallado con vida (Sin Embargo, 3 de septiembre de 2016)

Boletín “Maximiliano ya está con nosotros, con nosotras” (CDHFBC, Voces Mesoamericanas, La 72, 3 de septiembre de 2016)

For more information from SIPAZ:

Chiapas/Nacional: Siguen las exigencias de la presentación con vida de Maximiliano Gordillo Martinez, desaparecido forzadamente en mayo (24 de agosto de 2016)

Chiapas/Nacional: Conferencia de prensa sobre la desaparición Forzada de Maximiliano Gordillo Martínez (16 de junio de 2016)

Chiapas/Nacional : Denuncian desaparición forzada de Maximiliano Gordillo Martínez por agentes del INM (24 de mayo de 2016)

 


Chiapas/National: Demands That Maximiliano Gordillo Martinez, Forcibly Disappeared in May, Be Presented Alive Continue

August 28, 2016

Max.pngPress conference to demand that Maximiliano Gordillo Martínez be presented alive (Photo @AFPTV)

Maximiliano Martinez Gordillo, 18, who left his home in the municipality of Socoltenango for Playa del Carmen, Quintana Roo in search of work, was forcibly disappeared “at the hands of immigration agents” last May. Since then, the Fray Bartolome de Las Casas Centre for Human Rights (CDHFBC), along with Mesoamerican Voices (Voices), Home 72 – Refuge for Migrants (La 72), and the disappeared boy’s parents have been seeking his whereabouts. On August 21, Maximilian turned 19 and is still missing. As part of the efforts being made to demand Maximilian be presented alive, parents, CDHFBC, Voices and the 72 have joined forces to hold several press conferences in Chiapas, Tabasco and recently in Mexico City, where they claimed that on May 7 last, the National Migration Institute (INM) “in conjunction with Tabasco State Police took Maximilian from the bus he was migrating on to another state of the republic in search of work, he was arrested, intimidated and disappeared.”

The arrests of migrants from Central America, Mexico and people on their way to the United States of America, is nothing new. The CDHFBC, Voices and 72 reported in a press conference in Mexico City that, “according to official figures, from October 2014 to April 2015, the US stopped 70,440 people, while 92,889 migrants were deported in the same period by the Mexican State. Meanwhile, in 2015, Mexico deported approximately 150,000 migrants from El Salvador, Guatemala and Honduras primarily, representing an increase of 44% over the previous year, making it the biggest “deporter” of people at global level.” They also say that this hardening “is added to the crime of organized groups that steal from, extort, commit sexual crimes against and kidnap migrants. There have also been documented cases of trafficking for sex work and cases of young people who are forced to work for organized crime itself. These criminal groups operate in the territories under constant and staunch presence of the immigration authorities and public security bodies; from this the participation and responsibility of the authorities of the Mexican state is inferred, although they deny it, there is an abundance of testimonies from residents and victims, who constantly point out both direct participation of public officials across all hierarchical levels in these crimes, as well as complicity, tolerance and ineffectiveness in prosecuting those responsible.”

Given this panorama, human rights organizations, together with the family, made an urgent call for national and international solidarity to demand the immediate presentation with life of Maximilian, and “a comprehensive investigation into those responsible.” Among other actions, they invited people to sign and share the urgent action on the Avaaz website, and to widely share the story of Maximilian. Both links can be found below.

For more information in Spanish:

Firma la petición en Avaaz

La desaparición forzada práctica cotidiana en México Violaciones a derechos humanos cometidas por agentes de Migración (CDHFBC, Voces Mesoamericanas, La 72 Hogar y Refugio para personas migrantes, 22 de agosto de 2016)

Desaparición Forzada por agentes migratorios. Historia de Maximiliano Gordillo Martínez (Centro de Derechos Humanos Miguel Agustín Pro Juárez, 22 de agosto de 2016)

México: Agentes de Migración participan en desapariciones (ONG) (22 de agosto de 2016)

Le diría a Peña Nieto que me devuelva mi hijo, porque su gente lo detuvo: padre de migrante desaparecido (Revolución res punto cero, 23 de agosto de 2016)

Perspectivas – La desaparición forzada del joven Maximiliano Gordillo (RompeViento TV, 23 agosto 2016)

A tres meses de la desaparición forzada de Maximiliano Gordillo Martínez, entre la impunidad y corrupción (Voces Mesoamericanas, 8 de agosto de 2016)

Instituto Nacional de Migración desaparece a Joven Migrante Chiapaneco (Radio Zapote, 18 de agosto de 2016)

For more information from SIPAZ:

Chiapas/Nacional: Conferencia de prensa sobre la desaparición Forzada de Maximiliano Gordillo Martínez (16 de junio de 2016)

Chiapas/Nacional : Denuncian desaparición forzada de Maximiliano Gordillo Martínez por agentes del INM (24 de mayo de 2016)


National: “Narco Violence” Has Displaced 281,000 People

July 25, 2016

Narco.pngViolence in the country has increased due to the presence of “narcos” (Photo:@Economia hoy)

According to research from the Center of Social Studies and Public Opinion (CESOP) of the Chamber of Deputies, the situation of generalized violence in which various zones of the country find themselves, has led to an increased number of people who have been forced to displace in the country. According to CESOP “the violence generated by drug cartels throughout the country” is one of the most recognized reasons people are forced to flee their lands. Despite discrepancies in the figures and not counting with official statistics, it is estimated that between 2011 and 2015 “281,418 people were forced to escape” from their homes. According to the results of the research, the states of Guerrero, Oaxaca and Chiapas, among others, are the states with the highest number of displaced.

The “criminal organizations not only fight over drug trafficking routes now, but also aspire to control more and more territory in general.” According to the Guiding Principles on Internal Displacement of the UNO, forced displacement happens when “persons or groups of persons have been forced or obliged to flee or to leave their homes or places of habitual residence, in particular as result of or to avoid the effects of armed conflict, situations of generalized violence, violations of human rights or natural disasters or [those] caused by humans, and who have not crossed an internationally recognized state border.” In most cases, the families have been displaced within Mexico. While internationally there are extensive regulations and a legal basis for the protection of displaced persons in the area of forced internal displacement, there are no equivalent legal instruments.

For this reason, and in order to continue adding to the analysis of this problem, the National Human Rights Commission (CNDH) published the “Special Report on Forced Internal Displacement (FID) in Mexico” in May of this year. It says that, “the Federal Government recognized that among the factors that most influenced the increase in violence, disputes in and between criminal organizations involved in drug trafficking stand out.” “However the importance of the protection of human rights and displaced persons stands out,” the research concludes. Having recognized that there is no global figure for internal displacement generated by the violence of the drug cartels, it warns that “the Mexican authorities have downplayed or ignored the problem” to date. The CESOP document stresses that as happens with the information included in reports of kidnapping of migrants, the Mexican State has discredited figures on internal displacement.

For more information in Spanish

Violencia del narco ha desplazado a 281 mil (Milenio, 18 de julio de 2016)

El gobierno minimiza el creciente problema de las personas desplazadas, afirma el Legislativo (La Jornada, 18 de julio de 2016)

Los desplazados del narco (Vanguardia, 15 de julio de 2016)

El Estado mexicano se contradice ante el desplazamiento interno forzado (Animal Político, 4 de julio de 2016)

Informe Especial sobre Desplazamiento Forzado Interno (DFI) en México (CNDH, 1 de mayo de 2016)

For more information from SIPAZ

Nacional: CNDH lamenta más de 35 mil víctimas de desplazamiento forzado interno en el país (16 de mayo de 2016)